Jump to content

redpanda_19

Members
  • Content count

    12
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    1

redpanda_19 last won the day on April 1 2016

redpanda_19 had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

4 Unknown

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Female
  • Exams
    May 2016
  • Country
    China

Recent Profile Visitors

1,147 profile views
  1. The IB program is challenging and time consuming, but ultimately rewarding and enjoyable. Make sure you choose subjects you like, and not just because of how easy they are (I still kick myself for choosing economics SL over psychology SL or History SL). Your grades sound good. Are you good at time-management? Time management is an important skill because of the amount of revision and internal assessments you will need to do. For example, in English Lit HL you will cover a lot of books/poems and there will be several internal assessments (IOP, IOC and WIT) in addition to your final exam. On top of your subject workload, there will be other requirements such as the infamous extended essay (4000 word essay, see EE forum for more details) and TOK (theory of knowledge) presentations and a TOK essay of 1400-1600 words. You are also required to complete CAS (creativity, action and service projects) - if you do not do these you will not get the diploma. Overall the workload is manageable and you will still have a social life/sleep as long as you manage your time well and don't procrastinate. Some people in my school don't sleep at all; others like me manage to have a healthy sleeping schedule and exercise. I hope this helps
  2. Honestly Biology HL is great if you like the content. It's hard at first, adjusting to the workload and the huge amount of content you have to learn but it's extremely interesting. It's worth the effort. Familiarize yourself with the syllabus. Read the textbook before class. Make notes before the test. Ask questions, read outside material to boost your own knowledge. The SL parts often contain topics taught in IGCSE (though it is usually more in depth) so spend more time on HL parts. I find it easiest to understand bio by 'applying' it to everyday life, like when I go for a booster shot at the doctor's I think of all the immunology stuff I've been learning - this is the way I remember things. Test-wise, do past paper questions (find these online!) and try and follow the mark-scheme. My advice for Chemistry is pretty much the same
  3. I agree with Vioh. Value is subjective; it depends on the knower. In many cases the value is unquantifiable. As I am also doing question 4, I focused on the following areas of knowledge, arts and mathematics. The application of art may not be as practical as say, mathematical modeling of an epidemic, but it cannot be said its value is incomparable. Art inspires ideas - look at how music inspired Einstein.
  4. Ooh, which 2 poems? From The World's Wife? I didn't present on Carol Ann Duffy; most people in HL lit at my school did their presentations on The Road, including myself. However, one my classmates made a model of the setting in The Road, and then superbly linked it to her presentation (the Boy's head was a candle holder, as he had 'the fire'). You could also make your own poem based on Carol Ann Duffy's structure and language. Actually, the best way to make it interesting for the audience is for your presentation to be interesting. That is, you shouldn't be reading off the powerpoint slide, or standing awkwardly on the side. Sound interested, vary your tone, use body language to emphasize certain things. Put interesting photos on your powerpoint slides - I put a huge picture of Two-Face on one my slides to emphasize the dual nature of fire (nurturer and destroyer).
  5. Hello! I'm not doing this question, I'm doing question 4. However, my friend is doing this question. I believe you should make sure to have personal examples - for example, a friend of mine is referring to her Christian upbringing and how it affected her in certain ways. Make sure to refer to the ways of knowing - perception, obviously, as it is mentioned in the question, and another one? Areas of knowledge are important and should be referred to. Since you're talking about cognition and culture, perhaps human sciences. Even though you agree, try to find counter-arguments for your point, and then counter those rebuttals in your conclusion! I hope this helps you I'm handing in my first draft on Thursday!
  6. Haha, I am exactly the same. I had my IOPs though and I did a good job, so here are some tips: Practice in front of a mirror. Make sure you look at yourself and maintain eye contact with your reflection. If you forget a word or phrase, stop and pause. Don't panic or flail, but rather relax give a thoughtful pause (it sounds smarter than a frantic 'um') Practice with your friends or family - make them judge your body language, your volume. I always had a problem with speaking loud enough, so I would get my sister to stand at the back of a room while I stood at the front and talked, and later asked if she could hear me. When you present, before you start talking take a deep breath and scan the audience. It helps to pause and smile. Remember that these are the classmates you've worked with. Remember that all of them have to present later. If one of them has presented already, think 'If X can do it so can I!' If you have a friend in the audience, glance at her/him during your presentations to give yourself confidence. Before our presentations my friend and I made an agreement to encourage each other during the course of our presentations by smiling and looking interested.
  7. Here are some of my suggestions: Read up on literary devices and important terminology. I've been getting 7s but not as good as they could be because I lack the technical terms, such as caesura or enjambement, etc. Have a clear opening thesis to start with, to outline your main points of discussion. Include the author/poet's name and the title of the piece (like Shootingstar16 said). If you need to add context, talk about it in the intro and then go into more depth by linking it with your points below. You can analyze chronologically or thematically. It's easier to do it chronologically; it's more methodical and you go step by step through the piece, so you won't forget or miss out on important tidbits. It's also a pretty clear structure. However if you find that there are 2 or 3 main themes that really stick out at you then do it thematically. That way your essay will be more cohesive. PETAL paragraphs are good - Point, Evidence, Technique, Analysis, Link. You don't have to quote the whole thing, but when you quote make sure it's a direct quote. If you're quoting 2 lines from a poem, then don't write it all in one line - show the line break with a /. Use the conclusion to sum up your arguments and maybe a little of a personal reflection on the essay. But don't break too far away from the point of the novel/poem. For example when I wrote an essay on Soap Suds I wrote how it causes the audience to also reflect on childhood in a busy world. I hope this helps
  8. I want a 45...but anything like 40+ wouldn't be frowned upon... ><
  9. I'm an INTJ as well. I'm barely 5 feet. I find it pretty hard to make friends or to start conversations, and I usually wait for other people to talk. Thankfully I've found friends who are just as awkward and introverted as I am. I'm still jittery around people and I fidget when I talk to people who I'm not used to. My introvertedness has gotten better though, because over the past few years I've forced myself to do debate and MUN and mock trial and all of these activities have increased my self confidence. You might want to try doing something like that? I'm actually going to a summer debating program. In all probability I'm going to get crushed and destroyed, but hopefully I will gain some speaking skills
  10. Some of the things I'm doing/have done that are a little leadership-y Student LibrarianCo-leader of a book clubCo-leader of the school student-led magazine, PandoraPrefect teamTeaching Migrant School students science (weekly workshop)World Scholar's CupMock-trial clubInternational Award/Duke of Edinburgh awardI hope this will help you. Start a club! My friend started an art club called Performance Art, basically they do some street performances in our school at lunchtimes. They basically painted themselves the color of sofas and slept in armchairs/floor in a public area for most of lunch.
  11. Hi! This is my first year of IB, but I did my IOP before the winter holidays. Start with perhaps a general summary of your theme or introduce the question. Maybe spend 2 or 3 slides on each point that you're using for your argument/topic. Don't put too many words, or too many animations. Add pictures. If you have a significant quote use 1 slide for it, perhaps, and bullet-points with important ideas you want to touch upon. Use your cue cards to expand on those ideas. Keep your presentation chronological if possible so that the audience won't get lost. I hope this helps!
  12. Here's a bit more information on my ideas... There are many literary critics/people in general who compare McMurphy to Christ, especially because of the great amounts of biblical imagery (e.g. his 'last supper', Billy as Judas). To the men McMurphy is a hero, who steps in and saves them from the clutches of the libido-draining Nurse Ratched. However, in my opinion for all the Christ-like imagery in the novel, he is a misogynist hero, who should be more feared for his suggested alternative to the Combine and not admired. While Nurse Ratched is by no means an amazing caretaker, his attack -which David Vitkus calls a rape - is crude and uncalled for. While the Combine is terrible, his alternative is no better. Perhaps he is nothing more than a cog in the machine of the Combine. He is not unique; Nurse Ratched says that he reminds her of 'Mr. Taber', a manipulator who she treated. The only difference is that he managed to destroy her power, at the cost of his life. His handshake with Chief Bromden seems to symbolize the transfer of power/of his masculinity. Chief Bromden will be the next to take the mantle, although in what way Ken Kesey has not yet explained. Links to this can be seen as the plot progresses; McMurphy grows weaker under the strain of battling against Nurse Ratched while Chief Bromden's words and descriptions become richer, and he grows bolder. McMurphy's Promethean hero, his aggressive Cowboy attitude is far too conspicuous and dangerous for the Combine to allow to live. Therefore, he must die. Perhaps the only real way to survive and really win against the Combine then, is to follow in Chief Bromden's ways. Timothy Leary, in his book High Priest coined a term called 'bemushroomed heroes', which are basically men who are 'disaffiliated from society and are considered expendable by the structure', and have no interest fighting against the structure. They are passive men who go with the flow. Chief Bromden is one of these. He silently judges Nurse Ratched, but never really puts up a fight against her control. In the end, because of McMurphy's sacrifice, he is able to leave; he leaves with his life and without the Combine ever noticing - this is a true heroic accomplishment. So that's all I really have for now. This will be the general direction of my essay (if I get to write it). I've been reading quite a few academic articles and essays. Basically I want to stress his misogynistic attitude and expand upon the concept of Promethean and Bemushroomed heroes. I have no idea how to phrase my research question appropriately: "To what extent can McMurphy be considered a heroic character" seems rather inadequate. Please tell me if all this is ok, or if it's much too vague...I've heard that One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is overdone and my examiners will be quite bored, so I didn't want to stick with a typical theme of Racism or Individualism.
  13. Hi! I'm kinda new to this community. This is a question about my english EE. I'm thinking of doing an EE in defense of Nurse Ratched from 'One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest'. However, I'm not sure how to formulate my research question. My main theme will probably be 'Misogyny in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest'. Do you think a question like 'To what extent can RP McMurphy be considered a heroic character' is appropriate?
×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.