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  1. 2 points
    For the last few months I've been volunteering at my daughter's high school to help the 12th graders review for the International Baccalaureate (IB) Maths Standard Level Exam in May 2015. In the process I produced these review notes that I thought could be useful to other students preparing for the exam as well. Review Notes for IB Maths Standard Level I'd be grateful if you email me with any mistakes you find so I can correct them. Best of luck on the upcoming exams.
  2. 2 points
    Sup people of the IB. I found a short guide that I wrote a while ago that deals with stress and procrastination. I'll add more to it later (the irony but it is late ) so hopefully it's helpful. There's more to come if I remember Stress Firstly stress at school is mainly caused by lack of organisation. So sorting that out could half or even eliminate your 'i want to rip the hair out of my head' feeling! How to organise work: Invest in a folder if you write notes with a note book and use folder separators to make things easier.This makes losing notes a lot less likely because they are in a named folder. Plus it makes you feel really professional If you're feeling that things are getting to you, just step back for a little bit and think. You don't need to be getting overly stressed because that hinders your work and can result in tears, this isn't helpful to your development because it lowers your confidence. Try drinking some water, taking a short break from revision or going for a walk. Clear your mind. Procrastination This thing is horrible. I hate it loads and i have a half decent way of sorting it out. Just know that you cannot get rid of it completely otherwise you'll probably end up not enjoying life. No one can seize EVERY SINGLE opportunity they have to work. It's just not realistic haha The reason why procrastination happens is because there are two parts of your brain that helps this. ( I cannot remember their names, forgive me for that) One part see's the short term benefit of everything, like going on facebook or staring into the sky. This part is much bigger than the part that see's the long term benefit of working now. Plus the long term benfit part (the determined one) gets tired quickly. Ok, imagine yourself as two people. 'present' you, and 'future' you. 'Present' you wants to put off work and say i'll do it tomorrow until your you've started everything too late. This would make you think, 'yea i promise i'll do it tomorrow but now i'll watch tv' or 'now i'll stare at pictures of yoda riding a cat'. Do you notice this trend? It happens a lot. What you need to remember is that, it isn't now you that will be feeling the consequences of your procrastination, it'll be future you. (i hope this is making sense so far) You need to look to future you and think that you want to have less work so you'll do it now. Procrastination isn't because you're lazy, it's because you're weak in the sight of distractions (that sounds mean but everyone gets distracted for the reason i stated above) Keep your work neat.You don't want to be revising and realise that you cannot read half of anything that you've written. Some care will go a long way.You don't need to write full sentences when making notes, just something that can remind you what was taking place in class.Try organising your work daily.This further reduces the chances of losing sheets and notes, hole punch it and keep it safe. You'd be surprised how much they can help Lessen the distractions!Disable facebook or move the facebook app from the homepage of your phoneMute your computer so you aren't hearing all sorts of notificationsClear the cookies from your computer so you have to enter your password in everytime you want to log into something (but make sure you remember them haha) This makes logging into stuff an added effort so you're more inclined to just not bother and start your work.And if you need to just ban yourself from IBS and TSR (if you use it too)Give yourself motivation!Put pictures up of what you want to achievePlan a little treat you can have ONLY if you've completed a certain amount of work... not if you've done something for a specific timeIt's too easy to say 'i've read for half an hour, time to chill'. You could've just been sitting there [*]Look into what you want to do and what you need to do to get there My next point is that not all procrastination is bad! So when you feel lazy instead of refreshing the facebook homepage, read an article from the news or a page from a book relating to your subjects. Plus don't mistake procrastination for having a break, breaks are good! they keep your sanity in tact Ok the end is here! After multiple facebook references, unnecessary emoticons, incomplete sentences and poor humour that is. I really do hope someone finds this helpful as this took me a while to write but maybe it'll be worth it Just remember, a little stress isn't bad and taking breaks isn't the same as procrastination. I'll be adding more to this as things come to me. **** Here is a prioritized to do list: PrioritizedToDolist.pdf You list all your tasks and label them A - F, with A being the most important and anything after D generally something you can put off until you've finished everything before that. Stay concentrated and it won't seem like that much of a daunting task!
  3. 1 point
    The part of yours that felt wrong was the "...as the villain, however Victor..." part. I would focus on changing that. Maybe "In Mary Shelley's novel Frankenstein, while it is commonly assumed the monster is the villain, Victor Frankenstein's desire to conceal his creation exposes him as the true menace of the story." I still think this is stilted and needs work, though.
  4. 1 point
    The easier subject would be different for everyone. It depends on what your strength and weaknesses are. If you feel like they're both the same difficulty for you, check what the universties/programs you're aiming for want to see. If its ESS, then go with that. If Bio, go with that. Personally, I'd go with Bio since unis and programs recognize it more easily as its a rather standard course. I don't imagine many programs outside of IB doing something like ESS so they may have some trouble classifying the class for admissions. Biology SL is not too bad of a course- I did HL and it was fine.
  5. 1 point
    Yes Environmental Systems is considered to be of least rigor. As for the SL science you choose, I think it should be predicated on which branch of science you enjoy the most - because ultimately even if a subject is of higher rigor, you have more motivation to put effort into it. Obviously, if you don't enjoy the sciences at all, this doesn't really apply :)
  6. 1 point
    Hi, It's not easy to learn a language, especially if you don't have any classmates to learn from. You will have to do a lot of studying on your own. I recommend you watch movies and TV shows in French with English subtitles, that way you can get used to how words sound and what they mean. When you feel more comfortable, put on subtitles in French so that you see how words are written and pronounced (which can be very different in French). For reading, try to read articles in french (online news for kids in French will be very useful, as the vocab they use will be more appropriate to your level) as well as books (again, children's books or classic novels adapted for children will help you the most). For writing, keep a journal and try to write in French. Include new vocabulary and grammar you've learn't - simple sentences will do. If you write in your journal daily, you will get a lot of practice. Try to proofread your journal and check for mistakes, or have your teacher check it if you can (and then correct your mistakes so you learn from them). For speaking, it is harder because you don't have classmates. If there's someone taking French A or ab initio, try talking to them in French to practice. Otherwise, talk to your teacher in French only. Lastly, you could always speak out loud to yourself (it's weird, but good practice) or try to find a French pen pal online? All the things I suggested will take time and effort, and you won't see the results immediately. Just don't give up and try your best.
  7. 1 point
  8. 1 point
    Personal engagement is more about what you did that makes your IA different from another one of a similar topic. Unlike group 4 personal engagement, math p.e. worth more (4 out of 20) and you should think more carefully (it's not anything that one sentence would be enough). Basically going a page about how you are a nature enthusiast gets you about 1 out of 4 because it has nothing to do with the math. Generally, you could note down what you find curious about this sequence in relation of other math topics (for example how it compares and contrasts with arithmetic and geometric sequences). Basically anything original count as personal engagement. I am not sure how exactly you are approaching this but just make sure you talk about math at the SL level and not be too qualitative.
  9. 1 point
    Extended Essay for Dummies How to Start Your Extended Essay, How to Avoid Last Minute Panics, How to Effectively Get Help with your Extended Essay and More About to start your EE? Have you read the IBO Extended Essay Guide yet? If not, read it before continuing! Also please note - start a new thread if you want help with your EE! People do not regularly read this thread and you may not get a response. 1. So what exactly IS the Extended Essay? This is actually an extremely important post for many people to read, because many people fail to understand the significance of exactly what makes the Extended Essay unique, and go off in completely the wrong direction! It is not simply a very long version of a normal essay. The key point to understand is that the Extended Essay is specifically a research based essay. So this implies a few things. Firstly that your RQ (research question) should indeed be a question and not any kind of statement or prompt. Secondly that the essay must be investigating something -- it is NOT a narrative essay. If you try and write a narrative essay, you will find yourself with a very bad mark indeed. Unlike a normal essay the Extended Essay requires an element of research (look at external sources) and also a much more formal structure than any other type of essay you write in the IB. For instance it's probably the only thing you'll write for the IB which contains a Contents Page, and the only thing you'll write an Abstract for! It's actually excellent practice for writing proper essays at University. So, the Extended Essay is a 3,600-4,000 word research essay. Once you have understood this you've probably avoided the worst mistake you can make with the EE (bar one, which I'll come onto later) so congratulations! 2. How to ask people to help you with your EE on the IBS forums... Point number one - we are here to help you with your work, but not to do it for you. So think about your EE before you ask for help. Posts like "Help, my EE first draft is due in 2 days, I have no topic, please help me choose a topic" are likely to be ignored. AT LEAST have a subject and a vague/general area within that subject you're interested in. We will comment on all your ideas and make guiding comments, but we don't come up with the title for you. You are, after all, marked on your choice of essay title! To get a good response I suggest you do the following: A) Make your post title descriptive -- more "History EE - Stalin's rise to power" than "EE help needed!". Naming the subject area and the general area you're interested in in your title will help the people who have expertise in that subject find your post. B) Be specific! "Hi I am doing an EE in X, but I don't know where to start" is useless. If you're stuck on something SAY what it is you're stuck on! If you're not stuck on something then I suggest you put a bit more thought into it and spend an hour or two working out your ideas before asking for help. C) Make sure you've read the IBO Extended Essay Guide. Don't ask questions about format etc. until you have done because it tells you in there! Questions like, "what doesn't count as words" and "should i do an experiment" are 99% of the time answered in that guide. These are the kind of questions/issues we'd be more than happy to help with (not limited to just this though): We're very willing to help you if you can show us you've at least put some work into your EE. If you expect us to put in the work to help you, we need to know that you're putting in the work too. 3. How to find a topic and start writing your EE! 1. Choose a subject. Make sure it's a subject you enjoy. No point doing a literature EE when you hate the subject. Also at this point it's worth considering who is going to supervise your EE. If they are your favourite teacher it's great, but if they already have a reputation for being unhelpful/evil/not willing to put time into things, it's realistic to take into account the fact you probably want to avoid them. I know I avoided doing a science EE because my school's science department was so bad and went for humanities instead! If you're after top grades, it is easier to get them with good supervision and advice. 2. Choose a topic area in the subject you are interested in. Read the subject-specific guidelines published in the IB's Official EE Guide (free for all members to download in the Files section), these are invaluable and will help you confirm that your topic area fits well within the subject. If the topic almost identical to the example that is provided by the IB in the EE guide booklet, don't do it. Originality is something they really do look for. Even if you fall in love with a topic that's listed in the EE guide, avoid it. 3. Research the area. Read around. The internet is a nice place to start even though internet sources are not always the most reliable. If you are interested in Theory of Relativity (I'm not saying you should go out and do an EE on the Theory of Relativity, but for example), then go online, read about the topic - anything from wikipedia articles (though for the love of god, please don't use wikipedia as a source in your EE) to forum discussion, to fan sites etc. Don't rule out books either but I'm not saying you go and borrow 1000 books on the subject before you even have a topic. Just skim around. I think the term is 'look for inspiration' . You cannot just come up with a topic by sitting there and going, 'ZOMG, what should I do?????'. Instead of wondering what to do, actually go and do something! Talk to supervisor, look around, see what past IB students have done. Believe it or not, the EE will not be the last essay where you'll have to think of your own topic! Many university essays are also designed in a way where you are given a general area but have to focus the topic yourself! The EE is practice for this - not only practice in writing but also practice in research, analysing research, forming thesis - which is exactly what you do when you choose an EE topic. 4. You do not have to have a perfect title right away. Once you've identified an area you're interested in, you can start with a very broad question that can be narrowed down later. Go from something like: History >> European history >> Hitler >> The rise of Hitler >> Three most important factors leading to the rise of Hitler. Sometimes you may find that even the last topic is too broad and/or not appropriate for the EE, so you narrow it even further: To what extent was X more important than Y as a factor leading to Hitler's rise to power? Once you've got to about the 'Rise of Hitler' part, we can start to help you define and narrow your question. We probably can help you get from European history to Hitler but don't expect us to just take you from History to Hitler. (See part III for more details). 5. Once you've got your topic, think about a general theme or thesis you want to analyse or prove. Then start planning. Outline your main points and try to put them in some sort of logical order. 6. Then write. Don't worry about word count, don't worry about introduction, just write the 'meat' of the essay first. You can have different main points in separate documents and piece them together later. Most like you should end up with at least 1000 words over the limit and that's fine. Actually I'd rather you have more than less. Once you have all your main points, you can start piecing them together, refine your title/thesis, take out fluff and unnecessary things and polishing it. You may find, while doing this, you need to narrow your title down even further and that's perfectly fine, make the title suit the essay you've written if you need to. Of course, to do all this, you cannot write it 12 hours before the deadline, so plan your work accordingly!! (Contributed by Ruan Chun Xian, Vvi and biochem) 4. How do I avoid last minute panic?? All schools approach the EE differently, but here is how to avoid 'Oh **** my EE draft is due in 12 hours'. You may still opt to have a blind panic whilst doing your EE - this is for those who don't want to! Some tips... 1. Ideally, you should start brainstorming about your EE during your first year. Also your topic should be narrowed down and research question chosen before you finish IB1. If possible start gathering info during IB1 so that during the summer you only need to refine your research to suit your topic. Finish all research and start writing your first draft during the summer and pray that your EE adviser will take a look at it before school starts again (pick the best EE adviser you can, if they have no idea what they're doing it's not much comfort to the student and you're better off choosing a different subject, unfortunately). 2. Lay the groundwork for your essay in advance. I did all of this and my EE was practically done before IB2 started. I had already read the book I chose and gathered quotes along the way in IB1. I wrote mini essays analysing key characters that I used as my foundation for the essay which made writing my first draft incredibly easy. If you are doing a Group 4 (Science) EE, do the experiment before the summer so you can analyse and prepare the data over the holidays. 3. Do an outline. A proper one. 4. Ask tonnes of different people to read it and MAKE TIME for this to happen. Classmates too. The examiner it gets sent to might not know the topic at all, so it has to be explained in a way that is understandable by everyone. 5. Proof read it many times, and ask classmates/teachers/parents to do that too. Especially if English isn't your first language. I read a friend's EE that got a C , and his grammar was horrible. Maybe that contributed to his grade (at least indirectly), since the overall impression was shoddy. 6. Stick to the criteria. Make sure your essay is going in the right direction, and isn't on the line with another subject's criteria. This will result in either a bad grade or a lot of your precious time wasted re-writing it. (Contributions by Vvi and blindpet) Menu I. On How to Effectively Get Help on the Extended Essay on IBSurvival, Or Read this before making a thread! II. On How to Start Your Extended Essay III. On How to Avoid Last Minute Panic IV. How should the essay be presented? V. Where do I find examples? Subject-specific advice History Mathematics Group 4 Business First and golden rule: Do not leave it to the last minute!! I. On How to Effectively Get Help on the Extended Essay on IBSurvival, Or Read this before making a thread! For examples, see this thread. From Ruan Chun Xian: The EE forum is probably one of our busiest forum but I have a feeling many people may not find they get as much help as they would like when seeking help here. It's not that we don't want to help you, it's that often the ways you ask for help makes it extremely hard and/or off-putting for us to really help you. So here are some tips on how to effectively ask for help on your EE. Think about your EE before you ask for help: The threads that get ignored the most are those going along the lines of: 'Help, my EE first draft is due in 2 days, I have no topic, please help me choose a topic.' Erm...how exactly do you propose we choose a topic for you when we've never met you, never spoken to you before, don't know anything about you? I say this too many times but we are here to help you, but that does not mean we do work for you. We can help comment on your ideas, titles but we will not come up with titles for you. At least know what subject and general area of the subject you want to write about before asking for our opinions on it. If you absolutely have no idea, go and ask someone around you - teachers, friends, supervisor - first before coming to us because we can't conjure a topic out of thin air for you. Make your thread titles descriptive: Look, you would think this was obvious, but please don't just name your threads something like 'Biology EE' or "I need help' - there are so many, I can't stress this enough, threads with these kind of names and it's not motivating people to go in and find out what the thread is about. When there are about 3 threads called 'Biology EE', people would just go into one and miss the other. If you know your EE is about Stalin's rise to power, then for everyone's sake, put that in the title. I don't know why people can't grasp this concept that thread titles are supposed to say what the thread is about. When you're in the EE forum, a thread titled 'I need help on my EE' or even if you specify it as a Biology EE, it wouldn't say much. Do not type in CAPSLOCK: This is one of the forum rules but it appears people forget the moment they're panicking about the first draft that is due in 2 days. Seriously, typing the caps, bold and size 6 font is NOT going help you get an answer faster. In most cases, it annoys people and they don't answer you. From cereja: Don't ask about format unless you have already read the IBO guide and you don't understand something: Questions like, "what doesn't count as words" and "should i do an experiment" are 99% of the time answered in that guide. Be specific: "I don't know how to start" won't get you an answer. Ruan Chun Xian adds: Threads/posts that say things like "Help, I am writing an EE on topic X and I need help" or "My topic is X and I don't know what to do, help!" makes me want to just slap the person on the head and say, "What the **** do you need help WITH?" We are not mind readers. So SAY what you're having trouble with if you want help. The fact that you have a topic means you have something to work on, so if you don't know how to start, read around, do research, don't expect us to just tell you what to write! From Ruan Chun Xian: Ok all this sounds like we won't help you, but I'll tell you this. This is the kind of questions/issues we'd be more than happy to help with (not limited to just this though): My question is X: - Do you think it's narrow enough? - How can I make it more narrow? - Do you think it's appropriate for EE? My argument is X for topic Y: - Do you think it's reasonable? I'm having trouble with writing part X of topic/title Y, can you give some tips? [but give us some idea of what you've written in other parts] We're very willing to help you if you can show us you've at least put some work into your EE. If you expect us to put in the work to help you, we need to know that our help/time is going somewhere that is worth it. II. On How to Start Your Extended Essay From Vvi and biochem on choosing the topic: If the topic almost identical to the example that is provided by the IB in the EE guide booklet, don't do it. I was about to do my EE on the significance of balls (as in dances) in Jane Austen's literature, and then my EE supervisor told me that the same question was in the EE booklet. I was made to change it. If it's there, it's not original. Originality is something they really do look for. I fell in love with the topic they had in the Bio booklet for EE - something along the lines of analyzing the evolution of a symbiotic relationship of a fungi and bacteria. It sounds amazing, but I knew I had to do something else. From Ruan Chun Xian: 1. Choose a subject. Make sure it's a subject you enjoy. No point doing a literature EE when you hate the subject. 2. Choose a topic area in the subject you are interested in. Read the subject-specific guidelines published in the IB's Official EE Guide (free for all members to download in the Files section), these are invaluable and will help you confirm that your topic area fits well within the subject. 3. Research the area. Read around. The internet is a nice place to start even though internet sources are not always the most reliable. If you are interested in Theory of Relativity (I'm not saying you should go out and do an EE on the Theory of Relativity, but for example), then go online, read about the topic - anything from wikipedia articles (though for the love of god, please don't use wikipedia as a source in your EE) to forum discussion, to fan sites etc. Don't rule out books either but I'm not saying you go and borrow 1000 books on the subject before you even have a topic. Just skim around. I think the term is 'look for inspiration' . You cannot just come up with a topic by sitting there and going, 'ZOMG, what should I do?????'. Instead of wondering what to do, actually go and do something! Talk to supervisor, look around, see what past IB students have done. Believe it or not, the EE will not be the last essay where you'll have to think of your own topic! Many university essays are also designed in a way where you are given a general area but have to focus the topic yourself! The EE is practice for this - not only practice in writing but also practice in research, analysing research, forming thesis - which is exactly what you do when you choose an EE topic. 4. You do not have to have a perfect title right away. Once you've identified an area you're interested in, you can start with a very broad question that can be narrowed down later. Go from something like: History >> European history >> Hitler >> The rise of Hitler >> Three most important factors leading to the rise of Hitler. Sometimes you may find that even the last topic is too broad and/or not appropriate for the EE, so you narrow it even further: To what extent was X more important than Y as a factor leading to Hitler's rise to power? Once you've got to about the 'Rise of Hitler' part, we can start to help you define and narrow your question. We probably can help you get from European history to Hitler but don't expect us to just take you from History to Hitler. (See part III for more details). 5. Once you've got your topic, think about a general theme or thesis you want to analyse or prove. Then start planning. Outline your main points and try to put them in some sort of logical order. 6. Then write. Don't worry about word count, don't worry about introduction, just write the 'meat' of the essay first. You can have different main points in separate documents and piece them together later. Most like you should end up with at least 1000 words over the limit and that's fine. Actually I'd rather you have more than less. Once you have all your main points, you can start piecing them together, refine your title/thesis, take out fluff and unnecessary things and polishing it. You may find, while doing this, you need to narrow your title down even further and that's perfectly fine, make the title suit the essay you've written if you need to. Of course, to do all this, you cannot write it 12 hours before the deadline, so plan your work accordingly!! See Section III. III. On How to Avoid Last Minute Panic From blindpet: I don't know how most schools approach the EE but here is how to avoid 'Oh **** my EE draft is due in 12 hours'. You should start brainstorming about your EE during your first year. Also your topic should be narrowed down and research question chosen before you finish IB1. If possible start gathering info during IB1 so that during the summer you only need to refine your research to suit your topic. Finish all research and start writing your first draft during the summer and pray that your EE adviser will take a look at it before school starts again (pick the best EE adviser you can, if they have no idea what they're doing it's not much comfort to the student and you're better off choosing a different subject, unfortunately). I did all of this and my EE was practically done before IB2 started. I had already read the book I chose and gathered quotes along the way in IB1. I wrote mini essays analysing key characters that I used as my foundation for the essay which made writing my first draft incredibly easy. If you are doing a G4 EE, do the experiment before the summer so you can analyse and prepare the data over the holidays. I cannot stress how important proper planning is if you want to do well on your EE. Almost everyone in my class who struggled with it and were nowhere near done at the beginning of IB1 got C's or worse. From Vvi: -Do an outline. A proper one. -Ask tons of different people to read it. Classmates too. The examiner it gets sent to might not know the topic at all, so it has to be explained in a way that is understandable by everyone. -Proof read it many times, and ask classmates/teachers/parents to do that too. Especially if English isn;t your first language. I read a friend's EE that got a C , and his grammar was horrible. Maybe that contributed to his grade (at least indirectly), since the overall impression was shoddy. -Stick to the criteria. Make sure your essay is going in the right direction, and isn't on the line with another subject's criteria. IV. How should the essay be presented? This is a suggestion only. On the whole, your essay should look neat, professional, and easy to read. Sample_presentation_of_a_document.pdf V. Where do I find examples? It can be useful to look at Extended Essays other people have done to get a feel for the approach you should take and the depth of your analysis and thinking. If you are a VIP member or have purchased a paid subscription to IBSurvival you can use the Files system and download EEs uploaded by members. You can also find examples for some subjects by Googling "50 Excellent Extended Essays" and finding the IB's official exemplar essays posted online. These are EEs the IB considers top quality, so are an excellent way of judging the standard your own EE should attain. If you have good tips on anything about the EE, please feel free to post them and we will add them to the main post. Please keep this thread constructive, so if you have nothing better to say than just 'This is awesome!' then don't post at all.
  10. 1 point
    Tag urself, I'm "crying for no reason".
  11. 1 point
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  13. 1 point
    Hey guys lately i've been addicted to K-POP I would like,,,if you could share a few things in this forum, for example your favorite K-POP group which member/s do you like the most and why the song/s you like the most and also the music video and so on, feel free to add to the list personally i like KARD and i like rumor and don't recall the most when it comes to this K-POP group (this group really stands out cuz this group consists of 2 guys and 2 girls) and i like BM and J-seph for their voice BTS- i like their MVs cuz there dance is great and i like Jimin the most cuz he is cute. Blacpink- fire is my most favorite song and their MVs are great EXO- i'm really crazy abt this boy band anyways thanks guys
  14. 1 point
    This thread could be used for the new syllabus IA from 2016 onwards. Please note that I cannot help individual students with their IA. The choice of topic should be your own work so please do not ask for suggestions for your IA. The following information is taken from the May 2015 subject report (I'm sure it is copyrighted to the IB, but I see no harm in sharing it with IB students). Research question: Encourage students to choose a research question that has a degree of challenge, is of interest to them and one where they do not know at the outset what the outcome will be.A good research question will probably try to determine a trend or relationship. Students should avoid simple comparative analysis of supermarket brands or other systems with a non-chemistry relevant independent variable.General information: Students should include some background theory to set the context of their investigation.With a ten hour time allocation to facilitate meaningful enquiry it is expected that students will collect significantly more data than is currently the case in Design assessments.It is sensible for students to always be encouraged to make a statement related to the safety, environmental or ethical impact of their study.Encourage students to reflect on data while carrying out the research so that they can actively make the decision to modify the procedure or collect more data if needed. This is a good indicator of true engagement and candidates can record such decisions being made.Length of report: Although there is a requirement for more data and more reported detail there is a 12 page length limit. This means that students have to be intelligently concise and the current trend for hugely repetitious use of cut and paste for calculations or procedural details and the inclusion of pages of data-logged data should be avoided.Uncertainties: When analysing their data students should show appreciation of the impact of measurement uncertainties. This could be evidenced through the propagation of error using a sensible protocol through a calculation, the drawing of a graph with appropriate best fit line and quite possibly the inclusion of error bars and always the appropriate use of significant figures. Since the Individual Investigations will take many different forms the teacher will have to decide what constitutes the appropriate treatment of uncertainties applicable to that research.If the research includes the analysis of secondary data students should still show consideration the associated uncertainty.Writing the report: The Communication criterion will introduce new requirements. The students’ designed procedures should be reported in past tense and include sufficient detail for the reader to be able to reproduce the experiment in principle.Do not encourage the students to write up reports using the criterion titles as report sections. In particular Personal Engagement is a criterion to be assessed across the whole report and is not an introductory section.There will be an increased focus on the proper referencing of sources used for background theory, procedural instructions or literature vales. This is a hugely important consideration that has to be stressed clearly to the students.Conclusion/ Evaluation: When concluding, students should draw a conclusion and discuss its methodological validity but should also compare it to expect outcomes (if any) based on accepted theory.If the outcome is quantitative then the comparison to a literature value, calculation of percentage error and discussion of the impact of systematic and random errors is still the expectation.In addition to possible modifications students should also reflect on possible extensions to their research.
  15. 1 point
    I did both igcse maths and add maths and am currently doing maths HL in IB. Despite having done both courses there was a jump I needed to adapt to - you'll feel a greater one without additional maths. That does not mean you're not legible for it. As @kw0573 already mentioned, it's up to your abilities and motivation. There's a girl in my class who didn't do igcses and the level of maths she did in her old school was more or less comparable to igcse, and she's doing fine. I also agree with the part where you need to take your time to do exercises on a weekly if not daily basis. I find myself doing exercises instead of actual homework in order to maintain my level of understanding in the class. Of course I end up doing both, but if I know I'm not struggling in let's say chemistry I'll do the homework after I practise maths. Try learning some of the content! I learned parts of the syllabus myself as I did the 2 year course for add maths in 7 months with the teacher, so I had less time with him and more time spent on my own studying the content. I hiiiiighllyyyy recommend the Haese Mathematics book for additional maths. You can only get it through their website and takes a while to ship but oh my is it a good book! Good luck!
  16. 1 point
    Hello! The IB isn't for everyone and you're not a failure for dropping out; it's normal. However just take a deeper look at yourself before you make your decision. If you really lack the motivation to continue in your studies, then I'd drop it for sure. Honestly if you're going to be working in your own country and just doing social work after you graduate, IB doesn't really help your job prospects too much. It made no difference in making my life easier post-secondary. So just do what you like! A bunch of people drop out of the program and it's completely normal- it doesn't make them stupid, they just figured out there were better options Cheers!
  17. 1 point
    i learnt to train my tears to fall onto my keyboard to write an essay
  18. 1 point
    Maybe this video will help: https://youtu.be/MuYUcA_VG7w
  19. 1 point
    Hey guys! so while i was going through the threads, i saw that none of them actually gave good pointers on how to write a very good abstract. So i've got a few notes which i'll share with everyone. They were handouts which my supervisor had given me, but i just condensed it into one. Good luck! HOW TO WRITE AN ABSTRACT An abstract is a concise, stand-alone statement that conveys the essential information contained in an article, book, research paper, or document. Written in a direct non-repetitive style, the abstract should: - Identify the problem (research question of thesis) investigated. - Describe the scope or method of investigation. - Summarize the results. - State the conclusion(s). The abstract for an EE can only be 300 words (max) long. It is usually done right at the end of the process, but it comes in after your cover page in the presentation. Writing the abstract 1. Highlight the sentences in the paper that detail the problem (objective) investigated. 2. Highlight the research question (or thesis). 3. Identify information (phrases, key words) that shows the scope and sequence of the investigation-identify but do not explain. 4. condense the conclusion into a few concise sentences. Words of advice: 1) for the first draft, don't worry about length. Just try to cover all the important components that are required in the abstract. Use all the information that highlighted and identifiedas you read through the essay (or article). 2) Take a word count before you begin to edit. 3) Begin editing by deleting words, phrases and sentences that are less important or provide more explanation than necessary. 4) Look for places where sentences can be combined to omit extra words or condense idea. 5) Delete unnecessary background information. 6) Do not use jargon, abbreviations, direct quotes or citations. 7) Avoid writing in the first person (I). Rather than saying. "In this essay I discuss...",try a more formal approach by starting your abstract with an opening simlar to: This essay discusses the effects of...Specifically, this paper investigates (restate research question)..." "This essay examines how...It attempts to answer the question..." 8) Write the required word count. If a 300 word abstract is required (this IS required for IB), get as close to the require number of words as possible. At this stage, as well planning your arguement, you need to think about the marking criteria and requirements for the presentation. THE ASSESSMENT CRITERIA FOR AN EXTENDED ESSAY Criteria (Marks Available) A- Research Question (2) B- Introduction (2) C- Investigation (4) D- Knowledge and Understanding (4) E- Reasoned argument (4) F- Application of analytical and evaluative skills (4) G- Use of language appropriate to the subject (4) H- Conclusion (2) I- Formal Presentation (4) J- Abstract (2) K- Holistic judgment (4)
  20. 1 point
    It has been a while since I did my economics exam but I hope I can give you some good advise. Generally for paper one the questions are essay type and consist of two parts a and b. Part a of the question usually asks you to demonstrate your knowledge of some concept and its applications. You need to identify what concepts the question addresses and then take it on from there. I will try to illustrate what I mean with an example question from the SL paper 1 2013 specimen paper: "Suggest reasons why the price elasticity of demand for cigarettes might have a different value from the price elasticity of demand for foreign holidays." Here you can identify the concept as being Price elasticity of demand. So your response should include the definition of PED. Now you need to see what things related to PED is the question asking you about. Here you have two different goods with different PEDs so the question is particularly interested in the range of values that the PED can take and also the factors that influence it. So in your analysis you need to explain that PED can have a range of values from 0 to infinity. Explain what the likely range is for each of the two goods mentioned above and what it means: Cigarettes have price-inelastic demand (PED < 1) (which means that the quantity demanded is not very responsive to price- changes in price lead to proportionately smaller changes in quantity demanded) while foreign holidays are likely to have price-elastic demand (PED > 1). Now you need to suggest reasons for their different PED values which means you need to mention the factors that influence PED and explain how each of these affects the PED value for the two goods. These factors can include the "necessity of the goods", "proportion of income spent", "availability of substitutes", about three should be enough given the time limitation that you have. So overall, to structure your response, you can start with a definition of PED and explain that it has different values. Then give the example of the two goods mentioned in the question, say what their PED values. Then you can mention the reasons they have different PED by referring to the factors influencing PED and explain how it affects each PED of each good. So in general for part a) you need to identify the concepts and the areas related to it. See what terms you might need to define and what areas related to that concept you need to explain. Then apply the concept in the context of the question (in the above question you had to apply your knowledge of factors influencing PED to explain why to goods have different PED values). Also include one or two diagrams whenever possible (in the above case you could draw the possible demand curve for each good when you explain what their PED values are). Part b) is more evaluative in nature in the sense that you need to apply your knowledge of economic concepts that you used in part a) to evaluate some outcomes of a decision/policy or to discuss the pros and cons of some economic concept. Let me again illustrate this with an example. Question: "Examine the usefulness of a knowledge of price elasticity of demand to firms and governments". Here you need to mention the use of PED for two different entities: firms and governments. Firms use PED for determining how to increase total revenue while governments need it to make tax decisions. So a possible approach is to start with applications to determining how total revenue changes with price for different PED values. As for governments you can discuss applications to deciding whether to tax a good or not. You need to explain how taxing goods with different PED values affects the quantity consumed and also the tax revenue earned. As this part is based on evaluation you need to include some evaluation of possible implications of taxing a good with high PED (low tax revenue and possible loss of employment as output is reduced). So in general for part b) the command term ("discuss", "evaluate", "explain") should guide you as to what is expected. For example if you are asked to "evaluate" you need to discuss the pros and cons of that particular concept and what the possible results can be. If it is to "discuss" you need to give both sides of the matter and see what the is good/bad about each. In the example I gave, you were asked to "examine" so you had to structure your response around explaining how the knowledge of PED can be used to guide government decision to tax and firm decision to increase/decrease prices. My final advice is to identify the key points and concepts in the questions and make a rough plan of what you need to cover in your response (It is quite similar to how you would write your essay in a literature paper) then start writing out the essay. Make sure to include definitions of terminology that you use and include diagrams to illustrate the point where needed. Make sure to plan your time well since you don't run out of time on the last questions. I hope you find my explanation useful and good luck on the exam!
  21. 1 point
    Here's my best advice: don't limit yourself. When I started working on my EE, I knew I wanted to research something pertaining to sex because I found it really interesting. But I realized that sex is a very broad topic with a lot of different subjects beneath it. So I wrote at the top of a piece of paper "SEX" (which looked really weird to people who saw it lol) and wrote down everything I could think of that related to it. I ended up choosing sexuality from that list and then asexuality from a similar process. This is where you are. You know what you want, right? Now start asking yourself questions about it; what do you want to know. You'll realize soon enough that your actual research question will come from the preliminary research you do. If you have to turn something in to a teacher, then do so however know that it can and will change. As it happens, gender roles are a HUGE part of my essay. So my suggestion to you is not to focus on them as the main part of your question, instead pick something else and use gender roles as your argument towards or against whatever you pick. For example, my RQ is as follows: To what extent do established gender roles contribute to the rejection of asexuality as a sexual orientation? There's so much research on gender, it's crazy. That's why it works better as support, not the topic. I hope this helps! If you have any questions, feel free to message me.
  22. 1 point
    You could do what I did: Memorise the names of six historians - two American, two British, one Russian, one NAM (I chose an Indian). Then slap their names in your essays when: (1) Making vague statements, eg. "The U2 incident was an embarrassment to the US and the Cold War heated up as a result of it" will become "Keylor posited that the U2 incident caused relations to heat up between the US and USSR." This is something very obvious and any Cold War historian would have said this in one form or another. Ta-da! Historiography. (2) When presenting arguments for two sides of a topic, eg. "The US believed that the spread of Soviet communist influence would be to the detriment of the world community, and the Soviets believed that the US was threatened by the presence of a competing superpower when the Marshal Plan was doled out" will become "Jackson (an American historian) brought forth the American perspective in that the bedrock of capitalism was rendered obsolete by communist philosophy, making the Cold War an all the more necessary fight; Golenischev (a Russian historian) counterargued that the Cold War was borne of American fear of rising Soviet influence in a world ripe for US hegemony." Ta-da! Historiography. In a single essay, aim to name-drop along these lines maybe 3-6 times. This ^ method worked for me in getting a 7. So yeah.
  23. 1 point
    I have a social life, good grades and get enough sleep. YOU MAD? The IB is not much worse than school in general.
  24. 1 point
    All the advice Sandwich has given you is of course correct, I would just like to add on that you need a different format altogether to write a successful comparative essay, especially if it is your EE. For example: The use of dialogue in TtLG when analysed makes Alice more powerful, but the same in THoS is an indicator of Clara's weaknesses. However, when we consider the relative importance the authors place on age, Alice's inability to be powerful is sharply contrasted by Clara's glowing equality with men... and it goes on in that manner where some attributes contrast them and others bind them together. But the most celebrated format is always Attribute/Literary device X in Book 1 does A whereas in Book 2 it does B, Y in Book 1 does C and it book 2 it also does C, but Z in book 1 does D and in book 2 does E. Contrast - Similarity - Contrast - Similarity and on. And again always jumping between books 1 and 2, back and forth on every point to really flesh out your argument.
  25. 1 point
    Im hopefully going to study in Spain... I just want to know EXACTLY the recognition and what do I have to do switch my IB points into sleectividad (the spanish system).. Also any idea about scholarships in or outside Spain!?
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