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  • Posts

    • If you're more worried about uni acceptance than anything, maybe see if there are any mini-courses or exams you can take after you graduate just to get that pre-req.  E.g. In Australia, you can do TAFE for 3-6months and get the SL requirement that way.  Is there anything like that available for you?   Best of luck!
    • Commenting so someone else might want to say something.

      Studying is something to take one step at a time. To get 7s you first have to get at least 5s: one step at a time. Look for where your weaknesses are (in study techniques, concentration, time management, careless mistakes, nervousness during tests), and identify ways to improve. Look for things you could be doing, or doing better, and not just blame Japan or England. Whatever your experiences were, this may be a tough time for you, but you have to focus on ways you can control and follow through. Start by eliminating distractions and relieve sources of stress. One way is to reward yourself for productive study periods. A goal could be, next 30 minutes, I am going to finish this many math problems, and if successful, I am gonna reward myself by playing 2 quick games of chess (say 5-7 minutes of reward time). I like chess but obviously your reward would be something personal, such as eating a favourite snack. If goal was unsuccessful, take a quick break, skip the reward and modify the goal or duration so it's both manageable and productive. If you are stuck on one problem, the new goal might be spend 15 minutes reading notes and do some problems without looking at notes. As you first learn to manage time well, avoid scheduling precisely what to do for hours straight. Just have a goal of what to accomplish for the day and start making a goal only for the next 30 min. This allow you to reflect and update your goal for next 30 min. Another component is to break a big task into small task. For example you often have deadlines for English and history assignments. Set yourself dates to stick to for 1) reading materials 2) brainstorming 3) making an outline 4) write a draft 5) revise. It helps to calm yourself and make the assignment look far less daunting.  Specifically about revision, start by looking over past tests and SKIM over notes to recall your strengths and weaknesses. You don't need to read 10 pages of notes to remember you were confused or very clear about the topic. Then over each day just have an idea of what to study and follow through. Each day review a combination of topics you were good at and bad at, so you feel somewhat encouraged when you look at confusing topics. 
    • I will soon turn in my first EE (biology) draft, I feel really insecure about the quality of my essay, my topic, my research and research question, did anyone else feel that aswell before they turned it in and how did it go? Thanks
    • I'm willing to help, but please be more specific in your question. 
    • universities tend to prefer maths SL, but if it's a question of almost failing SL maths as opposed to doing well in maths studies, I'd say drop to studies. I'd double check uni requirements for the courses you're interested in as maths could be useful (especially in design) but if you don't think you'll be able to pull up your SL grades going to studies is probably your best option (but don't stress about it, plenty of people take studies and have no problems getting into university to do the courses they want  )
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