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Sandwich

Tips for A1 Individual Oral Presentation

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Isn't it called individual oral presentation? So it does not have to be interactive at all.

When you write your notes, I suggest you are extra detailed for the introduction part, since that's when you're going to be the most nervous.

Don't forget literary features and especially their effects.

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Isn't it called individual oral presentation? So it does not have to be interactive at all.

When you write your notes, I suggest you are extra detailed for the introduction part, since that's when you're going to be the most nervous.

Don't forget literary features and especially their effects.

Just looked it up in the syllabus and you're quite correct! We always referred to it as interactive in lessons. I feel vaguely ashamed I made it all the way through 2 years of IB without ever looking it up, to be honest! xP Fixed now.

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Isn't it called individual oral presentation? So it does not have to be interactive at all.

When you write your notes, I suggest you are extra detailed for the introduction part, since that's when you're going to be the most nervous.

Don't forget literary features and especially their effects.

Just looked it up in the syllabus and you're quite correct! We always referred to it as interactive in lessons. I feel vaguely ashamed I made it all the way through 2 years of IB without ever looking it up, to be honest! xP Fixed now.

Well, most other oral are called "interactive something", so it's a fairly easy mistake to make.

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That's a brilliant list, Sandwich. Here's something from my experience.

Choosing the type of topic can be hard.

There are three basic categories that I'm familiar with.

1) A formal lecture type deal where the presenter speaks on the topic, and the audience listens.

2) A group discussion, where the presenter talks about the topic and then asks engaging questions about it to the class. [You have to prepare significantly for this because the class might take the discussion to places you haven't considered, so while it's fun, it'll be hard if you're not paying attention to the discussion or if you're not really familiar with the material and you're not good at being flexible.]

3) A creative piece that shows analysis and interpretation like an interview, skit that shows something not in the book, re-enactment of a scene, a poem or letter written by one of the characters, etc [This one's hard because you are creating something, so you're devoting a lot of time and effort into the original aspect, but you also have to show that you're critically analyzing the work. You can do this if you're creating a new scene by putting care into the characters' dialogue, expressions, body language, costumes, tone of voice, etc. It's a lot to consider, but it can be a great deal of fun to watch and make.]

These certainly don't constrict what you have to do. They're just examples and guidelines, but you've got a lot of freedom here. I did an informal lecture-type deal. I started off with some questions and played off how the class felt about the villains of the two books I was doing my IOP on. Then I just discussed what I thought, with references to the novels and some culture. I wanted to just be able to talk about what I found interesting. I didn't want it to be formal. My language was even less formal than the way I wrote this post, which helped me worry less. And I rehearsed it a lot, so I pretty much memorized what I wanted to say because I wanted to impress someone... (cough, cough) :)

Also, this a random-ish thing, but I suggest you stick to a max of comparing two works. With three works, you're pressed for time if you try to go into great depth/analysis, so you might not get the points you need. I didn't even know doing an IOP on one work was an option. Just don't do more than two. My teacher said don't do more than three, but if you've got something to say, then you'll realize that the more you think about it, the more you have to say. And you have to make the presentation between 10 and 15 minutes long.

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Good list!

Here are some things that helped me for the IOP(This might repeat things that have been already stated)

1. DO not procrastinate! Get it done quickly enough so that you have plenty of time to rehearse your presentation. This means starting as early as possible.

2. Rehearse at least five times before your presentation date. This will allow you to work out any kinks in your presentation.

3. Use academic language in a clear manner when defining your interpretations. Make sure you know what you are saying. It is key!

4. Look the graders and students in the eye, and be calm. It will make you seem more human and solidify your composure.

5. While studying and preparing, BREATH! Being cool, calm, and collected while preparing will help maintain the quality of your interpretations.

6. In terms of the interpretation itself, it cannot be too specific, or too vague. Make sure you can back your arguments with evidence from the text. Be logical.

7. Use textual evidence and refer to it during the presentation. Enough said.

8. When you rehearse, time yourself to make sure you are within the time range.

9. Do not try to cram info into your presentation. This will make you rush.

10. I cannot stress rehearsals enough. The more of them you do the less nervous you will be. Your articulation will be more fluid.

11. Choose a topic you like. If you do not like the literature you study in class in any way, at least try to make it fun. It will help.

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The most important is probably to analyse the techniques whether you are studying English or Chinese literature, how and why the authors use that technique and aspect.

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so i was completely confused on what to do for my IOP presentation and was desperately searching this website for at least 1 hour.

finally, i found this post from 2 years ago about how to make a stellar IOP.

you can find it here:

it is a freaking lifesaver, i hope it helps others too!

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1. Topics can be quite general

I found (and my teacher agrees) that the narrower the field, the better you do. With too wide a field you run the risk of missing something important out. Our school had a student do his IOP on the importance of shoes in a novel.

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I would suggest people to have a powerpoint presentation for three reasons.

It is very easy to orally practice once you have made your powerpoint. First it might go a little rustily but I promise, it won't take more than a hour until you get perfect!

Secondly, you can easily estimate how much time your presentation will take. It is not that hard to hold a presentation for 10-15 mins, shorter presentations are harder.

Last but not least :crying:, You will feel much less nervous because your audience will not look at you which perhaps could feel more comfortably when you're standing out there in front of an ugly audience!

Good luck!, (I have only done a test IOP)

Edited by IB-Adam
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Also, a powerpoint is good to have because you won't forget where you are in your presentation! I used a powerpoint to show my main points and supporting quotes to the class, while I had an explanation for everything written in my own notes :)

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I wrote out every word of my IOP and got 28/30. Teachers frown upon reading your IOP word for word, but there's actually nowhere where you can be penalized, so who cares if they don't like it?

I did my IOP on The Edible Woman and I talked about how Margaret Atwood uses the character Ainsley to create disdain for selfish feminists. I reread the entire novel and copied down all the relevant quotations. I then tried to incorporate every aspect I could of my research into the 15 minute presentation. I tied it all back to my thesis that Atwood creates disdain as she satirizes Ainsley.

In about 15 minutes, I put together a simple power point.

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That's unusual. Or perhaps it's my school that was unusual, but many of the points for Presentation/Language including coherence, persuasiveness, structure, register and style also took into account your ability to speak unaided, as if you read off a sheet you can't do any of those things quite as well as somebody who is engaging and fluent. I suppose it wasn't so much the speaking unaided as the engagement aspect. People with decent presentations who nevertheless read word for word from sheets were very heavily penalised in my class :blink: I don't think any of them got above 20. We did several practice presentations before the real one and people's marks improved largely in line with their presentation skills!

It's interesting that those criteria must have been interpreted differently. I suppose people ought to make sure what their individual teacher's approach is before choosing one over the other, perhaps.

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Hey.. im doing my IOP on Interpreter of Maladies by Jhumpa Lahiri. my topic is based on symbolism of america and india int he stories. But the problem im facing is trying to figure out exactly what symbolism means! I mean what TYPE of points can i include under it :S ???

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Hey.. im doing my IOP on Interpreter of Maladies by Jhumpa Lahiri. my topic is based on symbolism of america and india int he stories. But the problem im facing is trying to figure out exactly what symbolism means! I mean what TYPE of points can i include under it :S ???

I haven't read the novel :(

Symbolism is a literary device in which an image or action that stands for more than itself. Like, a pile of books may remind me of the IB, the shiny head of my math teacher, rows of lockers in hallways, memories of failed smartboards. A symbol is different from a simile or metaphor in the way that similes/metaphors name connections between seemingly dissimilar images, a symbol suggests a range of connections. As a result, not all symbols may be understood by everyone.

Symbols can be of two types, personal ( which only mean something to you) and universal ( which are common to everyone. aka archetypes). An example of an archetype would be the connection between spring and rebirth.

Hope you got what you were looking for!

( Source: "The Discovery of Poetry" Frances Mayes)

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Yes, do make a powerpoint, but a couple cautions:

1. DO NOT READ OFF YOUR POWERPOINT. It's boring, and probably worse than reading of your paper. The powerpoint should be used for visual reinforcement, and maybe a couple bullet points maximum. I'm taking about the water motif in Lord of the Flies and a selection of poetry, and the powerpoint is being used to reinforce what I'm saying about imagery and symbolism.

2. Make sure you know when to change slides. If you're using cue cards, but your slide changes on there. I have seen presentations before where they switch slide and either go back, continue talking even though the slide no longer has anything to do with what they're saying, or skip ahead and lose fluidity to keep up with slide changes.

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what i found useful is to find a theme in your passage and as you go through your text and annotate it link it to the theme

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I wrote out every word of my IOP and got 28/30. Teachers frown upon reading your IOP word for word, but there's actually nowhere where you can be penalized, so who cares if they don't like it?

That's strange. My teacher says that before, the way you held your presentation (with tone, eye-contact, enthusiasm etc) was not in the marking criteria, so it wouldn't affect your grade. Now they have changed that, she says (and looks very pleased) :(

Oh, well. I suppose there are more marks to gain from this change than to loose. And also, it makes sense. No one wants to listen to someone whispering behind a sheet of paper, not in IB nor in real life (e.g. politics).

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I am doing my IOP to characterize Elizabeth, Jane, and Lydia. But I need a creative idea on how to start the monologue.

I am going to show their characters by the letters they wrote to each other about Lydia's scandal but I don't know how to start it.

My teacher gave me an idea that Elizabeth should be looking back on the old letters she saved but if I do that i am not sure how to not make the audience confused about who is talking. Shouldn't I have an introduction like a narrator introducing the scene? Help please....I have to present this really soon....

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The IOP isn't prescriptive. e.g. You can give a 20 sec intro on what you're doing; then do the monologue; then explain the significance of what you have done. Someone in my class did that and it sounded really good (but you need to make sure you focus on why your monologue's in the style of the work you've studied).

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Thank you that was really helpful and I did not know that...but what I was asking was that I am doing for my IOP is a skit of a exchange of letters between the sisters Elizabeth, Jane, and Lydia. But I need a way to make sure that the audience is not confused to who is talking. So I said that Elizabeth was looking back at her old letters but I am not sure how to make the transitions.

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Thanks so much for the tips. They are really helpful!

I'm actually doing my IOP this coming Friday.

Pretty nervous but I'm sure I'll do fine. Again, thanks! :)

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Guys, if you dont know what kind of presentation to do i advice you to do a creative one :)

Its very fun which will allow you to work hours on it without getting bored or so.

I did in my German Higher Level a monologue of a character shortly before his death, reflecting his thoughts about the world and what went wrong, what he did wrong etc... it was really fun writing the monologue and adapting Schiller's language in "Emilia Galotti" and then i prepared the legitimation of my monologue to prove it and at the end i got 29/30 points.

very proud of myself!

but guys seriously, something analytical is ok too but its really not that fun and you will spend less time on it probably. One girl in my class did a movie and got full marks so thats a good shot too.

Main advice: Just put really a lot of effort in then you'll be fine

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I can't seem to stress this enough for many people doing their IOPs and IOCs.

Be SUCCINCT. Never overextrapolate upon a single or multiple ideas. Make your point, support it and explain how it is significant, and move on.

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