notenoughsleep

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About notenoughsleep

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Exams
    May 2012
  • Country
    Canada
  1. 9gag all the waay!
  2. A girl in my school just got into Waterloo and was told she just needs to maintain 30 points. Given your 7 in math, I'd think you have a shot in Waterloo Maths
  3. I think you can get into UBC no sweat. The others will be pretty tough. But yeah, I think UBC is the best option for you anyway
  4. SFU is probably your best choice. Science and Business programs are competitive at most universities.
  5. I think one thing we have to start off accepting is that it's completely normal and innate to be grossed out by homosexual activity. It's not homophobic or discriminatory to be grossed out by homosexual sex--I would never want to watch gay porn. However, we don't have to be exposed to this by accepting homosexuality in our lives. In regards to the legal system, legalize it and let it be. They should be allowed to do whatever they want within their own homes. If they're having sex out on the street, that's a different story--but that shouldn't even be legal for straight people right? I think the biggest issue comes up when we see two homosexuals kissing in a public place--to be honest, I find it disturbing, but no I'm not a homophobic discriminatory person, I really do believe it's my innate instinct to react this way. Many people go against homosexuality on religious grounds, but I really don't think God will condemn you if you simply don't advocate nor oppose it. Jesus told his disciples to preach the word in every town, and if they were unwilling to accept it, to dust their feet and move on. If you're a disciple of the christian church, you should then too do the same and just leave it if society is not willing to accept your personal beliefs. As long as you yourself don't engage in homosexuality, you won't be damned for all of eternity. Scientifically, there's as much science proving that homosexuality is nurtured as there is proving it's innate. We should examine this more, it IS worth it, we can't simply say "let me them be and let's focus on something else"--that's a very ignorant perspective. As a society relying on science, we must examine everything and provide answers for everything. If homosexuality turns out to be a disorder (which I personally think it is), then a "cure" may be developed. No, a "cure", should not be forced on people but be available to people. For example, I have a friend who is mormon who has told me he is having homosexual thoughts, but does not want these because of his religion. I think he's bisexual though, but he wishes these thoughts would stop, even though he does not plan on pursuing a homosexual lifestyle. Wouldn't it be appropriate for him to take this "cure" if he wanted to? As far as adopting children for homosexual couples--they should be allowed to as long as they go under the same guidelines as a straight couple. As long as it's a good home, and all, a child would be much happier there than an orphanage. In conclusion: Whatever they do in the discreteness of their own home is fine, but don't parade it around (straight people don't parade it around either). I believe in more power to individual states to decide what they want--under this compromise, homosexuals can move to states where it is legal. Yes, this sounds like "no, YOU have to move", but it applies to straight people as well. For those who don't want to be in a society like this, they can move to a state where it is illegal and where it is more suitable for them. Ultimately, I think a solution should be developed in the middle to satisfy both advocates and those who don't support gay marriage or homosexuality in general.
  6. does this cover tuition only or...? Yeah, tuition only. An admissions officer told me that every year there's a certain number of IB points designated, and everyone who achieved this score or higher automatically gets a full scholarship. He said they were in the high 30's and I think that it had been 38 or 39 the previous year. However, when I went to visit the downtown campus in the summer and had a meeting with the main admissions lady there, she told me that that it can also be in the 40s. As far as residences go, I looked into this, but have found almost no information. I think this is mainly because they are limited and the only time their fees are waived is for financial aid and usually just for Canadian citizens.
  7. It's going to be VERY difficult for you to get a FULL scholarship to any top 500 schools in the US and Canada with those grades. A big part of it because you're not a national citizen, and another because they're nothing too impressive. If you pull of at least a 36, you'd have a chance of pulling off a scholarship for some smaller ones (U of Calgary is the only one that comes to mind). I just remembered you mentioned the SAT, you need to take the SAT for most American universities, but none for Canada. NONE, trust me on this one. In terms of Canadian universities, you can get a full scholarship to U of Toronto with 39-42 points.
  8. Timmoty. I'm not sure how the medicine programs work in Poland, but in Canada and the US you must first complete an undergraduate degree before you can enter medical school for an MD. You mentioned UBC does not accept international students, that is incorrect. UBC does not accept international students for it's medical school, but you are not applying to its medical school, you are applying for an undergraduate degree--where they do accept international school. Please excuse me if you already have an undergraduate degree, but I'm just assuming you're still in high school since your IB exam dates are set for May 2012. I'd recommend Canada since we have an affordable price range and some great science programs and medical schools you can later go into. Let me make this clear once again: You CANNOT go into medical school right out of high school in the US and Canada. You must first complete an undergraduate degree. Stop looking at the information of medical schools and look at the science programs of American or Canadian universities. For scholarships and admissions, UBC is your best choice. They love IB students and I've never heard of anyone getting rejected from there (it's very easy). You could also just try going into a smaller Canadian university, completing your undergrad degree there and then doing medical school in some other university. Other than UBC, you should consider the University of Alberta or the University of Calgary. I know that you should be able to get a scholarship for Calgary very easily if you have good grades (38+). If you have grades lower than 36, it'll be difficult for you to get a scholarship--especially since you're not a Canadian citizen.
  9. Last year, in my IB Economics SL 1-year class we were only 3--and one girl skipped half the time so it was just me and this korean kid most of the time.
  10. Ever consider doing a foreign exchange? Most international schools offer the IB program and have superb reputations. These schools aren't nearly as picky as the private schools in the US and Canada (we had a new kid come in and miss the first semester IB, but they helped him catch up)--but if you're getting low marks or you're a bad influence, they will impose consequences. Personally, I would recommend doing an exchange to a foreign country (non-english speaking) for three reasons: 1. The education is fantastic: Since these are all private schools, you get some very good teachers who are easy to work with and have a positive attitude. 2. The environment: Most students at these schools take their academics very seriously and are hard working. You'll have a hard time finding "bad influences" because the people you're surrounded by promote hard work and academic success. Even if they score low grades, they're the ones studying the hardest. The environment can really change your mindset and promote study for yourself. Especially in a non-english speaking country, the international school community is like a "bubble", so it's hard to get any bad influences from even people outside the school. At parties, it's usually just people from the school too--but it depends, in one international school I was at, I did not ever meet a single person from outside my school at any of the parties I went to, but at another, there are quite a few. 3. The international experience: It's great to be able to travel to a new country and meet new people and a new culture. It's something fun to do before going of to university for four years. Two years is probably the best time for getting to know a new place to the best extent. Give it a thought, some of those boarding schools in Canada and the US are good, but I think that you'd have a much more enjoyable IB experience being in a different country and discovering a new culture.
  11. Oh great. Thanks for the information! Good luck with your applications btw! I was wondering, what is your college preference? Do you have insider info on this issue too? Yes! The colleges don't matter in regards to what your studying. You can be in any college and still study the same thing and be in the same classes as someone in another college. Colleges are more like "homerooms" in high school--they're small communities where you belong and spend your time in. If you're worried about choosing them because of academics--don't, it doesn't make a difference. I'd just choose them depending on what you're looking for. Take a look at the webpages of the colleges and their pictures, they should help you decide. I chose mine just based on the pictures--although I regret it now because I realize I may be living in them, I had originally planned on getting my own place. 1. University College 2. Trinity College 3. Victoria College 4. Woodsworth College 5. St. Michaels College 6. New College 7. Innes College I chose these because I like modern buildings with a good social environment. However, I also liked antique buildings with interesting architecture (note I used the word "antique" and not "old"). Are you planning on living on campus? Yes, I've already spent hours and hours on the websites of the colleges and my final list is: Trinity College University College Innis College Victoria College St. Mike's New College Woodsworth College I will probably be living on campus for the whole 4 years (I believe it is possible, especially for international students, right?). If not, then I will stay on campus for my first year because I can't imagine moving to such a huge city (it has double the population of my hometown!) all alone, trying to find an apartment How about you? By the way, what's up with the student profile that Trinity requires its students to submit? I chose Trinity as my first choice because I've read (almost everywhere!) that it has an excellent academic reputation, but UC has definitely drawn my attention too My parents are pretty wealthy so we were considering buying my a condo by harbourfront (beside the CN tower); we were in contact with some people already, but then through an agent we learned that those buildings were of very poor quality, so our months of research went to waste. From there, we decided it'd be best to make a decision after seeing the properties in person first--so I'll live on campus for at least the first year, and then maybe buy myself a place. Toronto isn't such a big city when you get used to it I've heard that a lot of partying doesn't take place on campus, so for me, the college or residence doesn't matter as much since I guess I'll be doing my partying off-campus. Hence, my first choice for residence would be Chestnut Residence, since it's a bit separated from the university and is very hotel-like (weekly cleaning service, and all that). However, the one thing I don't like about it is that first and 2nd year students have to share a 2 bed-bedroom with absolutely no privacy. Although they get their own washroom, it's like any hotel room with the beds side by side, and one or two desks--just one room. I'll have to find a roommate I really like! Not too sure, but more information should come along in "late november" when applications start being processed. Yeah, I've read about Trinity too, so it must be a good college. Acedemically--it's not relevant. I've done a LOT of research about U of T so if you have any more questions just inbox me Let me know if you get in too! It'd be great to know someone who's also new ! Oh that's great! I'll probably send you more questions since you have obviously done a LOT more research than I have Good luck with all of your applications and if (hopefully!) we both get in, I'll definitely contact you! I know nothing about Toronto (and generally Canada!) so I'll need some guidance See you around! No problem! I lived in Canada for 10 years, and in the Toronto area for 5. It'd be great to go into university knowing someone else
  12. This question is VERY relative! There is no yes or no answer--or well, there is, but it depends on your school. At my old school, the IB kids get a lot of homework every night, so they have a lot of stress on their hands. However, at my new school, we don't get ANY homework whatsoever (my school's philosophy) other than the Internal Assessments. As a result, I'm usually free and maintain a good social life. I think I've only had about four weekends where I've been stressed to the bone and have had to work non-stop. I can usually find time to go out with friends and do things I enjoy. My friends from Canada tell me a different story, where they have to complete assignments everyday in order to maintain a solid grade. My grades in my school are just based on the practice exams and IAs we do, so there's really little stress if any. I'm a bit stressed right now because I have the following assignments due on monday: World Lit Essay Biology Lab Chemistry Lab TOK Essay As you can see, they are all IA, and no useless worksheets.
  13. Oh great. Thanks for the information! Good luck with your applications btw! I was wondering, what is your college preference? Do you have insider info on this issue too? Yes! The colleges don't matter in regards to what your studying. You can be in any college and still study the same thing and be in the same classes as someone in another college. Colleges are more like "homerooms" in high school--they're small communities where you belong and spend your time in. If you're worried about choosing them because of academics--don't, it doesn't make a difference. I'd just choose them depending on what you're looking for. Take a look at the webpages of the colleges and their pictures, they should help you decide. I chose mine just based on the pictures--although I regret it now because I realize I may be living in them, I had originally planned on getting my own place. 1. University College 2. Trinity College 3. Victoria College 4. Woodsworth College 5. St. Michaels College 6. New College 7. Innes College I chose these because I like modern buildings with a good social environment. However, I also liked antique buildings with interesting architecture (note I used the word "antique" and not "old"). Are you planning on living on campus? Yes, I've already spent hours and hours on the websites of the colleges and my final list is: Trinity College University College Innis College Victoria College St. Mike's New College Woodsworth College I will probably be living on campus for the whole 4 years (I believe it is possible, especially for international students, right?). If not, then I will stay on campus for my first year because I can't imagine moving to such a huge city (it has double the population of my hometown!) all alone, trying to find an apartment How about you? By the way, what's up with the student profile that Trinity requires its students to submit? I chose Trinity as my first choice because I've read (almost everywhere!) that it has an excellent academic reputation, but UC has definitely drawn my attention too My parents are pretty wealthy so we were considering buying my a condo by harbourfront (beside the CN tower); we were in contact with some people already, but then through an agent we learned that those buildings were of very poor quality, so our months of research went to waste. From there, we decided it'd be best to make a decision after seeing the properties in person first--so I'll live on campus for at least the first year, and then maybe buy myself a place. Toronto isn't such a big city when you get used to it I've heard that a lot of partying doesn't take place on campus, so for me, the college or residence doesn't matter as much since I guess I'll be doing my partying off-campus. Hence, my first choice for residence would be Chestnut Residence, since it's a bit separated from the university and is very hotel-like (weekly cleaning service, and all that). However, the one thing I don't like about it is that first and 2nd year students have to share a 2 bed-bedroom with absolutely no privacy. Although they get their own washroom, it's like any hotel room with the beds side by side, and one or two desks--just one room. I'll have to find a roommate I really like! Not too sure, but more information should come along in "late november" when applications start being processed. Yeah, I've read about Trinity too, so it must be a good college. Acedemically--it's not relevant. I've done a LOT of research about U of T so if you have any more questions just inbox me Let me know if you get in too! It'd be great to know someone who's also new !
  14. I too have come to question marriage. I feel as if it isn't the same as it used to be and has lost much of its meaning. However, there are various legal reasons to continue marriage--especially if the husband or wife decides to desert the spouse and a child. About your statement regarding the importance of a ring, I agree, but if its so insignificant why does it matter if one is given anyway? I believe that marriage should be maintained for two reasons: 1. Legal reasons--guarantee safety and security from a relationship. 2. Freedoms--many religions appraise it, who are we to tell them right or wrong? I'm a libertarian, let people do what they want, if we don't like it then we shouldn't do it and let's leave it at that. It's a sort of ritual, and there's nothing wrong with culture. It's like celebrating a birthday, celebrating a unity within two people should not be frowned upon. If they want to do it, let them do it. I think I went a little off-topic, but I think that the necessity of marriage depends on the two people. I want to "marry" a woman because it represents a much more stronger bond, and a decision that we made to be together forever--or at least try to be. Also, it's much harder to walk away from marriages than relationships--this is important when considering children.
  15. Oh great. Thanks for the information! Good luck with your applications btw! I was wondering, what is your college preference? Do you have insider info on this issue too? Yes! The colleges don't matter in regards to what your studying. You can be in any college and still study the same thing and be in the same classes as someone in another college. Colleges are more like "homerooms" in high school--they're small communities where you belong and spend your time in. If you're worried about choosing them because of academics--don't, it doesn't make a difference. I'd just choose them depending on what you're looking for. Take a look at the webpages of the colleges and their pictures, they should help you decide. I chose mine just based on the pictures--although I regret it now because I realize I may be living in them, I had originally planned on getting my own place. 1. University College 2. Trinity College 3. Victoria College 4. Woodsworth College 5. St. Michaels College 6. New College 7. Innes College I chose these because I like modern buildings with a good social environment. However, I also liked antique buildings with interesting architecture (note I used the word "antique" and not "old"). Are you planning on living on campus?