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oakendurin

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oakendurin last won the day on April 26 2016

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    May 2016
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    Finland

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  1. Since the questions in Paper 1 are basically always the same, look at mark schemes of past papers to see what the IB expects from each type of question. For the first question: Write at least three points in part a because the question gives three points. Don't straight up copy from the source of course, but list the same points as the source but just using different words. So be as precise as possible without copying the text. And in part b, have at least two points that the source conveys. The second question gives six points, so maybe you could attempt to find three similarities and three differences from the two sources that you need to compare and contrast. Or at least six in total, if you can't think of an equal ratio of similarities and differences. The third question: You just need to make sure you mention the origin, purpose, value, and limitations of both sources. You don't need to compare the two sources, you can just treat them separately. So, you could say that 'a source was written in 1936 (origin) to present a new viewpoint in the analysis of the impact of the Locarno Treaty (purpose) which makes it valuable for historians since it can look at the events of the 1925 treaty in retrospect and it also differs from the usual opinions of the time, providing a new perspective (value). It is limited because the author was not present at the treaty and thus might not know all the facts (limitations).' Or something along those lines. Just look at the origin and purpose and think of the values and limitations that come from them. Fourth: Try to use all the sources in the paper for this mini essay. So construct an answer to the question using the points that the sources make and then also use your own knowledge of the topic to provide more arguments or background information and such. You could also use the sources as evidence for your own arguments. This is the only question where you actually need to know anything about the topic, so the other three questions you can score well on by just knowing the technique of answering them and what the IB expects. Something that's also important is the time allocation. Dividing your time something like this is advisable according to my history teacher: 1: 5-10 minutes 2: 10-15 minutes 3: 10-15 minutes 4: 20-30 minutes I don't remember the exact amounts he said, but the main point is that you should spend the least amount of time on question 1, about the same on 2 and 3, and almost half of the hour should be spent on the last question. But this of course depends on you and your strengths, so try to find what works best for you. I hope this helps!
  2. I don't see why you couldn't use bullet points to structure your answer in the first two questions, as long as you use full sentences. My teacher hasn't said anything about using bullet points so I don't know for sure if it's advisable or not. I think he would have mentioned if it was absolutely not allowed to use bullet points though But I know it's not required to use bullet points so if you feel uncertain about using them, don't do it.
  3. Hi! I've finished my maths exploration, but I want to ask something before I send it to my teacher. Are the appendices included in the page count? My exploration is 10 pages long on its own, but I have 6 pages of raw data which my teacher thought would be a good idea to add to the IA so I did. But he or any other IB teacher in my school wasn't able to tell me for sure whether the appendices would count into the 6-12 page limit. I imagine that they wouldn't count, but I don't want to take the risk of losing marks if they do count. Thanks! EDIT: Another question: Should I cite formulas that I have gotten from the textbook or somehow say that they are from the textbook? And include the textbook in the references? Or is it okay to not cite things that you've learned from the course?
  4. I don't know what the rules are, but in my school everyone had to do a traditional presentation in front of the class and the teacher recorded it. And that was the only option for us at least.
  5. I'm not that familiar with your topic, but I get the feeling that it would be a challenge to properly analyse in only 4000 words. But like I said, I don't know if that's true so if you're sure you can cover everything then go for it! The topic otherwise sounds quite alright with me, and I haven't come across it before so it's probably original. One thing: Only three paragraphs for the EE is a little unorganised in my opinion. It seems like something like that would be very exhausting for an examiner to follow. Considering that an essay with, say, 2000 words should aim for at least five main body paragraphs, it feels off to have only three in twice the amount of words. Also, if I were you I would probably compare the three books throughout the EE instead of dedicating one paragraph for one and keeping them mostly separate. For me it seems like a better idea to find common things or something to compare from all of the works and seeing how that one thing is different or similar in them all. If that makes sense. So, you would have paragraphs for one common area and look at the area from the viewpoint of all of the works. But this is just my opinion, do what you feel is best.
  6. I'm done with my EE (except for a bit of editing that needs to be done), Finnish IOP, and my history IA. And I'm mostly done with my maths IA, Finnish WA, and two English WT1s. I have my TOK presentation this month so I'll be done with that pretty soon as well. And I have a solid plan for my bio IA, but I haven't started writing it yet. I think the only things that I haven't worked on that much are the TOK essay and chem IA (I have a plan but my teacher has been gone for the past two weeks so I haven't been able to work on it). It was actually quite nice writing all that down. I've been thinking that I haven't done enough and will be screwed when the deadlines come, but actually I'd say I'm doing pretty well after all.
  7. I have Windows 10 and I think it is at least better than 8.1. I think it's great for the IB because you can split the screen easily between four tasks meaning it's great for multitasking. At first I did have issues with lagging and the toolbar crashing, but those have already passed and now it's working just fine. Can't say much about the privacy though because I don't care much about that so I haven't paid attention to it. But honestly, I'd say it makes absolutely no difference whether you have 7 or 10, your IB experience will not be affected by it at all. So just do what feels best for you. Maybe if you're hesitant about upgrading then you should wait a bit until you're sure that you want it.
  8. You could always go to med school after getting a bachelor's in something else. My plan is to get a bachelor's in biochemistry and applying to med school afterwards is my back-up plan in case a career in biochem related areas isn't right for me after all. So you could think of something like that as well. There are people with English bachelor's and other non-science subjects that get into med school in some countries so you really don't have to go into medicine right after the IB. I think you could easily get into med school after getting a bachelor's in physics as long as you do well in the entrance exams and such. But definitely do your own research to be certain of what your options are.
  9. I'm not the best at dealing with stress, I basically don't deal with it at all because I'm pretty sure it's impossible for me to not be constantly at least a bit stressed out. But anyway, what does help me is going through all the things that are stressing me out and asking myself whether they're actually as urgent as I think. Most of the time I realise that I'm stressing about events or projects that are weeks or months away and there's no need to be anxious yet. And when I have all the things that stress me out written down I can easily plan a schedule to get everything done before their deadlines etc. Though, this is coming from a very type A and very organised person so for you it might not be necessary to plan your weeks so carefully to not be stressed out But honestly, I recommend using your stress as a motivator. There's no secret cure for not feeling stressed from time to time, although you can try and reduce it with things like meditation, yoga, other exercise, music, and anything that makes you feel good. The best way to handle stress, in my opinion, is to use it to make you motivated to study or work on your IAs and EEs. That works for me, at least.
  10. Please show me where you find a laptop cheaper than a macbook that would be better, I am curious! Well, I'm no computer expert, but I've heard that the Dell XPS 13 is better than a Macbook at least. I checked and it's a couple hundred less expensive than a Mac, though the touchscreen version is the same price as a Mac.
  11. That sounds good to me! I think you can talk about the economic deals because knowing about the economy of countries during certain times is valuable historical evidence in my opinion, since it can tell about the motivation behind a country's actions for example. So yes, I think it should be fine. But maybe you can ask the opinion of your history teacher just in case?
  12. In my school HL and SL are always taught together except for the topics that are only for HL. Then the SL students get to miss class for as long as the topic is being taught. And that's how it goes for the entire two years with us. I thought this was the way it was done everywhere else, too, but I guess not? The only exception for this is HL and SL maths, though. Those are never taught together.
  13. You do seem to have a lot on your plate, but if you really do want to take HL maths and are certain that you have the motivation to spend a lot of time studying it then I don't see why you shouldn't take it. But if you're worried about burning out, maybe think about whether HL maths is necessary for your future and make your decision after. Also, you can always start with HL maths and if it's too much, you can switch to SL. By the way, you can be good at maths even if you just take SL. And you can always learn more complicated maths outside school if you want to.
  14. We haven't even chosen our options yet I have my fingers crossed for Biochemistry, but with the amount of future doctors in my class we're probably going to end up doing Option D as well. But anyway, I do think that if you're certain that you would be more comfortable switching to Energy then you should do it. Better now than in May when you're trying to study for finals and can't make sense of medicinal chemistry.
  15. Thank you! That was really helpful! I guess I'm just stressing too much about finding the right topic and making sure that it's as original as possible.
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