George

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About George

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  • Gender
    Female
  • Exams
    Nov 2018
  • Country
    Australia

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  1. Hi there, I'm really glad I could help you, I've made so many mistakes with studying since starting IB and I'd like to help others not make the same ones! Anyway, the answer to both your questions is no, but that's only my personal preference based on a couple of things. Firstly, I have a class for my HL subjects 4 days out of 5 in the week. I have put my study days for each of these subjects on the day that I don't have that class during the week, and as I said earlier I really try to get all my notes/prereading done well before it is taught in class. I have been known to get an entire term's worth of notes done on the holidays, though that hasn't happened in a while The upshot of this is that by the time I really try to concentrate and engage in class, and I am well ahead in terms of understanding, I am pretty much revising these subjects 5/7 days a week. For SLs it's a similar situation, although only 4 times a week as I have lessons 3 times a week. While scientifically repetitive practice is probably better, I find that this is the best way for me to still be interested and not burn out, as I have pretty bad anxiety and can get completely overwhelmed with a study schedule with 3-4 subjects per day (especially if I 'miss' a time slot - because I have a demanding family life and get exhausted if I'm not in bed by 9.30 so it's hard to make up for it). Even so I know a lot of people do this and it works for them, so maybe give it a try. I'll just give you an example of my studying to do lists for a typical day (this was yesterday's): Thursday (Econ): - Notes on 3.1 Free trade and protectionism - Print and annotate article for International Trade IA - Outline and graphs for IA - Practice questions for 2.2 AD and AS (we're up to 2.2 in class but i'm already up to 3.1 in notes lol) - Update physics IA method and materials - Standardisation calculations for Chem IA - Email EE supervisor about change of topic. So I mean as you can see, I do work for other subjects as well but generally more admin stuff/the kind of thing that doesn't require me to learn anything new. I do the main 'focus' first while my brain is still functioning, and move onto easier stuff later in the day. However, as I get closer to final exams I will probably start incorporating daily quizlets for some of my subjects like Chem and French, but at the moment I can cram a term's definitions before the exam with no trouble, so it's not at the top of my priority list. Hope that clarifies things a bit! You should definitely do what works for you as I know I have a pretty unique method specific to my own needs.
  2. subject choice

    In my opinion, definitely HL English if you are good at it! HL is not a lot more work than SL, while in Physics there are more topics and the questions are a lot harder.
  3. organization

    I use a bullet journal, but I don't put a lot of effort into it. I used to and found that it doesn't really help much nor motivate me, you might be different. However, I DEFINITELY recommend it over a planner as you have so much more flexibility and space to write in if necessary. I don't even bother with putting a calendar in my bullet journal, I just put my deadlines into Google Calendar and then look at that when I'm planning in my journal. Since deadlines are known to change, I find this a lot easier than having to go back and white-out different things. I guess it all depends on what works for you and what motivates you, but having had experience with many different planning and productivity methods, I can confidently say that there are no major drawbacks of chilling out somewhat
  4. Hi Vivian, It mainly depends on how you prefer to take notes. I like to take my notes in onenote, and I have a very specific method for doing so, but I know a lot of people prefer to write them and I can't really help you with that. I usually just type up my notes and then print them out before the exam to highlight and annotate them. Then before the exam I just BURN through a bunch of cheap exercise books. With that in mind, here are my suggestions: - a good, reliable calculator with graphing functions - a good laptop - I use windows as onenote functions better, but if you are committed to Apple there are ways to work around this - a decent hard drive (some textbooks are really big and you need to be backing up your work) - heaps and heaps of cheap exercise books - these can be found at office supplies outlets particularly around the time of the 'back to school' sales. Use one per subject per term if you can afford it - you'll thank yourself when you're looking for worked examples later. - pick ONE kind of pen you like and stick with it. Idk if this is just superstition but I think using the same pen in practice and in the exam will help you remember content - if you want to be really fancy you could have a different kind for each subject! - Coloured pens, highlighters, sticky notes if you are a colourful learner! - A big roll of butchers paper for doing mind maps on - this is great for brainstorming assignments and linking concepts you've learnt. - Some kind of planning method - I have a very sloppy, basic and badly executed bullet journal, but that really works for me as I like things to be flexible. If you want a calendar based planning diary and are willing to commit to the upkeep, that is also a good option. It's always okay to change later and experiment with what works for you, there's no one system that is a lot better or worse. - If you are a flashcard type, buy lots of those as well. Personally, I just use quizlet but everyone is different. That's pretty much all I use, I hope that helps. PM me if you have any further questions
  5. In my opinion, if you have an aptitude for Lit HL it's not really more work than SL, though I'm sure this varies school to school. In my case all I have to do is concentrate on annotations in class, get my assignment drafts done early, and make summaries of feedback on my exams, but I've always done well in English without putting much effort in. Probably for IOC it's a bit harder as there is more content to analyse but I still know a lot of people who hardly studied until the end and got 24-26/30. Of course if you have had to work for the grades you've achieved in English so far, this might not be the case so you should just see how the beginning of IB treats you In terms of general study advice, there are a few things I thought of that might help you. Firstly, one of my good friends did middle school in Canada and found that the content taught did NOT prepare her for IB, so she eventually had to drop to Maths Studies. If you want to stay in SL I would be prioritising Maths, particularly in trying to make sure you've covered all the prior learning topics covered in the syllabus. Secondly, I have tried so many different methods of studying and found that the best way to do it is just to have one 'focus' subject per day - for example my schedule is Monday - Chem Tuesday - Maths Wednesday - Lit Thursday - Econ Friday - EE Saturday - Physics Sunday - TOK/French That's not to say I don't do other subject's work on these days, but I find that having a focus helps me keep things balanced and that none of my subjects get too far behind. I study every day, with no holidays or breaks, though some days I don't do much at all. This might seem intense but it's really not as I often don't study for more than half an hour or so, but I find that staying in the habit is very important. The main area where I feel like IB students slack off is that they don't recognise the value of actually paying attention in class. Just because all the notes are online doesn't mean your teacher doesn't have something to add - and at the very least it should be obvious that since you spend most of your day in class, you should be doing something while you're there! The best way to make the most of this time is to make your notes before class, and according to the syllabus points as closely as you can. I use Onenote to do this - I make a section for each part of the syllabus and then a page for each subtopic. This varies between subjects how I organise it, but for all of my subjects I use Onenote's tagging system to organise and highlight my notes as I go. These tags include: things to research further, questions I need to ask my teacher, key definitions/graphs/equations, common mistakes in the exam, notes on common questions on a topic that comes out in the exam, and finally a red-yellow-green method for traffic lighting each syllabus point so I know what I need to work on. Then, in the week before my exams, I just click 'find tags' and everything is collated for me in a summary page. If you don't use onenote I don't know how you could recreate this except by hand, but let me tell you this method is INCREDIBLY helpful. Once you've made your preliminary notes (and you should do some research on what resources are the best for each subject - don't rely on your teacher for this), then you can go through and work out what you need to understand in class and what questions you need to ask your teacher. Teachers are here to help you, so make the most of it! And add whatever new understandings you have to your original notes. If you do this throughout the term, and complete whatever homework and practice questions are set for you, then by the time you get to exams you should be ready to just throw yourself into practice questions (questionbank is good for this) while referring to the notes you've made. Mark all of them, and make a list of 'silly mistakes' and things you need to remember to look over immediately before the exam. When you get your marked exams back, make sure you really go through them and understand where you are making mistakes, and if you have a holiday immediately after then this is a great opportunity to revise those topics. Believe in your ability, stay committed and you will achieve a lot! If you have any more questions feel free to PM
  6. Do you have the ability at your school to take 4 HLs? I know plenty of people who have done a similar thing to you (going from a harder Language A1 SL course to an easier Language B HL course) while still keeping all their original HL subjects. Of course this will mean more time in class, but will probably be easier for you than your current situation and should result in the required grades and qualifications
  7. Hi All, I'm being cheeky and copying in my post in the EE forum as I think it might have a better chance here So I have been researching a lot about what book/s I should do for my EE. One of the aspects of literature that really interests me is the use of magical realism and mysticism in modern literature. I was wondering if anyone could give me any pointers around the following topics - I know the research questions aren't too well formulated but my supervisor should be able to help with that, she just doesn't know much about any of the books or topics I want to write about at this point. - How does Tony Morrison use mystical elements in Beloved to portray the psychological impact of slavery? - How are mystical elements employed in Zadie Smith's 'White Teeth' and Haruki Murakami's 'Kafka On The Shore'? (or maybe The Wind Up Bird Chronicle) - Possibly some kind of comparison of Zadie Smith's 'On Beauty' and E.M. Forsters 'Howard's End' as the former is based on the latter, however I don't really know whether that's a good idea or how I would go about it. If you have an opinion on which question is best, or have read any of the books and could let me know whether you think they'd work for an EE, I'd really appreciate it
  8. Guys, I'm going to reply to my own topic just in case it helps any of you in future! So I ended up doing: English Literature HL Maths SL French SL (ab initio) Economics HL Physics SL Chemistry HL So actually not all that different to what I initially thought. However, the main difference ended up being that Economics is only offered at Higher Level at my school (weird I know) and I could NEVER have coped with HL math, despite my apparent confidence at the time. I don't regret my subject choices or my science choices specifically, as I find that maths, physics and chemistry particularly have great cross-subject content links that really help me understand the disciplines cohesively, despite the fact that I am not very interested in maths or science. At the moment, I'm sitting on 4 6s and a 7 (The 7s are in Lit HL and French). Hopefully this helps someone!
  9. Hi guys, So I have been researching a lot about what book/s I should do for my EE (due 2018 but I need my topic in the next month or so). One of the aspects of literature that really interests me is the use of magical realism and mysticism in modern literature. I was wondering if anyone could give me any pointers around the following topics - I know the research questions aren't too well formulated but my EE supervisor should be able to help with that, she just doesn't know much about any of the books or topics I want to write about at this point. - How does Tony Morrison use mystical elements in Beloved to portray the psychological impact of slavery? - How are mystical elements employed in Zadie Smith's 'White Teeth' and Haruki Murakami's 'Kafka On The Shore'? (or maybe The Wind Up Bird Chronicle) - Possibly some kind of comparison of Zadie Smith's 'On Beauty' and E.M. Forsters 'Howard's End' as the former is based on the latter, however I don't really know whether that's a good idea or how I would go about it. Also, for what its worth, if you think all of these are terrible and I need to start again, please let me know Thank you so so much!!
  10. Hi guys! I will be starting the Pre-IB next year and though I have read as much as I can about the subjects available to me, I just wanted to see if I could get some more opinions on what will give me the best chance of doing well. Some background - I lean pretty strongly towards the English side of things, however I'm also quite good at maths so I'm hoping that will carry me through the rest of the subjects. Anyway, if any of you could offer some insight into my choices then I'd really appreciate it - and hopefully others will also find the poll useful At the moment I am leaning towards the following: English Literature HL Maths HL French SL Economics SL Physics SL Chemistry HL