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lastminuteman

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lastminuteman last won the day on January 4 2010

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    Nov 2009
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  1. Hey Howl, Just my two cents: marks aren't everything, they aren't a measure of who you are. The only thing they tell you is how well you're doing at the IB. You really get out what you put into the IB, but I would say generally the effort taken to turn a 6 into a 7 is a lot more than turning a 4 into a 5, or a 5 into a 6. So it really comes down to your personal goals. What are you trying to get out of IB? Do you want a higher score? Or are you trying to just learn as much as possible. I did IB a while ago and it does become a bit of a comparing game, simply because there's not much else to do in our spare time. But at the end of the day you can only put in as much effort as possible and be proud of yourself for doing your best. I would say the best way to improve a mark is to really enjoy the subject. Find things you like. Have a thirst for knowledge. Don't fight the tide, go with it.
  2. IB music was definitely my fun class. Here I am procrastinating for uni by answering your questions. But generally, if you haven't been playing music since Year 7 you're probably going to struggle. You should have a good foundation in musical theory, certainly an appreciation for classical music and many different cultures of music and you should be able to speak the language quite well. This is coming from a class of kids who got mostly 6's I think. I think the standard of performance is generally higher for performance than composition, so if writing music is your strength then you should do well. The main thing is the course really requires you to be an all-rounded musician, both in performance and in an academic context. It's a heap of fun, get your IA's done in time and start them early. I'd say if you do all this it's hard to not get a 5.
  3. I did my MI under the old syllabus. From my understanding, you have to compare pieces of music from two different cultures by commenting on the similarities of certain musical aspects, so that's harmonies, scales, rhythms... you want to be using musical examples (i.e. scores or transcriptions) to demonstrate your points. So I did Flamenco music (culture from world music) and rock. I compared the use of ostinato (repeated rhythmical patterns) between the two. I also looked at chord progressions, features in vocal melodies (i.e. melismas). Now, I might think that reggae and jazz could be too close because they're both modern very Western forms of music. You'd be wanting to compare world music and western, and even better if they're from different time periods. The main thing is though the strength of the musical analysis. Just find stuff that you can really analyse the music of and you'll be fine.
  4. I thought Chem HL was evil. I was saved by an easy paper 3 and pracs, but I probably only just scraped my 6's. The multi choice contained a few questions where I wasn't sure what topic it was talking about. I stuffed up paper 2 like nobody's business, timing it absolutely horribly and choosing an option that I could only answer half of.
  5. Our school never told us our predicted grades (if we got any). I'd say predicted grades don't really have a factor with uni admission here, but maybe not telling is our school's policy. But if we did get predicted grades, that could explain why my co-ordinator thought I'd be disappointed with my results when I got them, which I was definitely, definitely not. Maybe my teachers gave me a generous prediction, though I thought I'd be mid-high thirties after the exams. I only got 34/42 on my last set of practice exams which means I must have improved a lot in a couple of weeks. My school has a couple of 45's, I think maybe 1/5th of us got 40 or above and so far I've heard of 4 higher level English 7's, which usually only happens once or so a year. And maybe everyone got 30 or above here which means our IB class this year is really good. Congrats to everyone so far!
  6. Think of the IB as all of the mental conditioning for academics you'll ever need. I got my results today and it's in fact a very great feeling. I don't think anything at all went perfectly and I fought for every mark. For those who tried their hardest, they got the most out of it. You can pick up self-organisation and time management skills that will be a great help in uni (or I hope) and success in future careers. You also learn how to drop everything when you're under time pressure and go for it. Something that I really picked up from this program is confidence, confidence in my future self to be able to tackle (almost) anything. If you slack off, you're not going to get as much out of it. You take out of it what you put in. If you're not motivated to succeed, or don't want to succeed, don't do it. The IB is far from easy. It is tough, it is awful, it is mentally draining, especially if you don't put the hard work in early enough. It is physically exhausting and it will make you feel at one of your lowest points, but what you gain and how you feel, your very self-satisfaction is the most rewarding. I feel a heavy weight has been lifted off my shoulders. I do not regret doing the IB at all.
  7. The most important thing that you must do as soon as possible is to get your hands on the criteria. There's also an 'additional clarification' booklet published by the IBO. There, it defines what constitutes a musical culture and what's a good media format. Your teacher must have a copy. If he doesn't, download it. Criteria is the most important thing to follow in the IB. In a nutshell, a musical culture is a different way or style of making music. Generally, comparing two different pieces of world music is fine, but they have to have different influences, for example, it wouldn't be so wise to compare two different pieces of South American music in the same style of folk music. You've definitely selected two distinct musical cultures here, but I'd recommend finding many links that you can draw between the two pieces. The links should be musical, and although you can compare two songs with the same purpose, you *have* to talk about the music. The similarities can be as simple as instrumentation, although comparing into more depth such as what figures of the scale are used in the melody and what is the texture of the accompaniment. If you're stuck for a topic, find some world music CD's and look for really obvious similarities between two pieces. Are there prominent drums in both pieces? Is there a repeated ostinato/riff in the bass? You also can look at differences too... is the guitar being fingerpicked in one whilst the other strumming power chords? The most important thing is that you're talking about the music itself. Find a strong musical link that you can look into some depth, and then listen to the pieces over and over, write everything you can think about them (musical features, harmonies, rhythm, texture, instrumentation, structure etc.), drawing similarities and differences. Now, with that being said, do the analysis first, and like you'd write up a year 8 history report, put all of your information into a format. Magazine articles are pretty safe, but you have to present it like one. Websites are pretty common, but I think it has to be a mass media format, so maybe don't try the powerpoint.
  8. Timetable your time heavily and set alarms. Get yourself into a routine of working to a schedule and make yourself guilty if you take too long of a break. Don't try and be over-ambitious with your timetable, and certainly do not procrastinate. Some people went down the deleting facebook (temporarily) route, but I think taking the internet cable out whilst you study is worth it.
  9. Our co-ordinator gave everyone results today: English A1 SL - 6 Mandarin B SL - 6 Philosophy HL - 6 Chemistry HL - 6 Mathematics SL - 7 Music HL - 7 TOK: B EE: A Bonus Points: 3 Total Points: 41 Result: very very surprised and happy I know for at least three of my subjects I would have just scraped the mark.
  10. Hi all, There's about one month left before the finals: how did/do you stay motivated studying for the finals? I'm a big sufferer of apathy, a big procrastinator and a big youtube binger. Obviously I'm not asking for your direct motivation (is that possible over the internet somehow?) but some tips would be very well appreciated.
  11. You could do an article and still include pictures. Don't get lulled in by creative media formats... one guy tried doing a talk show and got about 4 or 5 out of 20 because they focused on the media format too much. Do the research first and make your comparisons, then get your media format.
  12. Hey dude, I'm sitting my final paper this November but I think you guys have a new syllabus by your exams. That being said, the listening paper should be the same, and in these listening papers, there's rarely any pop songs. It's a bit of a bubble-burster, but you need to start verging away from that. Do you have a textbook? I have music: An Appreciation which outlines some key pieces from all of the periods of Western Art music, as well as some world music and modern stuff too. Key things to listen to? I'll just give you a start of the stuff I reckon's vital for you to know: Classical/Western Art Music: -Medieval -Baroque Period -Classical Period -20th Century Music (i.e. search for minimalism, serialism on youtube and give the topic a look on wikipedia) Wikipedia is a good starting point. Research who defined what era and start listening to their works. Some key ones would be all of the famous guys: Mozart, Bach, Beethoven... those sorta guys... Then... there's World music. There's a few World Music textbooks out there which are a good guide... but what I reckon you want to start doing is documenting musical characteristics of each geographical region. Things that I think are relatively common are Indian Classical Music and Middle Eastern music. Got alternative radio stations? And I mean, stations that play classical or foreign language music. Record some of that music and start writing about what you hear. If you're confused, ring them up or do a Wikipedia about the music of different continents/countries. By the end of the course you should be able to hear ANY piece of music and identify its rough: time of composing, geographical location and characteristic musical features. Hope that helped. Good luck!
  13. I know nothing about eco, but 'ripped off' is probably talking about excess money slugged when the consumer buys the product. So... taking into account the development and productions costs, how much profit are they making on the game per unit? You'd need to dig up some mighty fine statistics about what's involved in making/producing/promoting that game. Fun-sounding topic, but if it's too hard to execute, then change.
  14. Non-official assessments and tests are supposed to help you show where you are, and where you need to improve. If it doesn't count for your final IB grade, don't get stressed out on the grade. Get stressed out on how you're going to improve. If it is, however your final IB grade then uh...
  15. Hey guys, I'm just about to start my final semester of IB, and I'm doing a 6 subject load. The IA's are killing me. I've got the EE, TOK essay, a couple more written papers, and oral preparation for English and my second language... most due in the next couple-a weeks ...but I still have one week of holidays to do them all. Ha-ha! Any self motivation pointers out there? Because I'm in one of those apathy zones and if I don't get out of it soon (spending way too much time on the internet) I'm going to fail. Help! lastminuteman (the username is coming more and more true every day)
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