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MarieLarissa

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  • Gender
    Female
  • Exams
    May 2015
  • Country
    Canada

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  1. Buy books- I love that new book smell (despite the cost)! Would you rather: 1.) Write the IB Physics HL Exam or 2.) Write a new extended essay
  2. Firstly, I believe that your school has to "accept" you as a retake candidate in conjunction with IB. Secondly, I believe it costs around $250.00 CDN for a subject retake. Finally, you would likely have to re-do the entire examination and any additional components which have been added (if a new curriculum has been undertaken for the upcoming academic session). I have never done a retake, this is merely what I found online. Hopefully this helps!
  3. At my school, our teachers assigned the topic of "health", and my group and I did a presentation on sun safety/the effectiveness of sunscreen and the effects on one's health.
  4. My teacher always suggested doing something unique that has a controversy built around it (or something that you can analyze thoroughly that the examiner will not know a lot about). Examples of good topics can be something that is related to your town/city/country which you can find information on, or something controversial (ex. exploring the cause of death of Napoleon Bonaparte). As the others have asserted, questions that can be answered with "yes" or "no" are NOT good questions whatsoever. Often times questions beginning with "to what extent" or "how true is it to say" are good research questions (in my opinion). Good luck on your IA!
  5. My teacher (who I talked to after being very close to the next mark boundary) recommended not to get a re-mark unless it directly affects your acceptance into university as your marks can go both up and down. As well, it costs approximately $200.00 (CDN) to re-mark an exam, so if sufficient funds are a problem, the re-mark may not be your best route. Finally, as others have stated both bio and business seem to be pretty objective (not like English or History) so it is unlikely there will be a drastic change up or down in marks. Ultimately whether you get a 6 or 7, it really doesn't matter as either marks show that you have put considerable effort into your courses (as well, you are not defined by an exam mark). However, congratulations on fantastic exam marks and be proud of yourself (hopefully my suggestions can help you decide a bit)!
  6. Yes it is completely doable. However I would recommend doing it during the summer (not whilst all of the other IB courses are in full swing as you will have more time to understand the material without having to worry about other courses). My teacher was not the most helpful and essentially told us to learn the IB Bio HL curriculum from the textbook or BioNinja which are both great resources. Good Luck!
  7. Firstly, I am a vegetarian. I understand that the implications of being a vegetarian affects both me, my family, the agriculture industry, and in general terms: the world. However, one assumption must be dealt with prior to debating the ethicality of consuming meat: the idea of animal sentience (essentially that animals can feel pain/emotions). In The Cambridge Declaration on Consciousness, a major study was undertaken to try and prove animal sentience. What was found was that animals do not have a neocortex, but have the ability to feel and have intentional behaviours. Of course this is merely a scientific finding which may be later changed due to new findings, those who argue that animals "cannot feel pain" may need to do some further investigation into animal sentience. There has yet to be any scientific findings in regards to the sentience of plants, thus an assumption I make as a vegetarian is that plants are not sentient (however this can be completely incorrect). Depending upon one's own set of morals, consuming meat can be seen as both ethical and un-ethical. To the non-vegetarian, consuming meat can be seen as ethical as they are supporting the agriculture industry (the farmers, their families, and the companies responsible for the "Factory Farm"), thus allowing agriculturally based communities to grow and be supported via the purchase of meat products. As well, the non-vegetarian can see consuming meat as ethical because they are essentially putting the livestock which are raised on factory farms out of their misery. The factory farm can be described as a place where (for example) 50,000 chickens can live in "long, windowless shed on the floor" (Singer, Peter. "Down On the Factory Farm." In Animal Liberation. 2nd ed. New York. NY. 1990.) and a pecking order thus ensues in which some chickens become more aggressive and eat and kill other chickens due to the development of this pecking order (Singer, Peter. "Down On the Factory Farm." In Animal Liberation. 2nd ed. New York. NY. 1990.). In this case, consuming meat can be seen as ethical as it lessens the pain felt by various animals on the Factory Farm as the pecking order results in the death/injury of other weaker chickens. Conversely, vegetarianism can be seen as ethical as it supports Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs. By becoming vegetarian, one could potentially redistribute the grain fed to animals on Factory Farms to the nearly 805 million starving and malnourished people in the world. This would mean that these animals raised in "Factory Farms" could potentially be released into the wild, allowing for their happiness to be increased (assumption) and for the happiness and basic need of nourishment to be met for the 805 million starving people in the world (food is the foundation of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs- thus the redistribution of grain would allow these 805 million people to develop belonging/love, self-esteem and the peak of the hierarchy: self-actualization). It should be noted that only 21.5 million people would have to become vegetarian and support the redistribution of grain for this to happen (and of course for the various grain producing companies to support this). Another way in vegetarianism can be seen as ethical is that it tries to support the idea that animals have the right to life and freedom from pain. To me, this is a major reason why I am vegetarian as I feel that although animals may not have the capability to make the decision to live or die, they should have the right to not have this decision made for them by humans. Finally, I would like to assert that it is ultimately the choice of the individual and their own personal set of morals/what they deem as ethical which corresponds to their decision to become vegetarian or not (as this is a pretty cyclical argument in which one could spend years on). However, I would like to pose a question to the non-vegetarians: what gives you (as a human) the right to take a life in order to nourish yourself (when considering that it is not necessary as there are healthy ways of eating such as vegetarianism in which animals are not killed)?
  8. I would suggest a reassessment. Perhaps you can still get your diploma with a mark of 24. Like others have stated, re-evaluating ITGS or possibly Film could result in you receiving your diploma with a score of 24.
  9. A month is more than enough. I did the vast majority of work on my essay in a matter of a week (and I received 36/36). However, it depends on the topic. If your EE is a sciences essay, it will take more time than per se a philosophy (which was like mine) as for the sciences you have to conduct experiments/research etc.
  10. Hi there, I did a similar topic in regards to Nazi Germany (mine was a bit different as it incorporated the influence of Nietzsche's philosophy on the Third Reich) and I found that my university library had the most helpful books as they contained a lot of detailed information. As others have stated JSTOR and EBSCO Host are great options as well. Furthermore, I would look into documentaries (I.e. On Netflix, History Channel, etc) as well as audiobooks (which really helped me with my IA). Good luck!
  11. Hi, Where I live in Canada, it is the provincial diploma that is required for entrance to a university, not the IB diploma (seeing ass the vast majority do not take IB). I think your offer should still be valid, but I would call the university just to double check. However seeing as you put effort into taking IB, I would inquire about a re-mark on the history as it would allow you to earn your diploma (and you are close.... Only 2 marks off... But understand that there is a chance you may not receive the 2 marks and that you will have to pay for the re-mark). I too am two marks off from a different grade boundary for IB history and I am considering appealing my mark as well. Hopefully everything turns out (best of luck)!
  12. Okay, thanks! Have you ever had a remark (or has anyone else on this thread)? I'm just curious to see if anyone else has had any luck with history or english marks.
  13. I essentially signed up for IB courses in the spring (knowing what I was getting myself into) alongside a short "About Me" form. At my school there was no official application or test designed to differentiate between those who should take IB and those who should not. However, by grade 11 many students who entered grade 10 Pre-IB had dropped many IB courses and thus there was only 10 IB diploma graduates in grade 12 (as this pattern continued). I am surprised to hear that some had to pay for IB courses (at my school they were completely free).
  14. Hi and congratulations to all fellow May 2015 exam writers who received their marks! I am wondering whether it makes sense to you guys to inquire about a re-mark of an IB HL History exam which was 2 marks away from a 7, and an IB HL English exam which was 3 marks away from a 7? Seeing as I get extra "top-up" money from my university for high IB marks (I get more money for a 7 than a 6), does it make sense to bite the bullet and speak with my co-ordinator about getting my exams re-marked? Thanks (in advance)!
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