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Physics Tutor

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    May 2017
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  1. IB Physics exams are approaching! I started working on a new series of videos aimed at helping you guys to prepare: 1st episode: IB Physics Exam Preparation - Waves - Double slit and diffraction gratings. Watch the video, then after a couple of minutes, the text of a past-paper-inspired exercise will appear on the screen: pause and try to work it out. You can also print the description if you want a written form. When you are done, watch the rest (the detailed correction) and check if you got the exercise right! Good luck with your studies!
  2. See it like a game. The more you practice, the more you see underlying patterns. It's not only about the knowledge in science. As kw suggests, there are 'styles' of questions, you need to identify them. In addition, there is a 'way' to read the text of the questions. That is also something you need to figure by yourself. Just train on a good bunch of past papers, and you'll get the hang of it.
  3. Just to let you know guys, that I finished producing and posted a video which is actually the first episode of the Atomic Physics series (Ep 02 and 03 had already been posted). IB Physics - Atomic Physics Ep. 01 - "Energies in an Atom" This one is a useful one to brush up on the concept of energy (Kinetic, potential, Mechanical, Internal). This is detailed in the first part of the video. part 2 applies this concept to the atom and shows how to find the energy of an atom based on that of its constituents. (More advanced stuff, for HL, will be posted soon in Episode 4) Enjoy!
  4. @Amit Gelbhart I started checking out the options to advise my students (I am a private tutor). Astrophysics seems interesting and accessible, but requires a little imagination Relativity, fascinating but conceptually heavy and with tough calculus, Engineering, interesting and diverse, but a lot ground covered (much to remember) Imaging, accessible but boring (We share that point of view!). I advise usually to go for Astrophysics, especially for those with imagination (it helps!). Remember that you are the one in front of the paper at the exam, not the teacher or the other students. I do not think anything prevents you from choosing your option of choice independently from your teacher's choice...
  5. There are quite a few concepts that are useful in the astrophysics option. Knowing them will facilitate understanding certain ideas in other areas of physics. For example, Wien's law gives the relationship between peak wavelength emitted by a black body and its temperature. your body is at 37C, so you actually are emitting Infra Red light (examples of applications: night goggles, animals hunting at night like snakes see this radiation...). To my grand disappointment, in the new program, they removed one of the main cornerstones of physics: Thermodynamics. Astrophysics does give you a glimpse of it (applied to celestial body.) The concept of intensity (W/m2) is heavily used in astrophysics and is essential in acoustics, medical physics, waves, environmental sciences etc... Understanding star spectras is a great introduction to spectral analysis (atomic physics, chemistry) Besides, it's also super interesting :-)!
  6. You can directly download a pdf with all specimen papers here (SL + HL): http://tuhsphysics.ttsd.k12.or.us/IBDocs/SpecimenPapers2016.pdf The students I have in IB and passing the exams this year are all SL, so this morning I did the SL paper 2. Please note a mistake in the Markscheme: Question 1.d: As you all know, the volume of a cylinder is pi x r2 x h (r is radius, h is height). They gave internal diameter in the text (3.5m) but used that value as a radius in the Markscheme, leading to a factor 4 error in the final result (The number of molecules in the cylinder is 2.7 x 1023 instead of 1.1 x 1024...) As a side note: Many of my students make this rooky mistake of reading the text too fast and injecting the diameter instead of radius in formulas. Keep an eye on these mini-traps that punctuate IB papers guys! Even markschemes fall for them sometimes lol!
  7. Be careful @Haitham Wahid, u and MeV/c2 are not (binding) energy units, these are mass units. (Binding) energies are usually expressed in MeV (or MeV per nucleon). For example when you calculate a mass defect, you end up with (Delta)m = xxx u, that you can convert to MeV/c2 by multiplying by 931.5. When you give your final answer for the energy, you use the same number but just remove the "/c2" from the unit.
  8. Vioh is correct, yet I prefer a more straightforward way to think about this (remember you do not have much time for each question at the exam). Energy is conserved in the circuit, so if 9000+1800J are dissipated, that means 10800 J have been provided by the cell. The emf is energy provided by the cell to the circuit per unit charge (EMF=W/Q), so 10800/450 = 24V. Answer D
  9. Hi IBdoingnothing, Yes, each topic series will have a video dedicated to exercises closely inspired by past paper problems and selected because they are tricky!. For example, in my first series (circular motion), I made a 25-minute study session where we solve together three paper 2 type of problems! It's interactive, so take your pen and paper, and give it a shot! please give me feedback so I can make the next videos better! https://youtu.be/-6HV4NVYWtg Exercise 1: mechanics, conservation of energy and circular motion. A ball slides down a slope and enters a loop... Exercise 2: Mechanics and circular motion. A mass is swirled vertically. Minimum speed required to keep the string holding the mass straight ? Exercise 3: Friction and circular motion. calculating the maximal angular velocity of a rotating disc so that an object placed on it does not get ejected from the surface of the rotating disc.
  10. Hello Moma, Thank you for your comment. Yes, that's the plan! I will cover HL topics too. Actually, about motion in fields, there is already an exercise out there within the context of circular motion (charge moving in a magnetic field). https://youtu.be/DVp6VJvwjl8?t=11m22s Be well, and good luck with your studies!
  11. Dear IB Students, I am a Tutor in Physics (IB and A-Levels). Being very booked these past few months, I was not able to respond positively to all requests for help. So, I decided to create an educational YT channel that everyone could use to refine difficult concepts and train on exam exercises. It is still in its infancy, with only one series (Circular motion) completed, and one in preparation (Atomic Physics – a couple of videos are online, more to come). It will most certainly be a yearlong project before I cover everything, so any feedback from you guys in these early stages would be very useful, it will allow me to create even better free lessons for the community. Check the channel here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDuKjUhIhctf7NDGOjgg89A And feel free to subscribe to be notified of the videos I post, which will always be very relevant to your studies of Physics!
  12. Dear IB Students, I am a Tutor in Physics (IB and A-Levels). Being very booked these past few months, I was not able to respond positively to all requests for help. So, I decided to create an educational YT channel that everyone could use to refine difficult concepts and train on exam exercises. It is still in its infancy, with only one series (Circular motion) completed, and one in preparation (Atomic Physics – a couple of videos are online, more to come). It will most certainly be a yearlong project before I cover everything, so any feedback from you guys in these early stages would be very useful, it will allow me to create even better free lessons for the community. Check the channel here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDuKjUhIhctf7NDGOjgg89A And feel free to subscribe to be notified of the videos I post, which will always be very relevant to your studies of Physics!
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