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shreyam1312

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shreyam1312 last won the day on November 10

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    May 2020
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  1. My teacher did say it is appropriate to use secondary data in some cases where it is impossible to collect primary data on your own (climate change, for example). So you CAN use secondary data in your IA as long as you analyse it correctly and draw your own conclusions. However, if your teacher doesn't approve of it you should probably explain to them what you intend to do clearly or try to find a different topic.
  2. Of course it's possible, as you know, there is an EVS spectrum with a variety of EVSses that sort of fall in between (environmental managers, soft ecologist, etc.). You could add this as a challenge you faced while reflecting, or maybe add more categories of EVSses (from what it sounds like you are doing), where you categorise people according to soft ecologist, environmental managers, ecocentric, etc. Show evidence that you were prompted to add more categories, and it will show how you developed your method. Good luck!
  3. There's an application in economics called the Gini coefficient - there is basically a curve called the Lorenz Curve and a line called line of equality in a square plane (look it up for an image, which would be clearer). For the Gini coefficient, find the area under the line of equality (should look like a triangle). Then find the area between the Lorenz Curve and the line. Divide the second are by the first and the answer is the Gini coefficient. I'd warn you that the math is kind of hard, there's no 'equation' as such for the Lorenz Curve so you will have to go into another method. That's one application, though! Hope it helps and look up the diagram to get a better picture of it.
  4. I've started my Math SL IA (finally) after not being able to find a topic for months, whatever I found I either didn't understand, was too simple, or my teacher said there was too little math in it. Currently, I'm working on an IA on the Tower of Hanoi, which happens to also be in an IB sample IA. I'm using the same aim and methods in the sample, but I am planning to cite the sample in my references and use my own words and personal engagement. I told my teacher about the similarity to the sample and she approved my topic, but I'm worried I'm plagiarising and will be penalised for it. Is this plagiarism or can I just continue with what I'm doing?
  5. I hate them too, it's annoying. But my teacher won't shut up about making us put in footnotes (references), and in fact one of my teachers (an examiner) said someone lost a diploma for missing one(1) footnote reference. Better to put it in for safety, I guess? Just start footnoting from when you start writing itself, then you won't find yourself making up access dates for websites later Good luck!
  6. If you've written historical essays, it's quite similar to that. For example, with a "To what extent" question, you would support with some arguments, and counter with some more. It's just the same with the extended essay, except it's - well - extended. Go into detail about the support and counters you are providing, and detail on your conclusion. Where your conclusion in your papers would be just about a paragraph, it might be a page for the EE, considering that your arguments are detailed and long. Try to plan out the arguments that support and counter your research question - make bullet points as you would plan out a normal historical essay. Otherwise, it might be easy to write the introduction first. My supervisor told us to do it like this: 1. Make an interesting opening (quote, etc.) 2. BRIEFLY introduce the topic (the event, leader, etc. that you are concerned with) 3. Discuss why your topic is controversial - basically what's the debate about it (are there many causes? effects? do historians debate it?) and lead on to why you were interested in it 4. State your research question 5. Talk about the focus and methods - how you collected your data, what sources did you use, etc. 6. Give a more detailed background information if there is anything further you want to introduce about the topic. Hope this helps and good luck!
  7. The Cambridge Textbook on the Spanish Civil War is pretty good. We used it to study about it. It really details the causes, so it might help you! I've attached it below: Spanish_Civil_War_Source_2.pdf
  8. I've started my Math SL IA (finally) after not being able to find a topic for months, whatever I found I either didn't understand, was too simple, or my teacher said there was too little math in it. Currently, I'm working on an IA on the Tower of Hanoi, which happens to also be in an IB sample IA. I'm using the same aim and methods in the sample, but I am planning to cite the sample in my references and use my own words and personal engagement. I told my teacher about the similarity to the sample and she approved my topic, but I'm worried I'm plagiarising and will be penalised for it. Is this plagiarism or can I just continue with what I'm doing?
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