terribletouw

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terribletouw last won the day on October 25 2016

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About terribletouw

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    Female
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    Nov 2016
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    Australia

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  1. Probably, and I would recommend that you do - you need to make sure you analyse the techniques used by Orwell to convey his message instead of just finding links to today. Although the relevance of the text to Trump is definitely interesting, it's not really relevant for an analysis of Orwell in any form other than a brief sentence in the introduction/conclusion highlighting the relevance of issues/themes/ideas raised by Orwell throughout history and even now.
  2. Honestly, you can get into law with any subjects - they usually aren't too picky as long as you do well I did mine in English A, so you could do Russian? Choosing a book/set of poems/play or two to analyse makes it relatively easy to focus your research/analysis. Also, they seem to mark them nicely compared to the History EEs. Picking a subject you're interested in also helps a lot (especially for motivation) - so you could look into doing it in Geography or Economics? Good luck!
  3. Keep geography unless you really hate it - you can get into law with basically any subject combination for the most part. If you are really concerned about it, double check the requirements pages for law courses you are interested to make sure it's not a requirement.
  4. Hey just one more thing to add with ANU, they have a "guaranteed entry" scheme based on your predicted marks. So for example if you wanted to get into law and you were predicted a 40 and given an offer, but afterwards you get like 38 or 39 (or anything above 24-25) in the actual exams, you still get in It may not work for you because of your different school year, but it would be worth emailing them to ask. Also, don't stress if you are a mark or two off the requirements unis ask for - they may have extra places so you can still get in regardless. The only uni that currently has an additional test for law, that I know of, is UNSW. You won't have to worry about it for ANU or USYD. Something to keep in mind is that taking the LAT for UNSW could actually be an advantage if you do well on it, and just miss the ATAR cutoff, since they take both factors into account rather than just your score. I'm doing Commerce/Law, so feel free to message me if you have questions about either. Good luck for your exams!
  5. Check the Language B syllabus, it has all the guidelines
  6. Ooh yeah also with quizlet if you search "IB French" and a topic, there are lots of lists that people have already made which are useful
  7. Try tex's french grammar - it shouldn't be that hard to self-teach. Make sure to look at the conditional, si clauses, the futur simple, imperfect, and the subjunctive. Learn some conjunction and linking words as well. Make sure you do past papers too, and learn vocab related to the options you are studying. i.e. we did health and leisure. Good luck! I'm sure you'll be fine, especially if your mom is french
  8. We never used a book designed for IB, so i can't help you there. Do past papers, that's the best practice, and get your teacher to mark them. You could even do some ab initio ones first and then try SL ones. I'd recommend getting a grammar book if anything - I used Schaum's French Grammar. Also read articles on the internet related to the topics you are studying and look up words you aren't sure of.
  9. The most useful thing will be to do as many past papers as you can. Paper 1s are good because it's just comprehension so it's not difficult to sit down and do a bunch - so do those when you're sick of IB and not bothered to do something that requires effort. It's a good way to pick up vocab as well. Personally I'd focus on Paper 2 more, since I tended to neglect practicing for that because it required a lot more effort. Try writing a response without a dictionary then afterwards look up some vocab related to the question. If you then work on memorising that vocab you will be better prepared for whatever question you get in the exams. Also, get your teacher to mark your work - you'll be able to see what grammar points you need to fix. Make sure you learn what they want in each text type since that's a super easy way to get 5 marks - read through past mark schemes and look for resources on the internet, there's a document somewhere with everything you need. Learn a couple of subjunctives - especially conjunctions - and how to conjugate the basic ones - i.e. être, avoir, vouloir, aller - as that will get you marks for using sophisticated grammar. Also si clauses, the conditional tense and the fancy future tense are good to know. Learn the format they want for the individual oral - like how to say in the foreground, background, etc. and practice on photos beforehand. Then if you get nervous in the real thing it's less of an issue if you've got a series of things you know you should mention. The written assignment is a gift, honestly, since you can do it from home (unless they've changed that) - choose an easy text type and double check every word.
  10. We did short stories which I would recommend - it's a lot less to get through. We did Les Muets (by Albert Camus) and then some others
  11. I think it was the IB yeah. In any case, all the ones I read were good, a few had the examiner's comments as well?
  12. So what do you actually want help with?
  13. What I did for my written assignment was write a letter from the perspective of another character - you could do that? For example, you could do Gatsby, Nick, Daisy, Tom, etc.'s perspective. Or a minor character like Wilson. Personally I would do a diary entry from Daisy's perspective - she's got a lot of emotional conflict to deal with
  14. You'll lose marks in the Communication area of the criteria, I imagine it's 1-2 marks? But really, that's ridiculously long, you should be working on cutting that down.
  15. Honestly I don't understand why you would need those unless you've gone through all the IB past papers for your subjects - there are tonnes for Maths, English, Chinese, etc.