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ShivaniVino

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ShivaniVino last won the day on March 3 2016

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    May 2016
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  1. I don't think dentistry can be used in a Physics IA. Maybe talk about braces and something to do with resolution of vectors? Also, look into the blue light thing that dentists use to help dry the glue used to stick braces on teeth fastr and what effect it has on the rate of drying, and compare that to light of different frequncies or intensities maybe. I doubt that's a good idea though. Try to pick topics with Mechanics or Thermal Physics. They are the easiest
  2. Stick to the criteria. Be creative with your ways of data collection/processing
  3. I'd suggest you pick Astrophysics, or Communnications since the math involved in it is pretty simple, and the rest is theory that can easily be understood. I strongly reccommend that you do not pick Relativity or Quantum physics. Hope this helps
  4. I guess this is only applicable for metal springs, in which case the metal is probably less rigid due to increase in temperature. Perhaps the following explanation I found on answers.com would help: "A metal will melt if heated to a high enough temperature. Metal atoms are bonded together in a solid metal by forces that are derived from the difference in charge between a metal ion and an electron. In metals, rather than the particles that make them up being atoms, the atoms themselves split into positive ions and free negative electrons that are free to move between the metal ions. This is why metals are good conductors - the electrical charge can easily flow because of the free electrons that carry it. When a metal is heated, the ions that make up the metal vibrate more and more as the temperature increases. There comes a time when the amount of energy given to the metal is enough that the energy of vibration is more than that which holds the ions together, and so the ions too become free moving as the bonds between them break."
  5. Yes, but it is usually not preferred by moderators as there is hardly any scope of addressing uncertainties etc. If you think about it, simulations are merely confirmations of pre-existing coded mathematical relationships based n experiments already conducted. So everything there is already done. You are allowed to, but try to make it as distinguishable as possible. Perhaps this link would help: http://vle.nlcsjeju....t checklist.pdf To answer the question about whether we are supposed to explore something that has never been done before, no, that's a common misconception. What is required is for you to pick something quite common and explore it from a different angle. Take any concept and list out the variables in it, pick two at random that are seemingly not related to each other and try to hypothesise why they would be. One of the easiest ways would be to perform experiments to confirm something using a different method. For instance, you can confirm the exponential decay of the height of rebound of a bouncing ball by using a sound detector and calculating height for each bounce using equations of motion (I found this IA online). Although the hypothesis is based on something that is already confirmed, a different method has been used. Just remember to stick to the criteria after choosing a topic simple yet interesting. If you are choosing to go with simulations, I'd suggest something to do with Mechanics or Thermal physics in Physics and Equilibrium or Molecular bonds etc in Chemistry. Good luck
  6. I am doing Physics HL, and to be honest, I think its way too simple. This is the kind of prescribed practical a year 1 student does when doing core Mechanics. Perhaps you could explore a little further into Thermal Physics. That's one topic with a lot of scope for research.
  7. You can calculate the distance each wave needs to travel to reach point P using trigonometry. Then, divide that by wavelength to find the no. of cycles taken to get there. The no. of cycles of the 2 sources will differ by a multiple of 0.5, meaning the path difference a multiple of half of wavelength, which results in destructive interference.
  8. You can definitely manage as long as you are genuinely interested in the subject. It is true that it covers the very basics, but there are a couple of mathematical derivations in the HL chapters that require some prerequisite knowledge of algebra. So as long as you're covered there, you're fine Do try to start going through a couple of textbooks and take a look at the derivations if you feel uncertain. It would be advisable to stick to the IB Physics HL guide and cover everything mentioned in it.
  9. The thing is, my IA is 12 pages with 1.0 line spacing and 14-15 pages with 1.5 :/
  10. Does anyone know whether 1.5 spacing is mandatory for my Physics IA?
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