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Butterflier

Extended Essay HELP!

I need some help with starting my extended essay please!

The topic I have chosen to 'study' is: 'The expat child – unique problems vs. unique privileges/opportunities' using a psychological point of view.

One of the problems I have with this is that I don't study Psychology as a subject at school as it is not provided, but I am really dedicated to this topic as I am a TCK (third culture kid)/expat.

If it is possible that someone can give me some pointers on how to start writing and how to link it into the psychology syllabus, it would be a big help.

I do have a printout of the psychology syllabus and have done lots of research into the topic I wish to write about in my extended essay

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it is strongly recommended not to undertake an extended essay in a subject you do not study

by doing so, you will have A LOT on your plate but good luck anyway

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it is strongly recommended not to undertake an extended essay in a subject you do not study

by doing so, you will have A LOT on your plate but good luck anyway

^^ the above poster is right. It also states very specifically in the Extended Essay guide that you're strongly advised not to do one in Psychology if you have not studied the subject for IB as, even if your content is alright, your approach almost certainly won't be unless you're used to it. Other subjects don't have this problem, but a select few (to my knowledge, just Psychology and Philosophy) have this advice written by them in the EE Guide, and I would certainly say it's a little bit foolhardy to ignore it. You may come out trumps, of course... but equally you probably won't!

Anyway, if you're determined to go against what it states and do a Psychology EE in any case, I suggest you review your research and think what it is you want to talk about. Your title doesn't seem very clear to me -- what exactly are you talking about? Unique psychological problems of expat children, or their unique privileges? I'm not sure you can compare the two. You have to remember that these EEs are not just commentary and nor are they an opportunity for you to delve into something which really interests you. They have to be written to a pretty stringent academic standard.

What criteria would you use to explore the differences between them and evaluate them against each other? How would you justify those criteria? In my opinion, you can't do that. I mean short of giving every problem a score out of 10 for how bad it is (and then how would you justify picking that?) and every privilege a score out of 10 for how useful it is (and the same problem applies), there's no real way to do it which would meet with any academic standard. This is what I mean when I say you have to get the approach right, and why it's a good idea to do the subject so you'd be trained to realise that you can't approach it like that.

Also a final word of advice: don't use the Psychology syllabus, use the EE Guide. You don't have to link your EE to the syllabus at all.

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