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Jerry

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    18
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10 Good

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Exams
    May 2017
  • Country
    United States

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    @a_doseofjerry

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  1. Jerry

    Should i take ib

    I don't know about others, but one of my most favorite aspects about IB is the community that it forms. As your fellow IB students wage this academic war against the expectations of IB and your teachers, you eventually form a bond of mutual empathy to make each other feel better. (Haha). One thing that happens is the IB students you are always around become almost family, provided that you think they're tolerable. It's the community aspect that I really appreciate and enjoy, because even if you believe that the curriculum is difficult or are just simply stressed out, there is always a helping hand that understands you because everyone that you interact with are going through similar struggles. Just my two cents.
  2. Jerry

    Grading Scale

    I think it's quite ridiculous, as a student in a school district that tests incredibly often, I can't say that I see any benefits to testing in general, and I believe the current system puts way too much emphasis on standardized tests. (Thanks to IB, a lot of the exams we are exempt from, but I cannot begin to understand how miserable it is for kids who are not in IB). As for a singular test that is worth 70%, I think it is unreliable and really risky to place that much emphasis on one test for a class. Things like bad days, stress, lack of sleep (haha), play a really large role, and if it happens that the day the test is slated to be taken you are miserable and not at your full capacity, you may score as well as you would have at your full potential. That's why I am so against testing- in a sense, it is a hit or miss standard of education.
  3. Jerry

    Plagiarism.

    You should never take someone else's work, regardless if it is or is not public domain. Simply because it reduces how much you get out of your studies. For example, if you were to write an essay on the issues of discrimination, you would not learn as much from your intended research if you simply copied- even if you could get away with it. In regards to your dilemma, I would cite the public domain article as a source, as well as in-text citations. It appears very professional, and it avoids trouble, as turnitin may pull up the source that you are not citing, and you may be docked for plagiarism. At my school, one instance of plagiarism and you lose your candidacy. Not worth the risk!!
  4. I was told by my coordinator that there is a rubric for the IB Biology EE, well, all EEs in general, specific to the subject. I wanted to do write a Biology EE, but after a little scouring of the IBO website and other sources, I found little credible sources. Does anyone have any idea of an official Biology EE rubric and guidelines sheet?
  5. Jerry

    Exam Stress

    The first thing you need to know is, do not stay up and study. You end up not retaining anything and then you lose the ability to figure questions out because your mind is all confused and tired. Just study for a reasonable time, with breaks in between say, every 30 min- 1 hour. I typically read over my notes and then make quizlets of them. It forces you to review the material and then get into the specifics when making flashcards. It works really well for me! Try it. I like quizlet better than paper flashcards because I do not particularly like hand cramps when I try and write them out fast. Here's an example of one that I did recently: https://quizlet.com/109777328/ap-biology-ch17-from-gene-to-protein-flash-cards/
  6. Jerry

    Restarting IB

    A year is not "very behind on your life" lol. I had 2 gap years, I'm 3 years older than most of my uni friends and I'm still alive. I don't know anyone who has restarted the IB, only know people who came back to school after a few years and took extra subjects because they decided on a major career change (usually going into med school), for which they don't have qualifications. I'd say talk to your IBC about why you'd want to restart the IB, they might be able to help with whatever problem you have. And if your exams are actually May 2017, I'd say you could still change subjects and catch up. Sorry, may be a personal preference, I always want to be doing something, and gaps make me uncomfortable. Haha, may have been more subjective than I had thought
  7. Jerry

    History v Chem HL, risk of friends

    If Chemistry is what you want to take, I would say do what you like and transfer schools if it does not mess up the rest of your IB courses (as the new school may not have matching courses). If you don't have to move or anything, maybe you can still ask the kids who you talk to now to hang out, or start a study group with them outside of school. Either way, if you moved to the new school, I'm sure you'll find new friends, because the IB programme sets it up so you're with the same group of kids every single day (at least that's how it is here). Consider all the group projects that require collaboration! Whether they like it or not, someone is going to have to notice and talk to you, haha. You'll be fine, the decision is really simple if you are really that passionate about Chemistry. Who knows, maybe you will find a dream job in that field.
  8. Hey, don't fret. If your AP classes are weighed the same as your IB courses at your school, your credentials will be close to the same. (At my school, both IB and AP courses are weighted at a 5.0). Many colleges take AP classes more seriously than IB courses anyways, especially in North America. You don't have to over load yourself with too many extracurriculars, maybe a few volunteering areas and a sport. (I have been doing so even with IB, so it's not too big of a deal since you honestly should have had been doing extracurriculars to make yourself look good anyways). Make sure you get enough sleep!!!! Believe me, you much rather a healthy life than a health-destructive life just for "academic achievement." I'm sorry your parents forced you out, best of luck though!
  9. Jerry

    Relationships with other IBers

    I'm so sorry, but that and the Donald Duck profile picture made me laugh aloud. But in regards to relations, like everyone has said, the IB programme creates an environment where everyone is close to each other and friendly. It just simply happens naturally within a "segregated" academic group where everyone sees each other for 3-4 years. You just have to be careful not to become overly competitive with your peers, because that will cause tensions and ruin those happy friendly relationships (trust me, I know). In regards to romantic relationships, my girlfriend and I have been together since Pre-IB, and it's been a solid relationship with little effect on our grades.
  10. Jerry

    Is it appropriate for your IB Coordinator to do this?

    I agree if you still need another opinion, the IB Coordinator's comment is really unprofessional. As long as your friend is meeting the requirements for the program, she is more than capable of it. The coordinator's opinion is pointless and void, and can even verge on the topic of bullying or harassment if he continues on with it. Best of luck to both yourself and your friend!
  11. Jerry

    An IB friend?

    Would be kind of like international pen pals. Sounds like a cool idea. I'm totally up for it if a group wants to get together. I really enjoy learning about different cultures, so it'll be a fun learning experience!
  12. Jerry

    Offer- holders 2016

    You guys are all so inspiring, I'm really happy for you guys!
  13. Maybe create groups? Some sort of private denomination within the forums where only people in the group can access their group's thread?
  14. Jerry

    So... About my post-ib. Just winging.

    I'm not entirely sure what the point of the post was, but I hope you can take something out of it and try and work on not procrastinating as hard.
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