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allergictoalliteration

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  • Gender
    Female
  • Exams
    May 2016
  • Country
    India

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  1. Hey everyone! So I'm a May 2016 student. I've "finished" my CAS activities, their reflections, etc. Here's my situation though: Sometime during the end of IB Year 1, our CAS coordinator told us that IB has done away with the 50-50-50 hour system. She said that as long as you have some activity in all three banners, and it all added up to 150 hours, there was no problem. Then, during the beginning of IB Year 2, the CAS coordinator informed us that the IB has done away with the 150-hour system ENTIRELY. Instead, we were to do 2 short-term activities and 1 long-term activity under each banner, C, A, and S. (This also meant rewriting a lot of CAS logs as well as a lot of wasted paper but I'm not going to go into all of that.) However, throughout this period, I found out from friends in other IB schools in my city that they are still using the original 50-50-50 hour system - to this day. So, was there any change in the CAS system for May 2016 candidates? Or are the other IB schools in my city doing it right? And if they have been doing it right, can my school fall into trouble for no longer keeping evidence of our hours?
  2. Sounds good! May I join as well? :3
  3. Technically, you can. However, it is very difficult to write a good and well-scoring extended essay without primary data (investigations). In the words of a 2012 extended essay report from IB, "Essays which are essentially literature-based narratives, where the student’s contribution is confined to assembling the information from (usually) popular literature or web-based sources, continue to be submitted. While examiners search for qualities in these essays that show some merit, and try to reward these, it is often difficult for work of this type to perform well against the assessment criteria (particularly D, E and F). Students at this level rarely have the knowledge or skills to put their personal stamp on data or information that they have obtained from experts or to provide a critical evaluation of the methodologies used or the findings that have been presented. As a result they often end up simply repeating the perspective of the expert whose work they find most persuasive, and reaching a conclusion which is effectively little more than their personal opinion." I would change my RQ to something more investigation-based if I were you. Look for sample biology EEs online to see what is usually expected from a bio EE. Hope this helps.
  4. Yep. And on that note, does anyone know if there is a French group on IB Survival? I haven't come across any so far. As for apps, yes, Duolingo is a good, common one. There's also News in Slow French. (I believe there's a Spanish and Italian version too, and spinoffs in other languages). It has little podcasts of current events spoken in slow-but-not-too-slow French. It has a transcript alongside with translations for highlighted vocab. There is some premium content that has more podcasts and some grammar and idioms and quizzes and stuff, but I find the free content sufficing. I also like Innovative Language for their podcasts. They have absolute beginner to advanced podcasts in 31 languages. Once again, I think the free content is more than enough, but there's some premium content too. Mondly Languages is like Duolingo with more languages, but it has its drawbacks. There is also busuu. It has a community of native speakers along with some exercises to help you learn.
  5. I hear you. Until we got a new teacher this year, our bio class was pretty much struggling on its own. There's a plethora of internet resources. They've helped me keep my grade in a 6-7 range. Our new teacher uses resources from BioNinja and i-Biology. I personally subscribe to youtube channels like Bozeman Science, Alex Lee (I see he's pretty popular on this forum too) and Stephanie Castle. I find MIT OpenCourseWare and khanacademy useful too. CrashCourse is helpful for, um, a crash course. But as you might have guessed, too much information is just as daunting as no information. I tend to keep the syllabus points next to me when I'm studying, so that I don't lose track. I also do past practise papers like the others suggested. And when I'm marking my papers, I look for a pattern of mistakes. If it's related to a particular sub-topic, I revise that topic. Oh, and gather a study group. A lot of my friends and I united last year over the panic and the complaining about the teacher. We sometimes have many TOK-style debates about the Nature of Science portions. And we help each other out with the studying, especially the Applications and Skills. Hope this helps!
  6. You can do the EE on your given topic in Psychology instead of Biology. You can't really experiment on human subjects, especially for a topic like yours. Psychology EEs don't require experimentation, so.
  7. I absolutely adored almost every book I read in my literature course. Tbh I'm a bit surprised that most of them haven't been mentioned. The Color Purple - Alice Walker The Curious Case of the Dog in the Nighttime - Mark Haddon Macbeth - William Shakespeare Poems by John Keats Pride and Prejudice - Jane Austen Snow Country - Yasunari Kawabata Mother Courage and Her Children - Bertolt Brecht
  8. There are some books I found recurring at first glance. House of the Spirits? A Streetcar Named Desire? Brave New World? The Handmaid's Tale? I haven't read any of them. I was just curious about why these books seem to be so popular.
  9. Hello all, (Sorry if I'm doing something wrong here. I'm kinda new.) I'm doing my extended essay in Biology. It involves changes to the hamsters' sleep-wake cycle as an independent variable. However, I'm not sure of the extent to which I can disturb the sleep patterns of hamsters without going against the animal experimentation policy/seeing a fall in my EE grade. Obviously I'm not going to keep the hamster awake for 24 hours. But is a little sleep deprivation (say, 1 or 2 hours) passable? How about just a mere shift in their sleep cycle (say, they sleep and wake up 1-2 hours later than they're used to)? I know that one of the sample Bio EEs circulating the internet has done something similar, involving 1-hour light pulses. Is it okay if I use that procedure? Thanks in advance.
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