Jump to content

spaceisland

VIP
  • Content count

    97
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

2 Unknown

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Does your school give you standard provincial curriculum grades as well as IB grades? Every university I spoke with, except for Queen's, said that if you have both a provincial transcript and an I.B. transcript, they'll merely use whichever one is to your greater advantage. So, if your predicted IB scores are looking low, but you have a 90% in the normal system, you'll still be accepted. I know students with scores between 24 and 30 who've been accepted to U of T, Waterloo, and UBC. Kids who have failed the diploma have still gotten into U of A on almost full scholarship. Basically, if your core mark is about 5% above the uni's cut-off, usually around 80%, you will be fine. Canadian school admissions are pretty lax.
  2. Ugh, every other night I have recurring nightmares about English class, probably because that's basically the only course I'm passionate about. In the worst one, I sat down at my desk to right my English final on Life of Pi thinking I'd be good to go, only to read the question: "If a^2+b^2=c, then how much has π suffered?"
  3. I haven't read the other two, but Lord of the Flies has a lot to work with. There are many archetypal characters/character relationships in it, that could be compared in a very interesting way with other literary/film characters, or other well-known figures in society. Plus allegory is fun to talk about!! Most of all, have confidence!!!
  4. I'm jealous of your book choice!! Personally, I'd opt for #1 because although you're going to have to dig a little bit deeper in the novel, that's exactly what the markers want you to do. For the 2nd option, it would be very easy to demonstrate how prominent the themes are, but it seems like the evidence might be so blatant and broad that it will be hard to find a unique angle without repeating yourself, especially since identity loss/appearances vs. reality have been discussed in almost every other book. I think diction and language could get very interesting..To start, I'd recommend finding a few different elements of Alice's character, and then dissecting the text to see how certain variances in the writing, can contribute to her many facets. I'm not sure if that's any help! And I'm a bit biased, as the majority of my own EE was based on text/narrative and how it defined the characters.
  5. I'd stick with English, it seems like the easiest way to score high, plus I found my paper super enjoyable to work on and managed to hack an A. I'd say read as many A grade papers as possible, and notice the commonalities between structure/format etc., plus make sure it's something you're passionate about, because it will a) make the process MUCH easier to endure, and b) it will definitely come through in your writing.
  6. Blahhhhh I only have to finish the last graph, but I have lost the initial data from the first set of girls from 1-20 that is given.... Is there anyone who could possibly help me by sharing this info with me???
  7. Free, but you have to pay $150 for every course you drop... incentive I guess.
  8. ...I certainly hope not. I slept through almost the whole unit on the Russian Revolution.
  9. Ugh, thank-you so much for your reassuring words Elsa! I'm still wandering along doing nothing more than writing a few research notes once and awhile, and I was beginning to panic after talking to all of these keeners who are already on their second drafts! Glad to know I'm not too far behind to catch up.
  10. Material Cultures: GDC, Textbooks, I.B. course guides, internet, large book bags. Sense of self and space: Alone time throughout the day is necessary for regrouping, and most people stick to their own space for class work. Communication and Language Informal English with some four to five syllable words thrown in for dramatic impact. Dress and appearance: Stylish, lots of "librarian chic" style going on. Especially on test days. Class motto: "If we go down, we're going to go down looking good. Food and eating habits: No breakfast, rushed lunches, lots of munching in the evening. Relationships: Very close bonds between students and teachers, tense between students because we're around eachother so often and the classes are so small that we know everyone else's annoying nuances. Values and Norms: Everybody is really competitive and assignments are taken really serious, but week-end evenings are reserved for rowdy let loose time. Beliefs and attitudes: "We're all masochists." Mental processes and learning: Not too shabby, a lot of over analyzing and panicking. Work habits and practices: Lots of procrastination and then heavy duty cram sessions.
  11. It typically varies from school to school, some are more lenient than others. I know that our coordinator let's us count that kind of thing, I use rehearsal time for theatre and singing for most of my hours. You just need to do it in a way that is organized enough for somebody to sign for you.
  12. Personally, I think organized religion is often a bit overrated. I mean there is a lot of good things to be taken out of most religions, but I think there are usually many faults too. I would consider myself a spiritual person, but at the same time, there are so many things regarding Christianity that I disagree with and find entirely hypocrital and unnecessary... I believe that their is some higher power, but I don't know if it is a single God, a general energy force, or if I am entirely wrong! There's no reason to feel bad or crazy about it...
  13. No, some schools recommend that you only write an EE in a subject that you have taken, merely because it is assumed that you will be more successful if you are familiar with the curriculum of a given subject. Others merely demand that you write it in a subject that is offered by that school, but [i]as far as I know[/i], the IBO allows you to write it in any area that is offered in the program, as long as you can find a suitable staff advisor.
  14. Living in Saskatchewan where there is still a foot of snow in some places, all I have to say, is bring it on!
  15. Thanks guys, haha. So I think I might have a potential topic... I've decided on English, and I am thinking of something along the lines of whether or not the classic awe and mystique of ancient Greek mythology is sacrificed, or enhanced through modern renditions, with specific reference to The Penelopiad by Margaret Atwood, and Weight by Jeanette Winterson.... What do you guys think?
×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.