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NotAProcrastinator

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    May 2020
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    Turkey

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  1. Hi, I have started the first year of the IB Diploma Programme. I am taking Language A at SL, Language B at HL, philosophy at SL (I have no other choice, but so far all my grades were around 7), Turkey in the Twentieth Century (this is an SL only course only for Turkish students), Physics HL and Maths HL. I think physics HL and maths HL are quite a lot when taken together (It's not like I am bad at them, my score is generally better than most of my classmates, but I do not know how I would fare in an actual, IB style exam, since ,n my school we try to learn both the IB curriculum and the national curriculum.), but they seem to be unnecessary for someone who wants to go into philosophy in the future. I wanted to drop physics HL and take Turkish A HL instead, but I learnt that ability in physics and maths is a strong predictor of philosophical analysis skills. With that in mind, do you think I should switch? I will contact admissions offices of Yale, Stanford, Princeton, Brown, Amherst etc. as well.
  2. I am planning to take my Extended Essay online from Pamoja. I also take philosophy SL from Pamoja and am quite successful (my grade for the first term is 7). I mainly want to ask people who have taken an Extended Essay with Pamoja before about how it works. How was your supervisor? How was the programme as a whole? What are the challenges you faced and what benefits are there to taking the Pamoja extended essay course?
  3. Hello, I wanted to ask for your evaluation of the online programs of Pamoja, specifically those on philosophy and economics. What are its strengths and weaknesses; how supportive are the teachers; what are the additional important things that you can tell me? I am a pre-IB student planning to take these courses online, even though I am not so sure of taking economics. Anything will be helpful. Thanks
  4. Hello all, I am Pre-IB student looking for options to take Economics either SL or HL in DP. My school does not offer these courses, so I wish to take them online. I already decided that I am going to take Philosopy SL online due to my passion for the subject, but I am unsure of Economics. How is the learning environment in Pamoja online courses? What are its strengths and weaknesses in terms of its ability to foster academic development? Especially, what is the degree to which the teachers are supportive? Less importantly, are there any other online courses? I heard of the Elite in London, but I know little of them. Thank you very much in advance
  5. Hi, I am a pre-IB student planning to go on to do a philosophy major. I do not know what subjects I am going to take, however, I have got the following outline in mind: English B HL (I think I could have done A2 as a second language, however, it is not offered in my school) Maths HL (Inspired by Bertrand Russell on this one) Turkish A1 HL/Physics HL/Economics HL (I am pretty much in turmoil) Philosophy SL (If I could take it HL, I would, however, it is not offered in my school and IB Online only has philosophy in SL Physics SL Turkish A1 SL (If I take one of last two in HL, I am going to replace the one I took with either chemistry or economics SL) Now, you may be all over the place as I am. That is why I shall be explaining this peculiar choice. In Turkey, no matter what we do, the national curriculum imposes upon us near-HL-level workload on chemistry, biology and physics. If I take any one of these lessons -except physics HL, which I think can be useful for understanding the philosophy of science and the point to which modern physics has come from a philosophical point of view- it is solely to reduce my workload. I do not think I will even so much as glance towards the national curriculum if our normal exams in school are not in that style -probably they are not, though I have to ask that. If our exams are just on what we learn in the IB, then I will probably choose the following courses: Hi, I am a pre-IB student planning to go on to do a philosophy major. I do not know what subjects I am going to take, however, I have got the following outline in mind: English B HL Maths HL Turkish A1 HL/Physics HL/Economics HL (Turmoil continues) Philosophy SL Physics SL/Economics SL Turkish A1 SL/Economics SL Let me add that if I take economics, I will be taking it online just like I did philosophy. Now, here are my main questions, but all advice is welcome: 1. Will physics SL or HL help me to achieve my objective (i.e. understanding how Newton invented the concept of mass and from that the philosophical foundation of Newtonian physics in general)? 2. What can be the contribution of economics to my study of philosophy? The only thing that I can think of is that some great philosophers after the 19th century (Karl Marx comes to one's mind but John Stuart Mill counts as well) were economists, and I believe that only a basic comprehension of economic principles can support my learning in university on these topics. 3. Can Maths HL have any contribution? You know, maths being an important source of knowledge from Plato in the antiquity to Spinoza and Descartes and modern attempts to rederive the whole of maths on the basis of logic are pretty strong reasons for me to take maths HL. Plus, I am very good at maths; the natural curriculum sucks and the only thing we do is to memorise long theorems in advanced Euclidean geometry, but even in that I could prove by myself many of the theorems we studied. 4. Can Turkish A1 HL have a contribution? Well, let me be pretty straight-forward in here: New Criticism and close inspection of the text to derive meaning is horrible, and I am certain I am not going to ever read a novel in that way. However, literary criticism seems to have strong ties with philosophy, especially with Derrida and his deconstructionism, and Lacan and his "philosophical psychoanalysis" and I try to create my own independent way of looking at literary texts, one that I feel is more meaningful. In view of all this and also considering that the skills that are necessary for writing a well-structured, coherent essay are crucial in all fields, doubtlessly so in philosophy -unless you are Nietzsche, but I digress- I think that Turkish A1 HL might be a good choice. Thank you all for your response and for sticking with me until the end of this very long post. Bonus question: Do you know a way in which I can take English A2 as a second language? I passed FCE with distinction, which means that my English proficiency level is C1, and I think I can very well go beyond the curriculum of English B. I spent the last year studying English B from the Cambridge textbook and it was like having a leisure ride- I had zero difficulties.
  6. I wonder if you have ever felt like me, but right now I feel like I am dabbling on the floor with life getting sucked out of me. Our teacher chose a collection of particularly symbolist, post-modern stories for detailed study and tasked us with studying it in the summer. It is so symbolic that it takes hours only to read thirty pages, and honestly, I have begun to question all this literary analysis enterprise and its purpose. I wonder if any of you found a way out of creating a totalising system of meaning within a literary text or employ the same methods as me.
  7. Hello guys, I am new both to this blog and to the IB. There is something that troubles me a lot these days on literary criticism exams that we will sit. Can we apply the principles of critical theory in our commentary, or is it not encouraged? In our class, there are not a lot of people who know critical theory and our teacher seems to encourage an in-depth examination of the literary text at hand in which we are simply building meaning from the text, as a critic with a New Critical approach would do, and as far as I know such an attitude is encouraged in normal US high schools as well. However, I do not wish to engage in such banal and aloof interpretation and wish to use and experiment with other theories, such as feminist critical theory, Marxist critical theory or even deconstruction. Daring to go further, I wish to postulate my own way of interpreting literary texts. I do not know if there is an official, IB-approved literature book discussing such matters- in fact, I know for certain that there is none for Turkish A1, which I am taking as my Language A1 course. What are your experiences concerning literary analysis? Were you allowed to engage in more complex sorts of criticism, or even tried to have the text play against itself in a deconstructionist sense? What did the examiners think?
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