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ibislife

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  1. I kind of like the MB tests. I got INTJ last times I've done it. I don't really agree with most psychometric tests I've come across, because I feel that they are neither very accurate, nor meaningful, encouraging, or helping. I've tried some "mock" IQ-tests for different high-IQ societies (different national mensas.) Goes pretty well, I'd say. I still think that it is quite ridiculous. I found ambiguities in the form of more than one correct answer, and brought that up with some hardcore IQ-believer. He was rather rude and refused to even listen to my reasoning. The test only (supposedly) measures logical thinking, and ambition and social skills are perhaps more important in almost all cases anyway. Mathematics is supposedly a good subject for those who are oriented towards logical thinking, but I've read a blog by a person who appearently has very high IQ, but still claims to have failed basic algebra several times. Possibly he claimed that this was because of the IQ, don't really remember. In comparison, I really like the MB in that it shows some sort of approximations of different traits, e g "60% extroverted and 40% introverted." The categories serve to explain common traits of WXYZs, and perhaps come with some general advice e g "if you are an INTJ, it might be understandable that you like to sit alone and work with integral calculus rather than being in class debates. This is quite normal..." Conclusion: Quite a well-formed, varied, and supporting test
  2. ibislife

    Physics Options

    I also take Relativity and Astrophysics. They certainly seem like the more interesting topics. Another advantage is that understanding of one contributes to understanding of another, e. g. Doppler effects for light, gravitational lensing, black holes...
  3. I don't completely understand what you mean by intellectuals. It seems like you both "mean educated people thinking analytically" and "people wih high IQ." Arguably, there exists a correlation between these two groups. Thinking of Western Europe in general, writers, artists, lawyers, etc tend to be non-religious, but so does the rest of the population. Sadly, I can't find any surveys. It would be interesting to see if these are different from people in general.
  4. As people has brought up earlier in this thread, I think that except of possible national and cultural "rootlessness," the main potential problem is that younger people (say 5-18 years) might get too "split" into the different languages. Intellectual maturity, or whatever I should call it, requires strong skills in a native language. This strongly boosts confidence, and this language is working as a thorough system used for thinking. My experience is, sadly, that some people with really multilingual backgrounds end up not fully developing this system. They do not have quite a "feel" for the properties of different words, such as formality - informality, modern - old-fashioned. Also, it feels like they get hung up on different words and literal explanations rather than being able to explain complex situations themselves independently. I do not mean that it is bad to remember terminology, or short, proper definitions, but it becomes absurd when the focus often is to remember a certain syntax. This possibly works for some of the easier exam questions ("Define gravitational potential.") but certainly screws up later on I'm still fairly convinced that multilingualism can be successful, and I'd even prefer to raise bilingual kids. The main reason is the one mentioned earlier in the thread, about how bilingualism helps to increase language (and cultural) awareness. It would be important, though, that it was clear that one of the languages was to be the "main one." That would serve as a connection with the kids' set "first country," most likely my country, and not some unstable place where I do not think they would be fully able to assimilate, or completely safe. I hope I don't sound like a fascist or something, but some things I have seen have really scared me.
  5. ibislife

    medicine

    Also, I think some go to Hungary, and possibly even Bulgaria. Then there is Denmark, but that's not very different.
  6. Nice list! I'll see if I find comp sci and closely related maths any interesting. Combinatorics and applied (in general) seem to be best.
  7. [url="http://bfley.com/ecolint1/index.php?option=com_frontpage&Itemid=1"]The best, really.[/url] Very nice online notes.
  8. I'd do it. Personally, I was about to do something similar, but it didn't work out because of school's scheduling. It is true that maths, physics and chemistry will take up much of your time. However, if you regard these as your first-hand choices, and the ab initio language as something fun on the side, then I don't see how it'd be that big a problem. If you have a fairly easy time learning languages, then lang ab initio is arguably the easiest course you can take. It's a pretty good idea to start with a language now. The sooner the better; you can take post-beginner Spanish when you enter uni. If you feel that Spanish will hinder you from doing well in maths and science, then drop it. I assume you intend to do sci or engineering later on.
  9. Very even poll. Creativity was no problem, and neither was Action. However, Service proved to be quite problematic. I guess I'm just not to eager to "Get Involved!"
  10. Just use "I." We've looked at many past essays during class. The ones that I considered good, without having looked at the marking criteria, normally scored B-C... I panicked when I realized I'd have to include informality, but attempted to do so in the final edition that I wrote the night before deadline. It felt like the title should have been rewritten into something like: "Me and my fantastic intellectual journey through the high school world of unspecified philosophy." I got over it pretty quickly, though.
  11. Seems unlikely. I don't have very many friends. Is Service (in CAS) to technically be considered volunteer work or forced labour?
  12. I'd also say music. Learn/continue practice some instrument. It's more fun if you have classes together with a friend.
  13. [quote name='deissi' post='42017' date='Mar 29 2009, 01:09 PM']Very long. You should avoid having so many 'and's in the topic. Right now, it seems like you wrote about one thing, didn't find enough to say, and added something else.[/quote] Seconded. Also, keep in mind that it [b]must[/b] be literary. I'm sure it is, but when I read the title in my head, it sounded more like psychology. The idea with marriage could also work. For either titile, you certainly have lots of material in the first book. I don't know anything about the second one.
  14. ibislife

    Practice IA help...

    Ok, I've been thinking a bit about it. The [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appeasement"]Wikipedia definition[/url] covers the term pretty well. However, you could easily skip some of the more questionable parts. What is really meant by "rational negotiation" here? I'm sure the IBO isn't that picky, but here comes my suggestion: "[i]Appeasement [/i]was the policy followed by leaders such as Chamberlain during the interwar-years which strived to decrease the risk of a militarty confrontation through means of in passivity, either directly or indirectly, accepting the demands of the other acting party [Germany, etc]." Which is simply a way to put the standard interpretaton. This is lengthy and rather ugly and I'm sure you can get around having to define these terms. I cannot remember whether I had to do so for my investigation, since it was almost six months ago now. However, it was rather difficult to stay within the word length... For [i]aggression,[/i] I think you should ask your teacher. Otherwise, I'd probably go on and make it more precise myself. Your teacher hopefully wouldn't mind. He might even be impressed by your ability to critically examine the question. I'll go back to revision now... or we'll see Best of luck!
  15. These are good examples, and I personally really like [i]One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich[/i]. However, I would advice you to ask your teacher before bringing up more fictious (but still realist first-hand accounts, of course,) literature into your essay.
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