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  1. You should consider your post-secondary paths and how admissions considers IB. Basically if you can average at least a 5 in every course, that essentially guarantees that you can get admitted to universities. Averaging 6 or above can ensure you will be quite successful in uni. You should continue in the program if you want to reap such rewards. Admission-wise, some very competitive or specialized schools (eg art schools, advanced science/math/engineering programs) may not need a diverse curriculum such as IB but IB can still be rewarding for such students. You should consider leaving IB if there is too much stress or damage to your health, or if the program is too expensive. Otherwise what you have I think are typical grades and have lots of potential for growth and improvement if you work hard and effectively.
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  2. @IB`ez almost had it. Usually, registration is when any candidate must finalize the diploma subjects and certificate subject. If the school wants to avoid any late fees, this happens at the latest at 6 months before exams. However because you need 3 HLs, as of right now all your HLs must be diploma subjects. Math and history must also be taken since those are the only group 4 and 5 subjects you take. Therefore there is the choice of French B or Arabic Lit (ie opting for a bilingual diploma) for the remaining diploma subject; the other one then becomes the certificate subject. You can have greater flexibility if you have 4 HLs. Late registration is also possible, at 25-100 euros extra per subject change depending on when you make up your mind. EDIT: I forgot that you can elect to take two group 1s instead of a group 1 and a group 2.
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  4. I don't think you have to worry about your IB scores staying valid long enough – I don't have exact numbers, but I'm willing to bet they''d last more than 3 years. There ARE disadvantages with taking gap years as even with higher overall marks, you'll have universities wondering if you're taking a gap year solely in order to get into better schools, which isn't that valid a reason (at least to them). To avoid this, you'll need to be very productive even whilst your taking a gap year e.g. doing volunteer work abroad, employment at a company, pursuing a primary passion such as writing/art etc. Without doing these or similar things, your chances at getting into those schools are slimmer than even if you applied to Yale with a predicted 38 whilst you're still at senior year. Also such scores aren't the deciding factors in applying for admissions to such schools. Top American schools require extremely high scores in the SATs, usually above 1450/1600 to stand a chance. Oxford on the other hand, although without SAT requirements and are relatively less "holistic" compared to US schools, will still demand interview processes that really looks at what kind of individual you are, also looking at how many related activities you've done e.g. hospital interns or volunteering at medical camps for medicine. All these factors combined make it rather unfavourable for people to take gap years, unless they have genuine reasons to do so. Although getting 43 points in the IB is an extremely respectable feat and something you should be very proud of, unfortunately the very best schools in the world won't really consider it the same way. Also, the UCAS application deadline isn't until January 15. You do have some time to prepare a solid application into prestigious UK schools such as Warwick, UCL, ICL, LSE – all considered near or on par with Oxbridge.
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  5. I loves those two subjects too! But my school only offers none of the subjects... and I'm learning online... Back to the question, in my opinion, you can try doing four HLs first and see if you endure that workload. Because sometimes you would find out that you wanna switch one subject to SL. After you had done one or two months of HL math and physics, then you can decide which one to switch to SL. There's one thing it is supper important, maybe more important than which subject you like better, is that your teacher! What I found is, a better teacher would help you learn better. When I say a better teacher is doesn't mean a teacher who is just nice, but also has good teaching techniques and always be encouraging. So you can have a look of who is likely to teach you math and physics next year and then decide which subject to choose. Last, my suggestion is to choose physics HL, because it's solving problems involves mathematical calculations, not only math.
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  6. 1. Is choosing relevant IB subjects important towards what I would like to study at university? Or is IB scores more important? This depends on two factors: what and where you want to study. For example, I know that the U.K. definitely cares a lot about which subjects you choose. It is highly likely that you will not get into a Engineering course without HL Maths and Physics, and it is also highly likely that you will not get into a Economics course without HL Economics etc. etc. On the other hand, and please do keep in mind that I am no expert, I believe that they are quite a bit more lenient in the U.S. My absolute nr.1 advice for anyone choosing their IB courses is to TAKE 4 HLs!! No but seriously, take 4 HLs (if your school allows you that is). Then, if you find out that you dislike one of your HLs you can always switch it down to SL. I, for example, started off with: HL Physics, Maths, Chemistry and Geography. Now I've found out that I absolutely DESPISE geography (btw, I see that you're interested in taking Geo. Don't get discouraged by me, most people in my class like it/find it fairly easy so don't worry) and that I LOVE english (which is a subject I hated last year). So I switched down Geo to SL and English up to HL. I am still keeping 4 HLs throughout this entire school year as I am yet unsure of which one to drop. 2. Do you think it's reasonable for a student to choose a subject that they have never studied before for IB? For example, do you think choosing Geography HL for IB is wise when the student have never studied Geography during IGCSE I don't quite know what you mean by "no exposure". For example, at my school, we didn't do any IGCSEs in any of the social studies. We did one trimester Econ, one trimester History and one trimester Geo throughout 9th and 10th grade. If you mean no exposure as to this level I think you should go for it but I do not think that you should take a subject you have absolutely no idea what it is about. 3. What subjects for IB should I choose in order to increase my chances of studying business/finance in University? I'm still unsure about my abilities currently as I have increased my effort levels for this year substantially, as a result, I am getting score 2 grade boundaries than last year in most subjects. I'm not too well-informed regarding the humanities and their undergraduate courses but looking at the subjects you already have, I'd recommend choosing another humanities subject. Hope this all helped!! Good luck in the IB!
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  7. B.A Chemistry + B.F.A Graphic Design dual degree M.F.A Design+Media Ph.D Art History, perhaps? I love chemistry very much and I want to become an multidisciplinary artist. I think both science and humanities knowledge are important for an artist to enrich himself/herself and create meaningful artworks. Artists do not only draw; artists can make ideas come to life and shape the future. P.S. Recently I am designing the 4 new elements proposed by the IUPAC This one's nihonium.
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  8. Physics! Physics! Definitely Physics!
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  9. TL;DR: Analysis is actually easy. Just follow my five-step formula: 1) language choice, 2) meaning 3) effect, 4) meaning and purpose, 5) effect and purpose. The Problem One crucial skill that IB teachers do not teach to a sufficient depth is how to actually analyse a quote. In this guide, I will explain the intuitions and assumptions behind analysis. I will also outline the exact steps you can take to write a strong, complete piece of analysis for any IB assessment task, whether it be IOC, IOP, Paper 1, Paper 2 or Works in Translation. What we will cover What exactly is analysis? What are the five steps of analysis? What exactly is analysis? Analysis is the act of explaining how and why a writer uses specific language choices. If you understand this statement, then you will understand IB English as a whole. This is the key to the fortress, so let's make sure you understand it inside out. We are intensely interested in the specific wording, literary techniques, punctuation, and grammar used by the writer of a given text. All of these aspects fall under language, so we must analyse all of them. Always seek to explain these language choices rather than just stating the fact. Always go deeper. For example, don't just say that "The writer uses technique X" and move on. You must go further in analysis, by addressing the two key questions: How / in what way is technique X being used? Why is technique X being used in this way? Is it being used to construct an idea or create an emotional effect, or both at the same time? Is the technique being contrasted or combined with another technique to enhance its effectiveness? How a writer chooses to manipulate and utilise a technique is a unique to every text. There are infinite ways in which a technique can be used, but your job is to just consider and explain a particular usage by a particular writer of a particular text. Why did the writer choose to use this specific word (or technique) instead of all the thousands of other capable options in the English language? Why this particular word? What makes this technique so special and important that the writer couldn't help but use it? What I just described is the high-level intuition of literary analysis. Here is a diagram to summarise what your understanding of analysis should look like at the moment. Forget what you've learned previously. This is your new blueprint. The next step in the guide is to show you how to actually address the key questions concerning the "how" and the "why" in your analytical writing. This blueprint of analysis applies to all areas of IB English, so it doesn't matter if it's IOC, IOP, Paper 1 or Paper 2. The same five-step formula applies in the exact same way, whether you live on Mercury or Jupiter or Atlantis. The following five-step formula is obeyed everywhere in this universe and beyond. Step 1. Identify specific language choices But before we get into the how and the why, let's look at the first step. It's simple. Say you've got a quote. Step 1 is just to annotate the quote, find interesting language choices (aka literary techniques), and decide on one (or more) to analyse. Steps 2 & 3. How to address "how" specific language is used You've picked a specific technique from an imaginary quote. To address the "how" to a satisfactory standard, there are two tasks that you need to do: Step 2. Explain how that specific technique creates a meaning (aka: idea, theme, notion). As an example, the metaphor "the man was a mountain" constructs the notion of the man's strength. Step 3. Explain how that specific technique creates an effect on the reader. This is the component that probably 80% (?) of IB English students fail to include, and yes, it's also the thing that drags down their mark. As an example, the language choice of "the man was a mountain" creates a feeling of fear in the reader, but that effect of fear only occurs if "the man" refers to an evil character. If "the man" refers instead to a heroic figure, then the reader would feel an entirely different emotion, namely admiration or a plethora of other positive emotions. What you just learned is that the "how" aspect actually consists of two tasks. Let's reflect that development in a newer, better diagram. Notice how the "why" has been left out. Well, we also have to look into the "why" more deeply before we add it back in. Steps 4 & 5. How to address "why" specific language is used First, you must understand that all writer's have a purpose. In other words, a writer always writes for a reason. Perhaps there is a profound insight that they want to share with the world, or a interesting story that they want others to be entertained by. Writers always have some sort of message, idea or story that they want to convey through their words. This assumption makes a lot of sense. Just sit down in front of an A4 piece of paper and tell yourself to "Write". Without motivation or an end goal, you can't write half a page, let alone a poem or a short story and certainly not a full-blown novel. Now, since a writer is motivated by a purpose that they desperately want to see happen, the writer's writing process is obviously influenced by this intention. In fact, every part of the writing process is influenced by this purpose; every word, every technique, every punctuation that a writer chooses must pass the one, ultimate test is applied inevitably, again and again, by the writer himself/herself: "Is this the best word or technique that I can use to get me closer to reaching my purpose?" For example, a certain JK Rowling is tossing up between using "horrendous" and "disturbing" to describe a Dementor in her upcoming Harry Potter book. Which word would she choose? Let's think it through in a logical way. Her purpose here would be to make the Dementor seem as horrifying as possible and to inspire as much fear from the reader as it is physically possible to do so with a couple letters printed on a piece of dead tree. The word choice of "horrendous" holds much graver, darker, and ominous connotations than the word "disturbing". A dead rat is disturbing; wearing socks with sandals is disturbing; but a Dementor is not disturbing, despite the irresistible alliteration that just rolls of the tongue: "disturbing Dementor". No, a Dementor is decidedly "horrendous", and that is why JK Rowling would have chosen "horrendous" over "disturbing" to describe her beloved Dementor. This specific language choice aligns with her purpose more so than the other potential language choice(s). Hence, the job of the IB English student, or the AP English student, or any student of literature for that matter, is to probe into the mind of the writer and justify why this specific word or that specific technique helps to achieve the writer's own purpose / message. Usually, a specific word is chosen to create a meaning and an effect that in turn achieve the writer's purpose. Concretely, steps 4 and 5 of the five-step formula are these: Step 4. Explain how the meaning from Step 2 helps to achieve the writer's purpose. Step 5. Explain how the effect from Step 3 helps to achieve the writer's purpose. Here is the final diagram that summarises the five-step formula of literary analysis for IB English, AP English, A-level English, any English. It's all the same. Here's a final tip. Often, Steps 4 and 5 are very similar. To avoid repeating yourself, just combine them in a sentence. For example, here's some smooth analysis that touches on all 5 steps a little bit, without it sounding mechanical and dumb: Hope this helps! IB English was such a pain in the butt when I did it, and I'm sure it still is for everyone else. Now I'm tutoring IB English and teaching it. The irony. Nah just kidding, English is great! (Once you understand it.) I hope this in-depth guide will aid you in your darkest moments, when you are tasked with analysing texts big and small, poetic and prose. If you want to get a complete guide to IB English analysis, including techniques, how to structure essays, how to write commentaries, etc., I offer a comprehensive online course called the Analysis Bootcamp for IB English. Check it out, it's pretty amazing! (I spent a lot of time on it.)
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  11. What is your 7th subject?? Your signature lists only 6. Usually that would be the one which does not fit into the regular IB diploma. For example, it could be a 3rd science or a 4th language. In the regular diploma you have to take one of each group (except for 6, which can be replaced with any other group). Your signature seems to me like a regular diploma. The 7th subject (the certificate one) could possibly therefore be the one not listed in there. If it's a 3rd science, like physics for example, you can choose which one you want to have as your diploma subject (for example you'd choose physics instead of biology as your diploma science). I am not sure how it would work with an irregular diploma, since no-one at my school takes it (or a 7th subject, for that matter).
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  12. Okay, so the "moral argument" is that God provides objective morals everyone can follow, because he is good. And then it moves on to say that if there is no God, then there are no morals in our society because nobody will lay obligations upon us and we shouldn't care if everyone just goes around killing everyone else. There's so much to be said here... - Moral values are not objective whatsoever. Which religion's values would you like to choose, and at which point in time? They're not all the same. Or is the only religion we should entertain modern-day Christianity, and their values? If I decide that I'd like to follow the Aztec religion, I can start executing people to sacrifice their hearts to the sun-god. Or, if I decide to be basically any other religion, they'll disagree and say this is a terrible idea. Religion is no more objectively moral than non-religion, unless you want to pick one specific one and ignore the existence of all the others. - The presenter seems to think that us humans are incapable of doing anything good without somebody telling them to. What stops me from murdering the people who annoy me, or from taking somebody's money when they're not looking? Firstly, it's the voice inside my head which says "this is not a morally good idea". It's also human society - we learn from a young age what our particular society sees as right and wrong, and that there are punishments for doing the wrong thing. Moral codes are similar, but not exactly the same, around the world. If I go to a Muslim country then I must dress more modestly than I would on the beach here in Australia (oh wow, there's a difference in religious morals again; not looking very subjective?) The things that are morally wrong are the best for survival; so we don't kill each other, we don't have intercourse with relatives, we don't steal, and we should share and help one another. Many of these behaviours can be seen in other highly developed species, such as dolphins and whales. The other origin of morality are those which develop from living in human society, such as the concept of justice for wrongdoing and giving away excess to charity. - I don't think the Christian God is good at all. This is the being who, annoyed that his minions weren't worshipping him enough, decided to send a massive flood to kill them all. He also manipulated a father to slaughter his child, had his son hideously tortured to death, and destroyed two cities because, well, they also weren't worshipping him enough. Are these good and morally correct actions to you?
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  14. You could link chaos theory as a whole to TOK, which could help with personal engagement and reflection. From what little I do know about chaos theory, I would say that the double-pendulum system on wikipedia would be a good place to start (it's calculus-related). Weather systems and fluid dynamics may also be related to chaos theory. However, you'd probably need a decent grasp of physics for these subjects. It's a big field, so I would like to emphasize kw0573's advice on choosing a narrower, more specific topic.
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  15. For the last few months I’ve been volunteering at my daughter’s high school to help the 12th graders review for the International Baccalaureate (IB) Maths Standard Level Exam in May 2015. In the process I produced these review notes that I thought could be useful to other students preparing for the exam as well. Review Notes for IB Maths Standard Level I’d be grateful if you email me with any mistakes you find so I can correct them. Best of luck on the upcoming exams.
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  16. Depends on your school for pre-IB. At my school they probably wouldn't let you take IB French just because it's harder than Grade 10 french. If it's a non-academic issue that's causing that mark, then maybe talk to the IB coordinator about your specific situation
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  17. Hi everyone, so terribly sorry for the late reply. I took everyone's advice and just received my ib results about 2 days ago and i received a total of 36 points far from what I expected . Thank you guys so much for your help, it really helped!
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  18. I like your idea, but there's a few parts of your question that you might want to change to enhance its clarity: 1. "How": this suggests that you are going to look at systematic ways that the French people used the ideology to end up with bloodthirsty results. I like to stick to "to what extent did x cause x in the period of x" as a staple 2. "bloodthirsty": really don't recommend saying this, maybe allude directly to the Reign of Terror or other violent aspects like the September Massacres, etc. 3. I really recommend you to have a time period, my adviser told me that it helps to narrow down your question which might help structure the extended essay more Good luck!
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  19. That's a really good point. There are no rules that I can find (I spent a couple of hours looking around) and have never heard of any. I'm pretty sure this is just your school's choice. This is a bit of an odd decision (your school's, I mean) because this is, after all, the arts and nude models are nothing new. If anything, for such a "sensitive" audience (or just school), you could simply do what we is done everywhere now --: warn viewers that they may be "disturbed" from their usual slumbering, monotonous, overly-safe and pampered lives -- in this case, see some "naked flesh." in a school. Good grief. I should have thought no one in Denmark should be offended by something so banal, but then things may have changed with recent events in the news. I hope not. I can't stand PC. A lot of it simply cowardice in face of bullying. And anyway, I thought anything goes in the arts. Now, compare what you are doing and what people see every day: all the really graphic images of blood and gore displayed, every day, on the TV; the promise of sex in our advertising ... just about ALL our advertising ! And there is definitely no shortage of naked butts, breasts and flailing limbs in the movies (in case your audience lives in an unconscious trance: every single Western movie figures a Joe Bloe and Miss So-and-So getting it on -- all this is just plain and simple lust, which we like to think of as "romance"....), and so on and so on. What can possibly offend you audience? So I say, this is your chance to make a stand in the name of art: don't allow yourself to be censored in this way. Your school's timidity should not stop you from achieving your goals and expressing yourself in the way you want. They should respect YOU, not some vague,possibility of disturbance of general opinion. If a Fatwah is pronounced against you, then you can be flattered by the company you share. Salman Rushdie is just one illustrious name, then, more recently all those cartoonists (artists, and good ones) at Charlie. Hopefully, it does not boil down to a question of a religious minority. You'll gain some measure of fame and the IBO will need to take a stand. Maybe that is a good thing for such a safe franchise.
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  20. Hey! I did my IOC last year and I received a Level 6! My teacher was really good as she provided us with an outline to follow for the commentary and guiding questions for the discussion. I have included the outline that she gave us. If you follow it, I am sure you will ace the commentary portion of the IOC. In regards to the discussion, as our teacher provided us with guiding questions, I was able to just practice and practice answering them. Remember 'quality over quantity' is key. Answering fewer questions but having a bomb answer will not only make the 10 minutes go by so much faster, but will also up your grade. If you have any questions or need help, I am more than happy to help. Good luck! Information for IOC.docx IOC-Planning-Sheet1.docx
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  21. 1) If you have a target university that you wanna get in, it is better to look at their requirements, because they may recommend you to take certain course. But it's also important to look at what you can do well at, because the overall score is the one that most universities care the most. 2) For subjects like geography, it would start easy and will get harder as the course goes. So it would be fine if you have no prior knowledge in geography. And it would be a great choice if you are strongly interested in geography. 3. Economics, business and management, ITGS, etc.. Those are some subjects offered in ib that may help you if you are going into a business program. Again, have a look of the university that you want to get in and see if there's any other recommendations. Also, chose a subject from group 6 (arts) would be nice if you are going a business program, because they like people being more created and open-minded.
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  22. Neither is more favoured. A mix of both kinds is encouraged. One or the other will do,of course; but I daresay it will be rather more interesting for your readers (in this case the History examiners) and a good habit in History, if you can include both -- especially if you are providing an alternative explanation to an event to that given by more traditional / accepted interpretations usually offered by the secondary sources. Presumably, a more subtle reading of primary sources would be required. Or first-hand accounts coming to light. There should be plenty of examples of that interplay of primary-secondary sources in the more scholarly history accounts (I'm thinking Barabara Tuchman in her book_Guns of August or anything by Keegan; or the academic journals, for that matter.)
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  23. Typically acknowledgments go at the beginning or the end. Either way they won't be considered part of the 4000 word limit as they are completely optional.
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  24. Almost. You don't actually analyse literary devices, you analyze the passage or poem. OK, so I'm being a bit pedantic, but it is nevertheless an essential point. The rest you got right: In the process of analyzing the passage you will of course need to identify and explain the effects and purposes of the literary devices. The literary devices are part of what makes the passage/poem work and that is, ultimately, what you are investigating. The two important questions are: How is a passage or poem made to mean? And why does it matter? The *significance* of the passage or of the authorial choices (preferably both) will be implied by your thesis. And that is about it. Now for the hard part of actually putting all this into practice. Good luck with your IOP!
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  25. Your teacher is right and was wise to tell you to not do that. I immediately thought "don't diagnose diseases" when I saw what you wrote. IB's particular brand of literature analysis depends on making claims about the extract's effect. Thus, making claims about characters' personal conditions won't help you. (Also, never try to make a medical diagnoses That's is a huge faux pas and examiners won't be forgiving.) What you want to do is make claims about the passage and its affect as a whole. If you want to talk about characterization, that's valid, but the characterization in the text should be used as evidence. If I recall correctly, your story is told in first-person (read it in middle-school ). Thus, everything that the character narrates could potentially be characterization as evidence. You would want to talk about the what the character says in his narration and what it shows (how is he/she characterized), but then – and this is important – you want to talk about its significance in the passage. You would do this by using this characterization (note that characterization is done by the author, not the narrator regardless of first-person/third-person) to claim that the author uses it to deliver a greater message ("theme" if complete story, "message" if extract) in the passage. This pattern/formula applies not only to characterization, but all literary devices. IB likes students to use literary devices to claim the theme/message/effect of a passage. Your original thesis is actually pretty close, and initially I was unsure what she wanted but now I'm pretty sure she wants you to talk about an overarching effect of the passage, just like I said in the previous paragraph. It seems like she wants you to make that one last step using what you have with your claims about the atmosphere and talk about how that relates to a theme (You will have to decide what that theme is). Also. I would recommend not using atmosphere and instead use mood or tone, which are two recognized literary devices (Remember, we're making IB happy here. Semantics. ) Don't confuse them though, because tone is how the narrator feels and mood is how the events in the passage would make an average everyday person feel (Particularly relevant in your story because let's just say the narrator has an unusual attitude towards murder). One possible path could be starting with characterization and then moving to tone and then to mood (going over the juxtaposition in the tone and mood) and finally talking about the effect of all this and allege your thesis. Whether you switch or stick with Tell-Tale Heart, I hoped this help. This advice serves for any IB Lit assignment. Talk more with your teacher and finalize things. Keep us updated. Good luck.
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  26. I'm going to give my input on this, and I too agree that #1 is a little tricky. First, @kw0573 is correct in that there are two ways to tackle this problem. The first is to consider the sides as having dimensions h by 2x and the front & back as having dimensions h by x. The second way is to just reverse the two dimensions. @FChaosi_ has done the method where the sides have dimensions h by 2x, although... This step is incorrect. The leading term should be 8/3x^2, not 2/3! Finding A'(x), setting A'(x)=0, and solving for x yields x=(49)^(1/3)/2, and h happens to be equal to this. The total cost function I wrote is: C(x)= x(2x)(3c)+x(h)(3c)+2x(h)(3c)(2)+x(h)(c)+x(2x)(c). This is equivalent to what @FChaosi_ has for the surface area multiplied by 3c, where c is the cost of the pine wood. I also multiplied by 3 to remove the fractions. Let c=0.6 (just a random test number) and find C(49^(1/3)/2)=48.2058658059. The method I used is to where the sides have dimensions h by x, which is also the method that @kw0573 seems to think is correct. This is implied (or was at least to me) as the "long" side would be used for the front (silly technicality, I know, but this is IB we're talking about). The cost function for this is similar to the one above and is given by C(x)= x(2x)(3c)+2x(h)(3c)+x(h)(3c)(2)+2x(h)(c)+x(2x)(c). We can make the same substitution for h, which is 12.25/(2x^2), and simplify C(x) to be: (12.25/x)(7c)+8(x^2)(c). C'(x)=c(16x-49(7)/(4x^2)). Solving for x gives 7/4, and h is 2. Much nicer numbers than the first! And if we let c=0.6 like before, and do C(7/4), we find that it is 44.1. This is lower than the first cost, so we should accept the dimensions x=7/4 dm and h=2 dm. For #2, we're going to write a bunch of smaller functions to model what's going on. First, let's write one for the total amount of apples after x months have passed (since September). This will be A(x)=10000-200x, as the amount decreases linearly, and 200 decay every month. Next let's write the price that we can sell them at after x months. In September, this is just 25, but it increases (linearly, again) by 5 cents per month. This gives P(x)=25+5x. Now let's look at the storage cost. This is going to be C(x)=350(100)x. I multiplied by 100 to convert to cents, because the cost is in dollars. The gross return will then be G(x)=A(x)(P(x))-C(x). In words, this tells us we have A(x) many apples selling for P(x) cents per apple, and we subtract the monthly storage cost. Let's simplify G(x) before we differentiate it. G(x)=(10000-200x)(25+5x)-350x=1000(50-x)(5+x)-35000x=1000(250+45x-x^2)-35000x. G'(x)=1000(45-2x)-35000. Setting G(x)=0 and solving for x, we get x=5 months, so next February.* *Disclaimer: I was never really that good at these cost problems, so something may be wrong here, but this is what makes sense to me!
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  27. Pretty sure this is late af but w.e. Spontaneous generation - theory that living things arise from non-living matter. Pasteur disapproved it using the broth experiment, he boiled the 2 broths to kill all the organisms then, he took 2 flasks, one was sterile, other was not. The control (non-sterile) flask had growth after a few days of being left in the open, while the other didn't. Abiogenesis - kinda similar to spontaneous gen., but this one relates more to the origin/creation of life. It basically asks, "where did the first living thing (cell) come from." Kinda disapproved since it's basically spontaneous gen. Biogenesis - THIS is actually the accepted theory, states that origin of life is from pre-existing cells. Pasteur, Redi Endosymbiosis - theory of the origin of eukaryotic cells from prokaryotic organisms. States that organelles like mitochondria and chloropast kinda merged in. For example, mitochondria and chloroplasts have their own DNA, evidence of this theory. Hope I helped lol
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  28. Sorry for being slightly pedantic, but the idea that Nazi experiments helped or advanced scientific knowledge knowledge is a completely false. The experiments were thinly disguised torture methods that gave inaccurate, biased, and unimportant information that largely only served to make the victims suffer. For a well-written and interesting discussion of the topic, this post on AskHistorians Reddit was superb.
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  29. Practising law in the US is very, very different from practising law in the UK. If you want to practise in the US eventually, you would have to complete your undergraduate degree in Lit/Creative Writing, then study for the LSAT (US Entrance Exam for Law Schools) and get into Graduate School for Law (because Law can only be studied in the US after you have completed an undergraduate degree). After you complete a three-year law degree in a US law school (this is called a JD), you then have to sit the Bar exam for the US State in which you want to live/practise and after clearing the Bar exam you can start practising law. It is very difficult to be a UK qualified lawyer or have a UK law degree and try to sell that to a US law firm to practise there. If you do complete a UK law degree and then work for the London office of a US law firm and perform really well, you could, maybe, push to be moved to one of the US offices. But this is not guaranteed and also, I would think, would depend on what area of law you want to practise in the US. Something like mergers and acquisitions or straightforward corporate law is much more easily transferred than say litigation, which is very country-specific. Also, if you're not a US citizen, it makes staying there long-term for work more challenging as you would need a US law firm to sponsor your visa. So things are tricky if the US is your aim. You would have to be very organised and high achieving in order to stand a chance with there, but if you're focused and determined that this is what you want and willing to take the financial risk, then go for it.
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  30. don't forget to do your minors in gif editing and dank meme studies
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  32. Interesting Topic! First, I do not think that grades determine our intelligence. Known there are roughly 16 personalities, but the school system only works for a few of those systems. That doesn't mean that the rest of us have a poor IQ. Schools only teaches us sooooooo little compare to what we will get to learn throughout our lives. And everyone would be at the top of the field they are good at/ comfortable at. Schools like to teach us the basic techniques like analyzing, expressing, that may help us in our jobs, and they want us to be extremely well-rounded. Yet, only a few students could make it, and they are not the only winners, we all are! You would notice that we would not use most of the thing we had learnt at school when we are at job, and we could still be successful. Our intelligence would only shown if we are at the right position. And there are way more skills would not be tested at school. For instant, your decisive when making a decision. And our personalities also contribute to how well we can do in school. Some people can sit there a whole and absorb all the information taught. But some people can't, not because they are not smart, but due to those information are not interested to them, therefore they have no passion learning it. But when it come to something they see as useful or meaningful, they would try so hard and master it. To sum up, school would only determine how well we are doing a current event or apply a skill, but our intelligence is determined by how well we can contribute the usage of our intelligence to the development of our society.
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  33. I think your teachers said the subjects you are doing = suicide is because all your high levels are science and math oriented, and most of people struggle with the sciences. However if you enjoy the subjects you are taking and confident with your previous performance on those subjects, you would be good. It's also important noting what your strength and limits, because that's how you would have a great performance in dp. If you are a science person and interested in applying science related program in university, your choice works perfectly.
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  34. This is spot on. You cannot examine it from a moral context as this is a history paper. Instead, focus on its effects and whether it helped or hurt the Japanese war effort. IB doesn't do well with intersectional stuff, and as much as they say they like students to be "inquiring", you are best off following their guidelines. I did something that veered from the orthodox on my History IA and I was severely marked down for it.
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  35. Interestingly enough, I got a notification about this topic just in time for my SAT scores. I should say I am disappointed by them, and feel quite stuck. I am applying to universities this following week. I do IB as well, and I must say, I am doing a lot better than my SAT score may imply. What I am trying to say is; I could complain about how grades do not determine one's intelligence, about how I have more capacity which I cannot reflect through SATs or any other standardized test. Doing that will not be fair though, because no one ever demonstrates any capacity by critisising the system. I think that it is something we should get over. If scores indicate something and hold merit in that regard then be it. No score will stop me from achieving. Basically, in the long-term, we will see that they aren't real obstacles to whatever we wish to acheive.
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  36. Look, I could be wrong here (the necessary preface to providing any IB advice, so I can't be held accountable if you fail ) but for a history research question, I think justifiable could potentially be problematic. It's very open ended. Justifiable how? Moral criteria comes to mind, but questions of whether or not something was moral isn't really something for a history IA (take it to TOK and knock yourself out). Justifiable under Japanese cultural norms? Etc etc. Personally, I would tack on just a bit to focus your research question. Something like "To what extent was the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour a justifiable attempt at preventing US interference in Japanese expansionism" . That would allow you to examine Japanese expansionist policy, their plans for south east Asia and the Pacific, how the United States pacific fleet could have been perceived as a threat to those interests (perspective is very important, potentially use a Japanese source here) given restrictions placed on Japan prior to the attack and finally what the outcome of a preemptive attack was perceived to be. Just my two cents on how you could focus the question, what you've got sounds good fam.
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  37. No. Besides, I'm not exactly sure why you should care about the combination being "weird" -- if anything, having diverse interests is an advantage. Math and Econ make a lot of sense in terms of your uni plans (as does Global Politics) and I can't see how IB physics would be any better than bio. If you like bio better, go for bio. Btw, IB physics isn't particularly quantitative. You just need to know a bunch of formulas and how to plug values into them.
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  38. In the actual exams, if I'm not wrong (since we did this for SL), you can ask for the answer booklets that you'd use in other exams. I don't know if Maths HL is the same, but in Maths SL we had two long answer questions, and you could just use those for working. That's what we did at least!
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  39. I think the points needed for those universities are updated. Most of the universities now have a lower standers, less points are needed. I think it's because they now knew IB is way harder than what they thought At least from what I know, to get into University of Waterloo's Math and Business program, you only need 32 points now.
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  40. This may sounds a little nerdy but, I finished most of my personal project over the summer of my grade nine year! And it was about quantum physics! I was sooooo surprised that I could actually write an essay on that! I think I even confused myself at the end But you know what? I laugh when my classmate complain they had to work on their personal project on top of the workload. So proud of myself of getting most of my project done before grade 10.
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  41. Hmm, that's interesting... Well, I realize that knowledge produced with difficulty would be impressive, and so a great respect is held for knowledge obtained with difficulty. People do like to be respected, and so it is only natural that many would hold a greater value for knowledge gotten through difficulty. However, here comes the issue of how you want to define difficulty in gaining knowledge. Now, for example, the idea that objects fall towards the ground due to gravity is a commonly-held idea and many think that as one only needs to observe falling objects to determine as much, it must not have been too difficult to develop the idea. But the thing is, in the past, people did not arrive at that conclusion as easily and it was many theories, such as Eratosthenes's idea of objects having a 'natural place', that existed before it became widely accepted that objects will fall towards the ground due to the force of gravity the Earth exerts on them. This theory of Newton's was hugely impressive both now and back when he developed it, but was it truly through difficulty that he arrived at the conclusion of gravity? After all, legend tells of the story of the falling apple and the instantaneous development of the theory of gravity. Obviously this cannot be accepted as a valid source, but it does suggest the discovery of gravity was not as difficult as one might think and only required a bit of thinking and logic on Newton's part. Sure, others were unable to develop the idea, but was what he did really that difficult? Rare, for sure, but difficult? Developing his theory was not particularly physically exerting, nor were crazy difficult tests used in the development of the theory; it was all simply cold, hard logic. Where to draw the line between knowledge that was obtained through difficulty and easily-obtained knowledge? I think exploring that in one part of your essay would be quite interesting. That's quite the topic you have there! Best of luck with your essay!!
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  42. Basic guide to writing the essay ReferenceThis guide is adapted from the works of Richard van de Lagemaat: http://www.cambridge...ets/pdf/TOK.pdf Writing a TOK Essay Tones of people freak out over the TOK essay when they see the topics. I know I did. It took me a lot of investigation, tips, and going to talk to my professor to figure out the process. In the end, my teacher gave me the best advice, which I have given bellow. It helped amazingly. Where do I start? What do I write? How many paragraphs should I have? How many examples should I have? What about counter-arguments? Can I use outside sources? How do I define terms? Do I even need to define them? All of these are common questions asked by TOK students. I have given the information bellow that I find most important for writing a solid, well-rounded, critical and organized essay. If anyone would like to add in advice or information, or give me suggestions of advice and information to add into this document, feel free, and I will get right on it. How to Remember the Assessment Criteria Keep in mind the Assessment Criteria when writing your TOK essay. Use it as a checklist throughout your writing process. Does your essay contain each criteria, A, B, C and D? A. Understanding knowledge issues You essay is focused on knowledge issues You have made links and comparisons You have only relevant information Your understanding of the prescribed topic is sophisticated B. Knower’s perspective Your thinking and reasoning is independent You demonstrate self-awareness You mention different perspectives about specific issues Your examples are varied, well-explained and relevant C. Analysis of knowledge issues Your writing style and organization demonstrates insight and depth Your main points have been justified You essay contains both arguments and counter-arguments Your essay clarifies assumptions and implications mentioned D. Organisation of ideas The essay is well-structured The key concepts are explained Your facts mentioned are accurate Your essay contains a Reference Page Remembering the each criteria throughout the writing process may be difficult; therefore, another method of keeping the basics in your mind while writing is by using the "4 Cs" explained below: CONTENT (criterion A)- incorporation of Knowledge Issues CREATIVITY (criterion B)- incorporation of Personal Thought CRITICAL THINKING (criterion C)- incorporation of arguments and counter-arguments CLARITY (criterion D)- well-structured essay Choosing a Question from the Prescribed Titles and Brainstorming When choosing a question for your essay from the IBO Prescribed Titles, make sure the question you choose can fulfill the following: You understand the question If you don't understand the question, than don't try to figure out what it means. Just don't choose that question! Choose something easier! You should be clear about what the question means, what knowledge issues it raises and what is and is not relevant to it. You are interested in the question How can you write about something you are not interested in? You will encounter many difficulties and also become very bored. Remember, one goal in writing an essay it to keep it interesting for the reader! You have something to say about the question Can you come up with knowledge issues, possible examples and explanations for the question? You need to display confidence in your essay, if you cannot identify it's features, you cannot display that confidence. Try not to choose a question that covers a topic you did not study in your TOK class. Now it is time to Brainstorm your ideas: Read exemplar essays Keep in mind the TOK diagram (if you have trouble remembering it, print it out and have it in front of you at all times) Keep in mind the Assessment Criteria or the "4 Cs" Jot down ideas that come to mind when thinking about the question Compare and contrast the ideas, than get rid of unimportant ideas. Think about how your ideas are related to each other Create a mind map to visualize your ideas, and connect them Start giving your main ideas sub-points Don't start writing by using a textbook with information. The essay is all about your ideas, and your reflection on the question. Writing and Organizing the Essay Now that you have brainstormed your ideas and have a good idea about what you want to write. Begin writing. Structure: Introduction Body Paragraphs Conclusion Introduction Tell the reader what you are going to do in the body paragraphs of your essay There are three steps to a solid introduction: have an attention grabber at the beginning of the introduction to hold the reader's attention explain what you understand by the question outline how you will approach the question and undertake the issues [*]In order to explain yourself, you should: write the question you are undertaking in your own words explain key terms/give definitions for key terms (in order to avoid ambiguity throughout your essay) state why the question is important [*]impose your own limits on the question (you can never cover everything, so choose the main fields you wish to work work with) Thesis Statement the fundamental claim you are making in your essay write a rough Thesis Statement before you start writing your Thesis Statement will most likely need to be changed a the end of your writing Paragraphs Purpose of the paragraphs (i.e. the body) of your essay- break down, and set apart major new points in your arguments Organization of the paragraphs of your essay- a group of arguments and evidence that have to do specifically with the point of the main argument being discussed in that specific paragraph How long should each paragraph be and how should they be or set-up? Make sure your paragraphs don't have any irrelevant information Major points will, obviously, be longer paragraphs; meanwhile, minor points will be shorter, possibly only 4-5 sentences Transition smoothly from paragraph to paragraph (i.e. from point to point). Use appropriate transition words and concluding sentences in your paragraphs to achieve this smooth transition Since it is a long essay, you may want to occasionally recap on what you have written, as to not lose the reader in many points, examples and information. Conclusion Wrap up your essay; do not end abruptly. Do not briefly restate what you have already said in your body paragraphs Formulate a new way to state your major insight/argument Mention unresolved issues Have a striking concluding sentence, giving the reader a positive view on your essays argument. Style Clarity Economy Precision Clarity- make sure the reader can understand what you are saying. Do not feel the need to use complicated words, which would brake the flow of your essay. Economy- make your essay flow, but also eliminate irrelevant adjectives and other words that are unnecessary and take up your limited word count Precision avoid clarifying too many words; people will get overwhelmed by definitions make sure to use language that is correct. Some words have subtle differences, others sometimes are inadequately used Key Features that Should Appear in Your Essay Content- Key Question: could your essay have been written by someone who has never taken a TOK class? If yes, than you have a problem: there is not enough TOK content (vocabulary, arguments, areas of knowledge, issues of knowledge, etc.) display TOK-type critical thinking abilities the central question: How do you know tell about the subject, not just facts compare and contrast difference sources, knowledge issues and areas of knowledge Personal Thought- Key Question: does the accumulation of your examples and personal thoughts to justify your arguments give your essay a distinctive voice? If your essay sounds bland and boring, you have a problem: go back, be creative and thoughtful. Demonstrate your personal thoughts through: specific positions you take and the points you make for the positions your well-organize, structured essay your comparisons your choice of examples your use of language your awareness of bias Definitions- Key Question: Does your essay begin with explanations/definitions of possible contested concepts you will be utilizing throughout your essay? If someone was to highlight the definitions in your essay, would they be in the introduction, before the reflection? Define the contested concepts Definitions should be at the beginning of the essay, and a reflection should end the essay Explain why the definition is important and what hangs on it. You may need to refine your definitions after you finish writing your essay. Steps for a good definition: look into typical examples find common characteristics test the concept Arguments- Key Question: Are your arguments a connected series of statements? Do your arguments gives premises to support your claim (your conclusion paragraph) "Therefore" test- put therefore in front of your statements, and the series makes sense, then it is an argument. Evidence- Key Question: Do you have examples for your arguments that give your reader a typical, real-lie event to identify with? As a rough guide, you should give supporting evidence if what you are saying is: central to your argument disputable or surprising. [*]The more that hangs on an assertion and the more disputable it is, the more evidence you should give in support of it. [*]Approach your sources critically: Who says? Do they have the relevant expertise? Are they trustworthy? Do they have a vested interest? What’s the evidence? How plausible is it? Do they show both sides? Do they use emotive language? Do other experts agree? Counter-arguments- Key Question: Did you give substantial counter-arguments and refute them successfully? Pretend like your essay is a dialogue: someone is trying to contradict your argument, and you are refuting them Once you have given a counter-argument, you will need to decide how it affects your original argument. There are two main types of response you can make: Refutation- reject the counter-argument, proving its mistakes, unlikeliness or unimportance Concession- You allow that there is some truth in the counter-argument and qualify your original argument to take account of it. Sound Reasoning- Key Question: Go through your essay and identify all of the arguments. Have they been properly justified? To have a well-justified argument, be careful for: Hasty generalization- generalizing from insufficient Black-and-white thinking- fallacy of going from one extreme to the other. Inconsistency- Check the overall consistency of your essay and ensure that your various points do not contradict one another. Depth- taking your analysis to an upper level; giving the essay weight Think about 5 main factors: Depth of dialogue try to not go back-and-forth between arguments and counter-arguments, and think of a response to the counter-argument and a counter-response to that. Think about: the quality as well as the quantity of such exchanges, at what point to bring them to a close. Weight of evidence The more supporting evidence you can give for your arguments the more conviction they will be. Relevant distinctions Introducing relevant distinctions will add subtlety and finesse to your argument. Key implications By exploring the implications of your argument, you show that you are thinking around the issue. Ask yourself what follows from the point you are considering. Background assumptions What assumptions am I making? Be willing to question them. Try not to confuse what is cultural and what is natural Breadth make connections consider both similarities and differences consider different perspectives think beyond your own assumptions bring in hidden assumptions in your own thinking Examples use varied and effective examples Keep in mind when giving examples: Hypothetical examples Clichéd examples Representative examples Varied examples Brevity of examples Examples vs statistics- use both if you want Quotations According to the IBO definition, plagiarism is ‘the representation of the ideas or work of another person as the candidate’s own’. You will not be awarded your IB Diploma if it is discovered that you plagiarized your essay. To avoid plagiarism, the IBO says that: ‘Candidates must always ensure that they acknowledge fully and in detail the words and/or ideas of another person.’ Be sure to, therefore, reference (give credit) to any quotations written in your essay.
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  43. Hey there. The argument went like this. If God doesn't exist, objective moral values don't exist. However, objective moral values do exist. Therefore God exist. The key word is objective. It's true what you said, that everyone can have their own moral values even if God doesn't exist, but that wasn't the point. If God doesn't exist, there are no objective moral values, meaning that they really are true, independent of what people think. For example, torturing an innocent person is wrong, even if some people think it's okay. So if God doesn't exist, things like the Holocaust weren't really wrong; it would just be a matter of subjective opinon. But obviously our moral experience tells us that the holocaust really was wrong. Thus there is an objective moral value, and thus God exists. Furthermore, you even seem to affirm that objective moral values and duties do exist when mentioned a couple things that seemed wrong. The ironic thing is that if God doesn't exist, you wouldn't be able righteously complain about these things because everything would just be a matter of human opinion.
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  44. Looking back at my IB years, I really wish I dropped to certificate or transferred to the AP school. It wasn't because of grades or bad teachers, but because I realised that my post-secondary pathway didn't align well with the IB program offered at my high school. I think my school had a very 'pre-med' and humanities focused program, but did not offer a strong background for engineering. There was no subject choice other than choosing HL History or online Econ/Psych/ITGS (lotsa $$$) for Group 3, whereas AP and the provincial system offered loads of choices and electives. I still got into my dream school, but SL Math and non-IB summer school physics were a huge obstacle in first term.
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  45. Not taking HL Maths shouldn't be much of a problem except for Cambridge as @apoello highlighted. A senior from my school 2 years back got into UCL Biomedical Science with Maths SL, and BioChemistry HL. There are too many factors taken into account from one application that it'd rarely come down towards taking or not taking Maths HL as the winning factor for deciding which student is better than another. Generally it takes longer time to be a full fledged medical doctor by studying in US/Canada (approx. 8 years needed). In the UK, 6 years is usually the amount of time needed to get an MD. It might be more expensive monetarily, but cheaper time-wise. Something to take into account. You take the MCAT for graduate-level medicine entry for US Schools, once you've finished undergraduate education and received your Bachelors. You'll need to take UKCAT in the very near future to apply for undergraduate medicine in the UK. Also, it's noteworthy that upon finishing a 6-year programme in medicine in the UK, you won't need to take the MCAT or any other tests anymore. It's just 1-2 more years of working at a clinic for experience and you're set. Personally, if I plan to go to medicine, I'd choose the UK if mostly because it's a faster route. However, there's no backing out – it's going to be painful if you're 2 years into the program and realise medicine isn't something you want to do. The U.S. gives you more freedom – most people take a biological science/mathematics/chemistry as their undergraduate major that can be applicable to other fields and should they still want to pursue medicine, can then take the MCAT to apply for graduate medical schools. If you're interested in the US, John Hopkin's Biomedical Engineering Program is the unparalleled pre-med program in the US – upon graduating, it'll be much easier for you to gain entry into its graduate medical school, which is arguably the best in the entire world (assuming your MCAT, GPA, and outside leadership activities are solid as well). Any other high-ranking graduate medical school e.g. MIT/Stanford/Harvard/UCSF will also be less painful to get in as the prestige derived from graduating JHU's BME is just so WOW. And should you decide you no longer want to pursue, well that's fine, 'cause you have a degree in arguably the most difficult scientific field from the most rigorous and prestigious program for it that finding a job in engineering/pharmaceuticals/research will be relatively easier. Edit: think thread just went off topic
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  46. As someone who took HL Biology and History, I can tell you there is a lot to memorise, and you have the fun of getting HL Psych too which is a special form of torture in itself, apparently. I think, in part, you should look at your subjects in terms of a) How much you enjoy them, b) If there are particular requirements for universities, and c) How difficult you find the subjects. When you enjoy a subject, it makes memorisation a little less painful. Case in point, whilst this anecdotal, I enjoyed all my HL subjects, and hence, whilst I was frustrated just before exams with the amount of content, I wasn't like some other people who were taking the HL and clearly quite depressed with the memorisation. On the other hand, my SL subjects were almost equally annoying for me, particularly French, when technically your HL subjects should be worse, but for me, French was the bane of my existence. Honestly, I'd say that Bio HL and History HL is better than History HL and Psych HL - I don't think anyone in our History class took Psych HL as well. To be fair though, I was the only one taking Biology HL in our History HL class but to each their own. As @sodonewithib said, it depends on what you think you'll feel better about. Good luck!
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  47. I live in Sweden- Europe’s most welcoming country for refugees. I would love to help people running from wars and poverty. But the problem is that these people have different cultures and that brings segregation into a society. I have many friends coming from the Middle East and I have heard many of them say that it's wrong to have sex before marriage and that women who aren't virgin before marriage are wh*res. My friend's mother wears a niqab and she forced my friend to start wearing the hijab. I was completely shocked when I found out but I was even more surprised when I noticed that our other friends who come from Syria/Lebanon didn't care much and acted like it was a normal thing. Many people in Sweden with immigrant backgrounds do not inegrate well and are sort of isolated. There are also thousands of immigrants here who integerate well into society and get along with Swedes, I am not saying that all immigrants are alienated. According to SCB, there are higher crime rates in areas where the proportion of immigrants is high. And that makes sense if you think about it since higher crime rates are common among those who have experienced war/trauma/poverty. Also, most of the refugees are male which brings imblance in the population. I would love to help others, but if that means that my future children will be around other children who think that it's wrong to show your hair, then I will pass.
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  48. Start with the intro, write three-four thematic paragraphs and a conclusion. It's not rocket science, and you'll do great. Good luck!!
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  49. To me, and to many others I'm sure, this is a negative topic. That being said, I don't want you to feel that it's a bad question to ask, this very same question has always been with us since the beginning. Whether we find purpose in religion, science, or still search for it, nobody will ever know for sure, in this life, what we are meant to do. But imagine this, what would happen if we did learn our purpose? If some divine being came down to Earth and gave us our divine purpose, what would come next. I suppose we'd probably work forever to achieve this goal, working endlessly and tirelessly against our limited time on this planet to complete our mission. Now let's say we achieved this goal, then what? Would we then truly be meaningless, or would we simply return to how we are now, wondering what to do. The fact is that our own self awareness is what gives us our sense of insignificance about our own race. Only when we have a goal, and work so hard at it that we develop a type of tunnel vision, does the emptiness left by this question begin to be filled. When you claim that the accomplishments of those who died now mean nothing, or at least become forgotten, I must disagree. It is a depressing thought to say the least, but I feel you're seeing it from the wrong angle. Anybody who does something only for the purpose of being remembered would likely be disappointed if they were still with us today. The way I see it, there are two main categories of people, those who seek a purpose externally, and those who seek it within themselves. If any of you IB students have a TOK class, then you know that, even though I say I am real, and you say you are real, really all I can be sure of is that I am here, and I am aware. It certainly is bold to say that everything outside of my own mind is only constructed to help me understand the reality within my own mind, but still, it is possible. People who see this way may find purpose in their life better. They can create something, and appreciate it for themselves, instead of seeking approval by some external consciousness. Don't interpret this idea as the difference between confident and insecure individuals. I've met many very confident people who still value others' judgement, which everyone should to a degree, and I've seen very insecure people who are only insecure because of the way they see themselves. To summarize, my main point is that we give ourselves purpose. If you wait for a purpose, you'll turn to dust before one ever reaches you. If you completely submit yourself to anything beyond your own interests, it is the wrong purpose. It is wrong because it is not your purpose, but instead somebody else's projected onto you. Simply by saying, "this is what I am meant to do," makes it your purpose, and nobody can contest it, though they may try. You think, therefore you are, now go out and be!
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  50. Sup people of the IB. I found a short guide that I wrote a while ago that deals with stress and procrastination. I'll add more to it later (the irony but it is late ) so hopefully it's helpful. There's more to come if I remember Stress Firstly stress at school is mainly caused by lack of organisation. So sorting that out could half or even eliminate your 'i want to rip the hair out of my head' feeling! How to organise work: Invest in a folder if you write notes with a note book and use folder separators to make things easier.This makes losing notes a lot less likely because they are in a named folder. Plus it makes you feel really professional If you're feeling that things are getting to you, just step back for a little bit and think. You don't need to be getting overly stressed because that hinders your work and can result in tears, this isn't helpful to your development because it lowers your confidence. Try drinking some water, taking a short break from revision or going for a walk. Clear your mind. Procrastination This thing is horrible. I hate it loads and i have a half decent way of sorting it out. Just know that you cannot get rid of it completely otherwise you'll probably end up not enjoying life. No one can seize EVERY SINGLE opportunity they have to work. It's just not realistic haha The reason why procrastination happens is because there are two parts of your brain that helps this. ( I cannot remember their names, forgive me for that) One part see's the short term benefit of everything, like going on facebook or staring into the sky. This part is much bigger than the part that see's the long term benefit of working now. Plus the long term benfit part (the determined one) gets tired quickly. Ok, imagine yourself as two people. 'present' you, and 'future' you. 'Present' you wants to put off work and say i'll do it tomorrow until your you've started everything too late. This would make you think, 'yea i promise i'll do it tomorrow but now i'll watch tv' or 'now i'll stare at pictures of yoda riding a cat'. Do you notice this trend? It happens a lot. What you need to remember is that, it isn't now you that will be feeling the consequences of your procrastination, it'll be future you. (i hope this is making sense so far) You need to look to future you and think that you want to have less work so you'll do it now. Procrastination isn't because you're lazy, it's because you're weak in the sight of distractions (that sounds mean but everyone gets distracted for the reason i stated above) Keep your work neat.You don't want to be revising and realise that you cannot read half of anything that you've written. Some care will go a long way.You don't need to write full sentences when making notes, just something that can remind you what was taking place in class.Try organising your work daily.This further reduces the chances of losing sheets and notes, hole punch it and keep it safe. You'd be surprised how much they can help Lessen the distractions!Disable facebook or move the facebook app from the homepage of your phoneMute your computer so you aren't hearing all sorts of notificationsClear the cookies from your computer so you have to enter your password in everytime you want to log into something (but make sure you remember them haha) This makes logging into stuff an added effort so you're more inclined to just not bother and start your work.And if you need to just ban yourself from IBS and TSR (if you use it too)Give yourself motivation!Put pictures up of what you want to achievePlan a little treat you can have ONLY if you've completed a certain amount of work... not if you've done something for a specific timeIt's too easy to say 'i've read for half an hour, time to chill'. You could've just been sitting there [*]Look into what you want to do and what you need to do to get there My next point is that not all procrastination is bad! So when you feel lazy instead of refreshing the facebook homepage, read an article from the news or a page from a book relating to your subjects. Plus don't mistake procrastination for having a break, breaks are good! they keep your sanity in tact Ok the end is here! After multiple facebook references, unnecessary emoticons, incomplete sentences and poor humour that is. I really do hope someone finds this helpful as this took me a while to write but maybe it'll be worth it Just remember, a little stress isn't bad and taking breaks isn't the same as procrastination. I'll be adding more to this as things come to me. **** Here is a prioritized to do list: PrioritizedToDolist.pdf You list all your tasks and label them A - F, with A being the most important and anything after D generally something you can put off until you've finished everything before that. Stay concentrated and it won't seem like that much of a daunting task!
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