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Befuddled

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Befuddled last won the day on September 28 2017

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    May 2018
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  1. There's definitely been a time when we all wanted what someone else took for granted/could easily get for themselves. And then we get mad for not having it ourselves. After which we might think of even more underprivileged people than us who couldn't have what we do. Let it be materialistic, happiness, ability, or something else. But is it wrong to console ourselves by thinking of people who have even less? Isn't it after all just a variant of a sadistic nature? Making ourselves feel happy because others are incapable? To extend this to the extreme, is sadism a part of human nature? What do you guys think?
  2. This is a very challenging time for you, but trust me, don't take a hasty decision. First and foremost, focus on IB now. Medicine is great, but comes with lots of responsibilities and pressures - cliché but true. I don't know if you really want to do medicine yourself, but definitely don't push yourself into something you're doing out of a need to please others. But if you're having serious second thoughts about medicine, careers in genetics are especially intriguing as you say so yourself The biological field is vast, and there are definitely cross-overs. You wouldn't have to 'work under' someone. If I'm wrong there, and medicine is your own desire; good job! And as @kw0573said, there's lots of time to improve your grade. Use websites like msjchem, the study guide, talk to your teacher and friends, explain your situation to your teacher, ask for after-school help, join amazing forums and whatsapp groups. You can definitely improve.
  3. I agree with Lixter. One of the strongest parts of a good essay is the plan. If it isn't fairly strong, your whole writing will struggle to take an analytical form. With the literary techniques, definitely look up the effect on the reader - with that, study the mark scheme and bear the criteria in mind. You should have knowledge and mention literary devices, but don't feel compelled to awkwardly throw in as many as you know. Take it easy. There's no prize for mentioning 5 or 10 or 30 devices
  4. Haha, I'll take that as a compliment Right, of course it's better to feel emotions and know you are capable to relate to others and empathise. That's part of us being humans. However, my issue revolved around it being so overpowering that you weren't able to handle it and did something you shouldn't have. I guess, the real argument here should be amended to: How can we determine the capability of a person to handle literature like that? Age? Some young ones are more mature than most. Culture/Education level/Attitudes to topics? Whoa! That's discrimination! And then there's the whole thing about free speech and rights, if we withhold it from people we're determining them to be incapable in a way. But if we do allow literature to be freely spread, we're back to the same situation of literature potentially harming you/others. It's an endless loop: ethics.
  5. Hey guys, I'm trying to convert the amount of Mg2+ ions in MgSO4 (molar mass:120) to ppm. This is a little confusing to get my head around. I wish to convert 0.5 moles/litre Mg2+ ions (12 grams per litre) to ppm. This is quite urgent. Thanks in advance for your help!
  6. Some of my tips for analysing poetry/prose: 1. Identify the message/purpose. Usually it will have a theme/topic like love/violence, pain/happiness, peace/death, etc. Look them up online if you like. 2. Now find obvious sentences/phrases/words that relate to the theme. Shakespeare says "Thous eternal summer shall not fade" summer is associated with a sense of calm and beauty. That's a positive message, the rest of the poem tells you it's topic is love. 3. Also look for imagery and actually imagine them in your head to see how it make you feel, and what you think of. A poem about depression could describe the depth of something/ sinking into the oblivion, etc. 3. Next, look for sounds. Violent topics use sharp and hard sounding words such as kick, shock, pinch, etc, etc. 4. You can follow some mnemonics like FLIRT (form, language, imagery, rhythm and rhyme, theme and tone). To develop your point, describe the impact created by what you have analysed. For example, after establishing how an image shows hatred, say how it links to the rest of the text and what the reader feels. These are some of the things I do. Hope it helped!
  7. Hey there chemists! I am doing an esterification reaction for my IA, and in order to determine Kc, I need to find out how much unreacted acid was left over. I would like to avoid the lengthy process of washing and purifying the ester (Christmas soon, little time!) and using that as a determinant. The carboxylic acid and alcohol are the ones left over then. Do you know how I could isolate the acid or the alcohol, to find out its concentration? Thanks a billion!
  8. Ahh... but books you physically keep. A movie's on disk. So shouldn't the emotions stay with you? Whenever you touch the page, smell the book, read a word, the emotions and memories seep through. *To be seen through a lyrical point of view.*
  9. Hey guys, I recently found out my old IA's method wouldn't work.... So I thought of a few ideas, one of which was perhaps using Biochemical Oxygen Demand as a Bio IA. The worry is that there will be too much chemical analysis rather than dealing with organic material. Another idea was to study yeast activity with altering amounts of salt. I know yeast is studied a lot, and also that it is too simplistic: I will just be varying salt and measuring CO2 released. I need some suggestions. Thankss
  10. Reading The Handmaid's Tale and especially The Road, I must admit, I was overpowered by the despair and hopelessness depicted in them. It kind of got to me as well. Has a book ever gotten to you so much that you feel hopeless? So, is literature, and its power, a harm to society if it will inflict/drive you to take detrimental actions (like, depression or suicide for example?) What do you think?
  11. Hey guys, So for my IA, I'd like to determine the effect of boiling on iron content in spinach. I'm faced with two problems. Namely, it's a very experimental investigation, and I doubt I can get literature values. I was told comparing with lit values should be done, is this a problem for me? (I WILL, however, be using the Beer-Lambert law....) The other thing is, if I choose to analyse the leaves themselves, and not the resultant water after boiling, I will need ethanol* to break the cell walls. Will this interfere with hydroxylamine hydrochloride and ortho-phenanthroline? *Check: I could just blender the leaves right? Thanks so much!!!
  12. That's strange! My teacher specifically wanted us to use in-class texts Shows you how open the IB is in terms of assessment
  13. Hey, The FOA is an activity which is based off work you do in class. Normally, your teacher will have given you texts during the topic that you study and brainstorm upon. These are the texts you use for the FOA's base. However, some people have also added other material like posters/images alongside the above texts. So, to answer your question, you can definitely use adverts. Make sure it was done in class if it is the central text. Then, you are free to reference and allude to any other media item.
  14. Befuddled

    Oxford medicine

    I received 8A* at iGCSE and have applied to Oxford. The fact that most applicants for ug med did upto 15 GCSEs and got 10A* on average is plaguing me. My school fixed 7 subjects per students so I couldn't take more GCSEs. I'm an international applicant so my chances are already pretty low for an offer. Unsure if the 9 GCSEs in total compared to 14 will be a downer?
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