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IBS09

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  • Exams
    May 2009
  • Country
    United States
  1. First of all, welcome to IB! Going through it may be tough but in the end, as a recent graduate, I felt it was worth every bit of effort I put in. Going to your teachers and asking is definitely a wise choice- you can't worry about saving face when your grades are at stake. Each teacher has his or her own grading style, especially on essays. If you can tailor each essay to how your teachers like it, it will definitely help your grade. Second, try searching the web for tips on studying. Not all studying methods are created equal, and sometimes the habits that work for your friends may not work for you. It's not only about how much you study- HOW you study is also very important (and underrated!). It's really great to see that you have so much passion for doing IB! If you work hard and efficiently, you will succeed in your tests.
  2. I don't know if this qualifies as "best", but... In my school, we always have two weeks of school left after IB tests where we do basically nothing but watch DVDs. On the last day of school, while all my other classes were watching happy happy joy joy style animation movies like Walle, my TOK teacher made us watch "Munich", a horribly depressing movie about an Israeli hit squad avenging the Olympic athletes killed in Munich 1972 Olympics. Also, we had a banquet for IB class of '09. A group of students performed a skit of all the IB subject stereotypes that was hilarious, but my favorite part was when a student and the same TOK teacher did a Chinese opera sing-off. Easily the hardest I ever laughed.
  3. In World Lit essays, you always want to tie your argument to the authors' use of literary techniques. The essay topic can go a long way with that. Currently, your topic of "How do the writers present Hanna and Meursault as outsiders in the novels...?" may be too vague English-wise. I think that a better topic would be "How do the writers use such-and-such literary device to present Hanna and Meursault as outsiders in the novels...?" You know, mood, voice, metaphors, symbols, whatever works. Also try to weave the techniques into your descriptions. The graders are looking for an awareness of the "art of the author", as my teacher put it, or how an author uses his or her own style and combination of literary techniques to narrate the story and make it a classic. Give them what they want.
  4. Hanging out consists of you and your friends complaining about your latest test/IA/CAS activity. You study in bed and sleep on your desk.
  5. Banned for not coming up with a witty retort
  6. Maybe IB's idea of a "global citizen" is not as literal as you think. Their goal is probably to make the student aware of points of view outside that of his or her cultural/national/religious worldview, and therefore promote tolerance of all people across the globe. However, while IB does teach you more about the perspectives of other cultures than my AP classes, that really isn't the focus of IB classes. So we learn a bit more about development in Economics or try to look at WW1 from the Austrians' point of view; it really isn't that big of a deal. IB advertises this because of recruitment purposes or whatever; I don't know. My definition of a global citizen is simply one who tries to look at events without a strong national bias and goes beyond the "my country is the best" mindset of most people (especially us Americans. Sigh.). For example, eastern countries like Russia and China has a stronger emphasis on social harmony than on individual rights, unlike Western countries. So the "global citizen" takes that into account when judging China on it's latest human rights violation. Even though I am Chinese American, I don't condone some of the steps the Chinese gov't takes when dealing with protests and dissent. But maybe the global citizen thinks twice before assuming that all Chinese people want democracy.
  7. While I think a bill ultimately needs to be passed, it is best to wait a month or two longer to hammer out the details. Even the general outline of the bill is currently unclear (for instance, is there going to be a public option?), so no one can really form a final opinion yet. However, I do think a bill needs to be passed to combat rising premiums for health insurance and start to close the gap for the 45 million uninsured in America. Congress needs to figure out all the causes of inefficiency in the current health care system and address those problems. To name a few, I can think of high medical malpractice costs, unnecessary tests by doctors caused by the "pay-by-quantity" payment system, and denial of coverage due to pre-existing conditions. Given the current, highly partisan political environment in the health care debate, the health care plan should emphasize controlling costs and eliminating unjust insurance practices rather than universal health care, which I'm not too sure can be achieved now given the recession, wars, and US debt. Remember, Vietnam and 70's stagflation sunk the LBJ plan for a "Great Society" of liberal government. Obama needs to make sure the recession and Afghanistan doesn't do the same to his ambitions. Maybe he should hold off gov't health care for the masses until we have less on our plate.
  8. Banned for commenting about EE before you have actually done it. You will learn, young one.
  9. You seem to have missed this link: http://www.thedailyshow.com/watch/wed-july-1-2009/osama-bin-laden-needs-to-attack-america Yep. A guest on Fox News advocating an attack on America. And the host agreeing with him. I'm pretty sure that gets you arrested in most countries.
  10. Very well noted. In fact, there are 3 (three!) churches next to my (newly) former PUBLIC high school, and a majority of my classmates, even in a public high school, are religious. Religion and politics tend to mix very much in the US. In fact, in a discussion about the 2008 election, one of my teachers (I think my TOK teacher) predicted that there will NEVER be a non-Christian President of the United States. In addition, since education in the US is controlled at the state level, some religious states such as Texas routinely try to insert creationism into science textbooks. So, at least in this case, the stereotype matches well with the truth. Which brings me to this question: do you think the negative correlation between intellectualism and religious faith is diminished or even eliminated in more religious countries such as the US? If that's the case, maybe the root of this link lies in cultural memes, rather than an inherent conflict between reason and faith.
  11. The woodchuck would chuck however much wood Chuck Norris could chuck at the woodchuck if Chuck would chuck wood at the woodchuck. In other words, an infinite amount. If you had the power to eliminate one requirement of IB, what would it be?
  12. Banned for comparing the heinous act of food destruction to TOK instead of something more evil, like the EE.
  13. Ok. Assuming your daddy doesn't have a $10 million donation on hand, you're going to have to get in the hard way. Here's the general consensus on how the Ivies do their admissions: 1. They look at your SATs, GPA, and rigor of schedule in the context of your school (you need to take the hardest courses offered). They automatically reject anyone who doesn't come close to their usual averages for admitted students. For example, if you have a 2000 on your SATs and Harvard's average last year was 2250, you're pretty much rejected outright. About half of the students are rejected this way. 2. They look at your other qualifications, like extracurriculars, essays, and extraordinary talents- officially. Unofficially, they also look at race and legacy (or at least those with only, say, a $1 million endowment- see above). If you have the grades, scores and some other extraordinary ability (I call it the "how the f*** did you do that?" category), like starting your own business, national competitions, and research, among others, you're most likely in.
  14. Don't forget legacy admissions. Especially for a certain former US president.
  15. Specialized IB schools who don't have to simultaneously take AP exams, I imagine, do better. Not having to bow to the state's every bureaucratic whim helps too. I go (went) to a public HS in California, so when we talk about the low 30's, we're referring to average class size. IDK our school's average score, since it is never reported, but I'm guessing it's around 30.
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