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d3athlig3r

Literary analysis in English A1 EE

Hello all,

I'm doing an EE on a novel, studying the portrayal of a certain theme (transformation) in it. Now, in analyzing this theme, do I look at the literary techniques used in quotes which reflect the theme OR do I look at the meanings of these quotes?

For example, here is one excerpt from my extended essay (on the theme of 'Transformation'):

"In George’s case, a very prominent change in his life occurs in his becoming a Horologist, a tinkerer of clocks. His love for the machines and time spent surrounded by them overwhelms his mentality to an extent that as he is hallucinating, he awoke to “a silence [which] he experienced almost as a noise…All of the clocks in the room had wound down. He felt the inside of his own chest and had a sudden panic that it, too, had wound down.” Harding’s (the Author) use of objectification emphasizes the bond George has formed with his passion, the clocks. This also outlines the notion that when one becomes acquainted with something for a long time, it changes them, and becomes a driving force in their life."

The first underline is of literary technique analysis

The second underline is of meaning analysis

So my question is, which approach is expected from me by the markers? Or do they expect a mingling of both? if so, which should I do more, literary technique analysis OR meaning analysis?

Thanks ;)

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From what I understand with the English A1 EEs is that they expect both. Just make sure that when you mention a literary technique, you analyze what you've said about it before moving on the the meaning of the quote (which you will also need to analyze what you've said about it), and vice versa (literary technique doesn't have to be first) ;)

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From what I understand with the English A1 EEs is that they expect both. Just make sure that when you mention a literary technique, you analyze what you've said about it before moving on the the meaning of the quote (which you will also need to analyze what you've said about it), and vice versa (literary technique doesn't have to be first) ;)

Hmm, should both types of analyses be present after every quote I mention from the novel?

I guess since I am analysing the portrayal of the theme of transformation, it would only make sense to include the literary techniques. The problem though is that this author doesn't rely much on them, I mean what techniques can someone pull out of a quote like this:

"I had thought that he was a clock, was like a clock was like a spring in a clock when it breaks and explodes when he had his [epileptic] fits. But he was not like a clock or at least was only like a clock to me. But to himself? Who knows? And so it is not he who was like a clock but me."

This EE promises to be a pain in the neck ;)

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From what I understand with the English A1 EEs is that they expect both. Just make sure that when you mention a literary technique, you analyze what you've said about it before moving on the the meaning of the quote (which you will also need to analyze what you've said about it), and vice versa (literary technique doesn't have to be first) ;)

Hmm, should both types of analyses be present after every quote I mention from the novel?

I guess since I am analysing the portrayal of the theme of transformation, it would only make sense to include the literary techniques. The problem though is that this author doesn't rely much on them, I mean what techniques can someone pull out of a quote like this:

"I had thought that he was a clock, was like a clock was like a spring in a clock when it breaks and explodes when he had his [epileptic] fits. But he was not like a clock or at least was only like a clock to me. But to himself? Who knows? And so it is not he who was like a clock but me."

This EE promises to be a pain in the neck ;)

That quote has:

Repetition ("clock").

Similes: epileptic fits compared to clock spring

Rhyme: the way everything is stated almost sounds like its rhyming: he, me constantly used

You don't necessariy have to have both types of analysis after each quote. Sometimes one is relevant to the point you are making and the other is irrelevant, sometimes both will be important. It is up to you to assess which information and analysis is vital is specific sections and ideas of your EE. If you don't see any literary devices, don't say anything about them. If you see no deeper "meaning" don't mention it. Up to you :)

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I think only the first two techniques would be related to my essay question.

And yeh, you're right, it would look like I'm trying too hard to bring techniques and meanings out of no where. I would assume the markers want a straight-to-the-point attitude in the essay.

Thanks ;)

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I would assume the markers want a straight-to-the-point attitude in the essay.

Thanks ;)

Exactly... get rid of all irrelevant info. Your 4000 words should be hardcore analysis...

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