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ravenransom14

IOP .....HELP

I have to present my IOP in 2 weeks and i have no idea how to start. the book I chose was James Baldwin's "Notes of A Native Son" and I'm not sure if my prospal should be an essay, chart or power point.

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I did mine just last week, I used powerpoint and It went well :)

follow the rubric like crazy!! It should be your bible! when using powerpoint make sure you only use quotes as text or very minimal words it makes it more visually appealing and can be fun. like for justice as a point have superman drop into the slide

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I have to present my IOP in 2 weeks and i have no idea how to start. the book I chose was James Baldwin's "Notes of A Native Son" and I'm not sure if my prospal should be an essay, chart or power point.

Hey! First thing first: Dont freak out about the IOP! Of all your IAs, this is probably going to be the easiest one, since it is the one you have more freedom to choose. As you probably know already, it addresses works read in Part 4 of the course and the possibilities that come with it are almost infinite. I did my IOP on "Perfume: The story of a murderer" by Patrick Süskind and talked about how the different characters perceived and defined Jean Baptiste's (the protagonist) psychopathology. I got a 28/30.

Depending on what you want to do, the power-point will really just be a support for what you are about to say. It is supposed that it can be a creative representation as well, but I decided to go for the safe size and presented an analysis type of work. In the powerpoint I included some pictures and important quotes that supported my point, but the whole presentation was explained by me.

AVOID falling into a monotonic explanation. Even if you are (kind of) jeopardizing your marks for language, try to use common expressions or interesting metaphors and rhetorical questions that show that you attempt to grab your audience's attention. If you are going to go into an analysis or presentation that involves the consideration of a certain concept, define your terms at the start of the IOP, it is really important so that everyone has the same concept in mind.

Try to show in-depth knowledge of the work or works you chose. Don't present superfluous analysis or recognition of patters. Interpretation and understanding of the author's decisions are a big part of it. You should be able to portray this even in a creative approach.

Best of lucks!

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You needn't rely on the traditional Ppt. Presentation as there are lots of more exciting (creative) choices, which will involve your audience perhaps a little more. Have you checked these out?

The individual presentation may be done in a pair or as part of a small group of students. In that case, each student must give an individual presentation 10-15 minutes in length that can be individually assessed by the teacher.

- A critique of the students own writing that has been produced in the style of one of the literary genres studied

-A performance or a pastiche of a poem being studiedthis activity should be followed by some explanation and discussion of what the student attempted to do

- An account of the students developing response to a work

* The examination of a particular interpretation of a work

-The setting of a particular writers work against another body of material, for example, details on social background or political views

-The presentation of two opposing readings of a work

-A monologue or dialogue by a character at an important point in the work

-Reminiscences by a character from a point in later life

-An authors reaction to a particular interpretation of elements of his or her work in a given context (for example, a critical defence of the work against a charge of subversion, or immorality, before a censorship board)

*****

Note: If you choose a creative presentation, you should provide a rationale.

So you can do a dramatization, pastiche, author interview (radio show, academic exchange in front of an audience...), some of the best IOP involved classmates playing the part of a character in the story etc..or arguing with the audience (just think of Nabokov's defence against a charges of lasciviousness in his book, _Lolita_ ... Banned in many schools for portraying a child molester sympathetically).. Good stuff.

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