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ibibib1022

Importance of Studying History?

For my historical investigation (my question is To what extent was American entry into the Second World War a direct result of the attack on Pearl Harbour?), I have to discuss the importance of my question and I can't seem to place it..

Should I talk about how the attack on Pearl Harbour gave way to the development of anti-Japanese sentiments and the Japanese-American internment?

Or should I discuss the importance of studying the causes of a war? I have a feeling I should do the second one (I'm open to other suggestions too :)) but the only problem is that I don't know the answer... Could anybody help me out? Thank you :)

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I'd think that you need to talk about the significance that Pearl Harbor caused the US to enter the war to whatever extent you conclude. The importance of your question is what it might imply, I think, and you should look into that. That's what I thought of first. I would talk about real causes versus causes that a government uses to sound good because I think it's pertinent to the Peal Harbor situation. I'd talk about the opinions of the general public and how strong they might be in influencing policy, as well. Things like what. What made Pearl Harbor a significant cause of the US entry into WW2 is what your paper talks about. Now for the importance of your paper, I would take what you showed and explain what we can learn from this. I tend to go toward the route of "human nature" and how history reveals it, but this isn't the only way you could go. You could talk about the importance of studying causes or the consequences of Pearl Harbor in terms of internment camps and the atmosphere in the US toward Japanese. I'm a bit biased toward human nature, though :) I guess the importance of studying the causes of war is what it shows about human nature. What really causes us to join a war, and then maybe how does the original purpose change [i'm thinking Korea and Vietnam during the Cold War]? Again, I'm biased... :)

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I'd think that you need to talk about the significance that Pearl Harbor caused the US to enter the war to whatever extent you conclude. The importance of your question is what it might imply, I think, and you should look into that. That's what I thought of first. I would talk about real causes versus causes that a government uses to sound good because I think it's pertinent to the Peal Harbor situation. I'd talk about the opinions of the general public and how strong they might be in influencing policy, as well. Things like what. What made Pearl Harbor a significant cause of the US entry into WW2 is what your paper talks about. Now for the importance of your paper, I would take what you showed and explain what we can learn from this. I tend to go toward the route of "human nature" and how history reveals it, but this isn't the only way you could go. You could talk about the importance of studying causes or the consequences of Pearl Harbor in terms of internment camps and the atmosphere in the US toward Japanese. I'm a bit biased toward human nature, though :) I guess the importance of studying the causes of war is what it shows about human nature. What really causes us to join a war, and then maybe how does the original purpose change [i'm thinking Korea and Vietnam during the Cold War]? Again, I'm biased... :)

ooohh I've never thought about it that way.. Thank you so much for your help!! ;)

P.S. This is for my analysis.. Do you suggest I include anything else?? thanks again!:P

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