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Vasudha

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    Female
  • Exams
    May 2015
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    India

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  1. In architecture, universities look at a strong base in both math and physics. You need art, true. But if you want to create hardy structures, which presumably are not to collapse, the first ywo are of a greater importance (as emphasized by Ayn Rand in the Fountainhead). If you're bored with biology, why not try Physics? In case of maths, I would suggest at least SL (because calculus is of greater need than statistics in architecture). Again, please make sure that this doesn't bar you from your aspiration uni requirements. About language? Well being proficient in both Japanese and French, I feel that japanese is easier in terms of pronunciation and overall grammar structure and rules. If you can deal with learning a new script, it'll be easy enough. But French hs utility in a greater number of countries. So you should choose accordingly, in the ab initio level (if you have no prior experience in the language). Hope this helped!
  2. Hey Abdullah. Everyone is talented in there own way! Sure Math SL and HL are difficult and challenging. But Studies doesn't inherently makes anyone 'stupid'. Many of my friends who have taken Studies are the smartest people I have known, doing great in the most challenging aspects of IB. At my school, teachers, in fact, encourage students to consider Studies if they absolutely don't require it in their career aspirations (given that they find SL level hard to cope up with). At the end of the day, its your scores that matter. Getting a 4 in SL versus 7 in Studies... of course the latter gives you a greater leverage. Plus you can focus on your other HLs. Most universities do cover any mathematical basics in the beginning of their courses. I suggest check up your uni requirements for Medicals. Unless explicity stated, you can go ahead with Studies.
  3. Well its a great idea. I suggest yo check up that you have enough material on hand first. If you do your EE on aerodynamics, make sure that you focus more on the physics part. Whatever subject you choose, you need to keep in mind that your EE can't be interdisciplinary. (And this gets tricky when doing an EE in Science).
  4. 1. If you prefer external note taking, to MS Word or other virtual ones, I suggest you use a BINDER (per subject). This is a great way as you can keep the ever-increasing notes in one place (and not have to deal with a mltitude of notebooks). 2. For resources, make separate folders for each subject (on your laptop). Clear Bags can become unusually handy. 3. When studying through sections and sample paper, use a highlighter to mark important portions, or ones that you found confusing, or dfficult to understand. 4. Keep a planner. With the amount of assignments and activities you are about to handle, knowing what to prioritize when is an essential skill required in IB. Hope this helps!
  5. I see. Thanks @Maks123456. I'll keeps that in mind.
  6. Pretty true I guess. And well Russia has always been pretty adamant about having 'influence' in the Black Sea. But the funny little fact is that President Putin denies any illegality associated with the "pro-Russian militants" taking over Crimea. (Hear him tell Merkel that we aren't breaking any international law.) I wonder what the Nobel Prize Association has to say about that. (Ouch.)
  7. You won't know unless you try. So atleast apply. Some of my friends have gotten into Oxbridge with similar grades. And 41 is actually pretty good. Oxbridge mainly looks at your +2 grades, so you don't have to worry about your GCSEs. But before applying check individual course requirements for both Oxford and Cambridge. If you meet the basic requirement criteria, there is no harm in trying. Make yoru Personal Statement strong so you'll have a well-rounded application. If you get selected it all depends o your interview and written exam (+TSAs). Best of Luck!
  8. Well, one thing I'm constantly told by my teacher in history is that for Paper 1 and Paper 2, scoring a historiography in your essay is the difference between a 6 and a 7. Now while I get bucket loads of facts about a certain topic or event, it gets really difficult to get historians' view on the topic. Can someone tell me exactly how do you get your historiography?
  9. Khan Academy has great material to practice from in all subjects. Try A-Level books for some help. Since I'm from India, I can suggest some great books that my friends use here, but I'm not sure if it will be available to you easily. Nevertheless, out national curriculum books are more complicated so we use those question banks, and the competitive exam question banks. More sites: Rutgers Physics, Georgia Public Broadcasting, The Physics Classroom, HyperPhysics. Hope this helps.
  10. You have IB Summer Schools at Universities. Then you could go for US University Summer Programs in well-recognized colleges like Stradford, Harvard and Cornell. But these are definitely pretty expensive. And they don't really offer scholarship or financial aid. You also have the TASP Summer programs which are pretty interesting and come with financial aid. But you need to be selected. If you can get nominated for the GYLC, then that is another great platform. If you are a fan of international relations, try MUNning. Enroll yourself in any local NGO or social service group. You ge to meet interesting people and gather first hand experience. If you want internships, you should apply to places which have direct bearing on the course you will opt for in universities. So if you are a business student, get into some Customer Service department for a work experience. Keep trying, and search in general instead of going to speciic sites. You'll find a lot of interesting and feasible stuff. Oh and if you want some immersion programs that don't cost much, check out UWC sites (I know of MUWCI programs). Also contact the Rotary International if you have a branch nearby.
  11. From what I know, both levels in physocs HL or SL have more or less the same core topic with Hl having extra content. As a general rule HL students re expected to have a deeper knowledge and understanding of the subject, hence the difficulty is higher than the SL counterpart. Also in any science HL subject you have to do more PSOWs (Practical Scheme of Work which you'll get to know about eventually. They are a part of your internal assessment.) So you'd have to put in greater effort. I know that SL Chemistry students don't have most of the high-level concept content in their syllabus. Whatever is there is fairly simple to understand. Although the papers in both sciences and both levels are application-based.
  12. Try a Manifesto, or perhaps something creative like a story or a poem (it's extremely experimental though. So choose only if you're confident enough.) Eulogy will be a great idea. But it all depends on what your source and your main theme is. And what do you want to say. For eg, if I were to discuss the issue of language crisis, a poetry would be a great way to reach many people, or a short story. A blog might be a nice idea too. But if I were to do something with language and media, a newspaper article would be a great option. If you could tell me what topic you are basing your WT on, I'd be able to help better.
  13. While it is geared towards World Schools style, there are certain rebuttal tips and speech making tips you gave great for the GSL. And sure it is useful. Hope you do enjoy MUN more.
  14. @Wicquor, thanks for your feedback. I guess I could make it a bit more realistic. I love that concept. I kind of know this person, in an almost similar position as Gene Hwang, so it feels quite easy-to-relate. And here is another write up. OF WARS AND BROKEN DREAMS Thinking of things impromptu, The boy sat gazing out, Of the shattered window, At the ruined concrete below. His grimy cheeks stained with tears, As he dived into bitter remembrance His worried mind weighed a ton With sounds of cannons and sight of blood. He walked through the ravaged city, Surrounded by charred corpses. His worried eyes are like unfathomable voids, Yet filled with tempestuous emotions. A burning wrath bubbled in his heart's depths; He lashed out on a wrecked wall. Chaotic dreams stabbed his being And he let lose an agonized scream. Haunted by happy faces and dying screams, He falls to his knees - abruptly, His eyes droop with his body drained, A numbness takes over as he sleeps. (Vasudha Kataruka)
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