Lord of the Pickles

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About Lord of the Pickles

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    May 2018
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  1. Structure depends a little bit on the subject you're taking, but in most cases, you should define key terms then talk about the arguments and counter arguments. The "thesis" is usually really short. Definitely definitely definitely DEFINITELY consider both sides of an argument, having a balanced argument is in the rubric of almost every IB subject that includes short answer. Don't worry about "weakening" your point by considering both sides. Having a balanced argument is more important than trying to prove a point.
  2. Unlike MYP, pre-IB is not an official part of the IB. All of your requirements are local requirements and they differ from region to region, so you would have to ask your school about examinations, requirements, etc.. It is entirely possible to teach yourself a subject. There are tons of articles, videos, practice problems, etc. that are just a Google search away. See if you can get your hands on a textbook since the bulk of your lessons probably come from there. It just takes a little bit of dedication and discipline, don't let one teacher ruin your whole career. Good luck
  3. In my experience, this is not true. I have heard plenty of explanations that it increases grade boundaries and can therefore make the course harder for non-native speakers. However, I don't think the IB has any written rules against enrolling in language B/ab initio. Just by looking on the internet I've heard of people enrolling in language B/ab initio in a language they're fluent in to get easy marks. Even in my own school (keep in mind, a bilingual country) where a lot of people have done bilingual programs since the beginning of elementary school do language B for their second language.I think these rules are probably for individual schools and not from IB. So, @UnknownStudent, I don't think IB has anything against enrolling in language B but you'd have to obey your school's rules anyway. If you aren't able to convince your school to let your enroll in lang B French your only option would unfortunately be ab initio or transferring to another school that might let you do it.
  4. I can't remember my exact question and I don't feel like digging it up lol but I think was looking at whether a company's practices were ethical. I used some legal documents and some company policies. I think I used it to see how its official practices compared against the law. Everything else I did was pretty ugly, and I admit, I did only OK on this IA, so I know a bit on what NOT to do. They still haunt me to this day lol. My question was shallow despite exploring the same topic as you, and I used some very weak sources to try and show the general population's opinion (not the policies or legal stuff), when I should have looked at a bigger picture instead of a couple of biased sources. I can't remember much else off the top of my head but I remember using weak sources made me lose a lot of marks, and being a bit overdependent on sources made me lose analysis marks. Instead of balancing my points I turned completely towards my crappy sources as a measure of how ethical a company's practices were. So legal sources can potentially be a good measure of ethics (although you should try not to assume that legal=ethical), as well as company policies or any hard proof of what companies do and try to achieve (instead of looking at a single promotion, ad, etc.). Probably the biggest challenge will be an effective way of measuring a region's moral view on topics.
  5. I did something similar for my business IA, and my teacher approved of it. I think your question is perfectly valid and has a lot of potential, but there are some things I would watch out for. 1) Personal bias. I can see why this is unsettling you a bit since the EE guide says it should be unbiased, and you really need to watch out for this when you do your essay. Try to take into consideration other people's opinions rather than your own since ethics is defined as a moral code within a culture, region, etc. To try and minimize the impact of this you need to have balanced arguments (discuss ideas for and against your point). 2) Bias from your sources. Try and pick secondary sources that have very little bias and use facts to support their claims. I use https://mediabiasfactcheck.com/ to verify what type of bias my sources use. In most cases you'd choose sources that are left-centre, least biased, right-centre, and pro-science. However since you're dealing with a topic that includes a lot of biases, I would just use least biased and pro-science sources (sometimes the slightly biased sources if they cite sources and don't use loaded language). Good luck with your EE
  6. I think it depends on your subject choices. For me personally it was only slightly harder than grade 10 pre-IB, and the only really difficult subjects I had throughout the year were math HL (which I dropped because of mediocre grades) and English Lang and Lit (I just straight up suck at language). You will definitely have to put in some effort if you want good grades though. It's not like previous years where some subjects you can sit by with no work and end up with a 90+ average. The most stressful parts of grade 11 for me were the assignments with long deadlines (extended essay, IAs, etc.) since you need to manage your time effectively and try not to convince yourself that you have "plenty of time" since your deadlines can often be months away. I think what matters most are your study habits. If you develop good study habits you will be fine no matter how tough your subject selection is.
  7. In your applications you should mention your struggles and how you overcame or coped with them. Do not overlook your financial struggles in your applications just because they are a problem that doesn't originate from your academic life. If I remember correctly, there was someone (can't remember their name) who made it into Harvard with a very low GPA (<2 I think) because they had to support their family and had to prioritize their 2 jobs over school. Their struggles showed that they were resilient, determined, prioritized appropriate tasks, and could handle the university workload. I don't know the specifics of your situation but just from reading this I can tell that you are spending your very limited resources towards your extra curriculars/academics, which shows your determination to go to uni. Good luck applying, and good luck with your situation
  8. I know a few people who ran a YouTube channel for their CAS project. Their channel had lessons, exam tips, and maybe even a couple songs for one subject (can't remember which one though). However, it always depends whether your IB coordinator approves of the idea or not.
  9. The only business related extra curricular that I know of is DECA, and it's worth it. It counts for CAS and looks great on resumes and university applications. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DECA_(organization)
  10. Your 40 volunteer hours will not count towards CAS. Your school will push you finish your 40 volunteer hours in grade 9 and 10 because of this reason, they are separate requirements. You must finish your OSSD hours before you start getting CAS hours. It is not mandatory to finish your OSSD hours by the end of grade 10, but I don't recommend putting it off since then you would have to do both CAS and OSSD hours in grade 11 and 12. You really don't need to worry about CAS at this point since in most places you would have to wait until the beginning of grade 11 (September for you) to even start. Just focus on your OSSD hours and you will be all set for now.
  11. Your SLs are not a big deal. Your HLs however require a lot of commitment. Math HL will probably be your most difficult subject, and you will need to do homework or review every night. If you think your math skills aren't very good or you don't like math, don't take it. Latin HL's difficulty will depend on how much practice you've had with the language. If you can speak full sentences, you should be fine. If you are new to the language or if you barely know a few words, you will have a hard time. This goes for most HL language B subjects. HL English A is not too difficult. If you are doing Literature the most difficult thing is probably keeping up with all the books you will need to read. If you're doing Lang and Lit the workload isn't too bad. I'd recommend that you get your SLs out of the way in grade 11 so you don't forget things over the summer. You will forget parts of your HL courses over the summer since most of them occur over the course of 3 semesters, so it's better to forget little bits of HL courses rather than both SL and HL courses. Also, TOK is only one semester. Hope this helps
  12. You obviously need secondary data. Primary data is not required but it is often recommended and can help your case. One of the most common forms of primary data in bus&man EEs are interviews to collect information that isn't accessible on the internet, which can suit your needs well! I'm not very good at giving feedback on questions though, so here's a useful doc for anyone that needs help framing a business IA/EE question: https://bissbusiness.wikispaces.com/file/view/IA_Question+how+to.doc
  13. 1. The difference between physics SL and HL is the one that I'm the least certain about. SL is mostly applying formulas and using basic concepts. HL is the same with more complex concepts. I have heard that SL is quite a bit easier since HL physics compares to HL math (one of the hardest IB courses if not THE hardest) in difficulty for some students. 2. The beginning of chemistry HL is identical to all of SL. Some schools even put SL students with HL students at the beginning. HL gets difficult after the common part it shares with SL, which is also around the time that HL students start taking things a little too lightly then get shocked at the increase in difficulty, lol. The HL part is just going back to the SL part with 1000x more detail. 3. Biology is mostly memorization. HL is pretty similar to SL, except you will have to memorize more. If you like math, I'd recommend physics. If you prefer memorisation, I'd recommend biology. If you want to go to university in the US I'd recommend doing chemistry along with the other science you prefer. As you said yourself, biology and physics is a bit of a weird combination, especially from a university's point of view. The vast majority of students who do two group 4 subjects do chemistry along with either biology or physics. If you still really really want to do biology and physics, go for it. It's all up to you, just go with what you like best. Hope this helps
  14. You will have to do some impromptu for your language B. That is what your oral evaluation will be on. For SL, you will see 2 images then you will have to pick one, prepare for a couple of minutes, then talk about it for a little bit. The speech doesn't need to cover any sort of formal structure, it just has to touch on a few key points. You will have plenty of practice orals. It's not really difficult in my opinion. As for lit vs lang and lit, I'm not sure about difficulty. From what I've heard, it's roughly the same difficulty, it's just that lit has a much higher workload. You will be assigned over 10 books over the whole course I believe. In lang and lit you will be assigned around 5 since you focus on media as well as literature.
  15. I don't know exactly what is required to get into classical studies, but you should definitely check out what is required. This is probably my most important piece of advice to you, since doing the wrong courses can ruin your chances of getting in. About the difficulty, you should be fine for your HL courses. Except maybe HL French, which I would discourage unless you have taken French courses in the past. As for your SL courses, seeing the fact that you are doing math studies, I think chemistry would be a better choice in my opinion. Chemistry is much lighter on the mathematical side of things, and the course itself isn't too hard. It's a combination of basic math with a little bit of memorisation. Physics SL wasn't particularly difficult for me but I can see why people would find it difficult if math isn't their strength.