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Abbidotabbi

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    13
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  • Gender
    Female
  • Exams
    May 2013
  • Country
    United States
  1. I read that for the math HL exams, they provide you with a information booklet of all the formulas. I found what I assume to be that information booklet (it says "Mathematics HL, Further Mathematics SL Information Booklet"), but it has so many formulas in it it seems too good to be true. Does IB really provide you with all of those formulas for the exams?
  2. Does anyone know how much we should write to answer each essay question for papers 2 and 3? How much does it normally take to answer each question? Oops my tag should say papers 2 and 3, not 1 and 2
  3. I am taking the English HL paper 1 tomorrow, and the main thing I'm worried about is structure, particularly with the opening and closing paragraphs. What exactly should be included in the introduction, and how should it be formatted? Should it just be stating the author's name, the title of the poem/ prose work, an outline of our main points, and then a thesis statement? How should the thesis statement be formatted/what should it include? Also, and maybe this is a stupid question, but do we need a title for our analysis? As far as the conclusion goes, should it just be restating our main points and then ending with a clincher? Should it include more personal beliefs/reads as far as the poem/prose goes? That's a lot of questions, but if anyone has any advice at all on writing the paper, I would really appreciate it!
  4. I'm studying for the upcoming HL history exams, and I am wondering how detailed of information the examiners are looking for. I read somewhere that for each essay (especially for Papers 2 and 3) include only 3 main facts or points, and then mostly just analyze those and bring in historiography. I know that main dates are important, but how important is it to memorize specific days and months (for example, that President Kennedy was assassinated on Noevember 22, 1963)? Also, what about statistics, such as how many soldiers or how much equipment and money were involved in different wars (Example: there were 8,000 US advisors in Vietnam by 1961)? I know they are looking for an overall understanding of the issues, but I'm just not sure how broad or narrow that overall understanding needs to be, if that makes sense. Any advice would be appreciated!
  5. Does anyone know which set of percentages is required for the exams? 68%, 95%, 99.7% OR 68.26%, 95.44%, 99.74% Because I have seen it both ways...
  6. I'm starting to create my TPPP (I'm in SL theatre) and one of the first problems I'm hitting is how to organize it. I've read the rubric (though I don't quite understand it...) and other information on it, but I'm a little confused as to what all to put in. From what I've read, I need to talk about: (1) 1-2 productions I've been involved in (2) A few of the areas/topics we've covered in class (3) How I've grown from the class (and productions?) (4) The three different areas of theatre (5) Theatre in other cultures What I don't understand is how all of those fit together-- it seems like if I talked about each of those, my presentation would sound like a hodge-podge of random topics. Is one more important than the others-- should one be the overall theme and focus? Or I do I just start talking about my role in a production, then move on to what we've done in class, and then talk about each in the light of the three areas of theatre? Any advice would be much appreciated!
  7. Does anyone know when all of the 2013 theatre assessments are due to IB? I heard April 15 but I'm not sure
  8. I'm in theatre SL and I'm wondering if the PPP has to be a musical, or if music has to be included. If anyone knows for sure, please let me know!
  9. Thanks! That's exactly what I needed to know!
  10. If you're wanting to do how it has changed or evolved over time, that would be history, although it's best to choose topics in history that are around 10 years old or so, just because there's more information on them. It might help to focus on hip-hop, say, in the 80's or 90 's (I don't know that much about it). You could also move into sociology and talk about how hip-hop affects different societies today- you would just have to be careful not to make it too history based, then. Of course, you could also actually focus on hip-hop as dance and look at it from the arts perspective. Good luck!
  11. I'm in theatre arts SL and we haven't really done much with our workbooks. Do we actually send those in, or are they more of a suggestion or aid for ideas? I guess what I'm asking is should I be freaking out and trying to fill my workbook up in the next couple weeks?
  12. What exactly counts in the word count for the History IA? I know the title page, list of sources, and table of contents don't, and I read that the section titles don't either, but what about the in-text citations? For example: These same officials were profiting economically from the “buying power of social groups” (Barth, 2003, p. 25) Would (Barth, 2003, p. 25) count in the word count? Please only tell me if you know for sure, as this will significantly affect my paper. Thanks!
  13. I would like my TOK presentation to deal with the real life situation of recieving vaccinations and the issue that not getting them poses to herd immunity. I was thinking that my knowledge issue would be something like "To what extent do individuals have the right to their own bodies" (something along those lines) and/or "to what extent do parents have the right to make decisions dealing with the bodies of their children". The wording might need to be reworked, but does it fit the criteria of a knowledge issue? Also, I'm a little confused as to how to approach the discussion of the knowledge issue. I read the feed on the TOK presentation, and I understand that the beginning of the presentation should establish the real life situation, and following should be a discussion of the knowledge issue(s). I also understand that the knowledge issue should be analyzed in terms of the four ways of knowing. What I'm confused about is whether the discussion of the knowledge issue should be in terms of the real life situation. For example, if my real life situation was vaccines and my KI the individual's right to their body, when I proceed to talk to about the KI should I say something like, "Approaching the situation using emotion, I would very strongly feel that I have a right to my own body, and therefore should be able to decide whether or not to be vaccinated. However, if I employed reason, I would understand that by not being vaccinated, and by others like me not being vaccinated, we could compromise the health of the community." On the other hand, should I just totally leave out my real-life situation in the discussion of the KI and bring it back in at the end? Or should leave out my real-life situation in the discussion of the KI, but bring in maybe other illustrations to illustrate the points I'm making? It just seems rather difficult to talk about the KI with absolutely no reference to real-life situations. Any advice would be appreciated!
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