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KLSmash

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KLSmash last won the day on January 9 2010

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  1. Collection of a few of my labs from my SL Physics class. I ended up receiving a 44/48 was which the highest mark out of about 50 - 60 students. If you have any questions about anything relating to IB, feel free to send me a message.
  2. I took SL Chemistry and SL Physics, and found Physics to be much more difficult. Chemistry used barely any math (and when it did, it was simple algebra for the most part), and the concepts were fairly easy in memorizing. Physics, on the other hand, was not so easy.
  3. Go by the rubric, study past papers, read past essays, study ahead of time, practice oral commentaries aloud--in other words, be a good student, haha.
  4. Well, in my WL1, I wrote on the topic of freedom, or lack thereof, in Kafka's The Metamorphosis and Esquivel's Like Water for Chocolate. And after I analyzed it, I also added how the lack of individual freedom in each novel parallels the lack of freedom for individuals in each respective society when each book was written. And so I concluded, how even though the cultural settings of both novels are drastically different, they both manage to identify and highlight critical values of liberation, and both authors effectively comment on it.
  5. And just to provide some specific examples, at the University of Waterloo, an Applied Mathematics major would have the requirements of: - http://ugradcalendar.uwaterloo.ca/page/MATH-Applied-MathematicsWhereas a minor in Applied Mathematics, would have significantly less requirements. It's mainly for those students that are interested in the subject, yet don't want to take a full course load in it, or don't think majoring in it would be as advantageous as it would be in other subjects. Here's the example: - http://ugradcalendar.uwaterloo.ca/page/MATH-Applied-Mathematics-MinorUsually it's chosen by 2nd year, as for 1st year, you have a few required courses and electives to take. But then you begin to specialize as you get further in your studies. Also, I know that for some programs, there is not a minor for it--only major. And if you wish to do a double major, then you'd have to fulfill requirements for both programs. Often times, this will leave you with little to no electives, unless you wish to take more than the standard course load. Even with a major and a minor, you have a bit of electives to work with. There's also something called a joint major, which has a course load intensity less than a major, but a bit more than a minor. You predominantly have to do 2 joint majors, hence the term "joint." And so, if you want some freedom and electives, then rather than doing a double major in [x] and [y], you can do a joint major in [x] and [y] and have a lot more freedom.
  6. I did Discrete Math. I was pleased with the paper, for many of the questions were similar to the past papers. Only a few things I didn't know, but the proofs as always are impossible for me. haha
  7. If you want to do an EE in music, you need substantial music theory knowledge, since your entire paper is basically analysis on a piece (or a series of pieces). How much do you know? I wrote mine on Fryderyk Chopin's Fantaisie in F Minor, Op. 49.
  8. I think I did better on WL1 since I spent more time on it. WL2 was rather rushed, and it wasn't entirely bad, but it definitely was not my best piece of writing.
  9. Define your parameters before writing your essay. By that, I mean define knowledge and progress. Then, make a list of the areas of knowledge, and figure out which ones you can incorporate the best/are contrasting/have good specific examples.
  10. In Math, for our school, we are required to do the option that our school has chosen because now, IB only sends that option, not all 4 for Paper 3. I'm not sure if IB is doing this for all optional papers, as I did Chemistry and Physics last year, and I did options that I studied by myself (Environmental/Drugs & Medicine, and Astrophysics/Nuclear & Quantum). Fortunately we had textbooks that covered all the options, so I just studied from those, and revised heavily on past papers.
  11. I agree with soadquake981. P2 wasn't that hard at all, but there was just a lack of time. When I started, I immediately began on Section B so I wouldn't leave it to the end, and so I ended up not doing 2 Part A questions and most of the Question 14 I think it was on B.
  12. I'm in TZ1, and I chose the prose (Polar Breath). Normally, I choose the poem immediately since I love poetry, and when I first read the prose I thought there was no way I'd be doing it. However, after spending a few minutes on the poem, I realized that I wouldn't be able to write for 2 hours about it, so I immediately switched to prose and never looked back. I mentioned many literary devices: figurative language [including imagery (kinaesthetic {feels her fingers are cold and blue}, visual {ice}, auditory {black dog howling}), diction, metaphor], structure, punctuation, tone, mood, atmosphere, symbolism, setting, etc. I found that the infrequent mention and appearance of birds in the passage represents lack of freedom and motion. Normally, birds are free to fly, and are not trapped; however, the passage begins with them shivering, they try to fly out of the house but hit the window, and as a result, they are used to accentuate the protagonists' lack of freedom. Not only that, but the constant image of vines/wrapping around/spirits wrapping around the house not only creates anxiety and fear within the reader, but also is analogous to how the birds can't fly, and the lack of freedom/mobility in the passage. Also the setting is quiet interesting as it takes place in a rural town (revealed by the distance of her neighbour and the fact he is spreading manure on his garden rows). So in a sense, the setting equally helps reinforce the theme of isolation, separation and lack of freedom. Not to mention, the woman herself is alone (physically within the passage) with her cat. Moreover, I enjoyed the surrealist aspect of the passage and the constant blurring between fantastical and ordinary elements, most notably the spirits. In the first 2 paragraphs, you can find many questions about ordinary objects and everyday life such as the birds, but in the proceeding paragraph, which introduces the supernatural spirits, there's no question and it's all short solid statements forcing the reader to accept as true. Equally, this helps establish an ominous mood and atmosphere in the passage, which is effectively emphasized by the setting. Then, in the 4th paragraph, the author reverts back to writing about ordinary elements; no mention or spirits. However, by the 5th paragraph, it's almost 50% spirits talk/50% ordinary stuff/past memories. So I felt that throughout the first page of the passage, there is obvious juxtaposition in paragraphs, but eventually and inevitably, there occurs an amalgamation of the two (once again going back to the style of surrealism and blurring lines between reality and fantasy). In conclusion, I wrote that it was a very intense yet unsatisfying passage it as it raises more questions than it answers (what's her involvement with the church? where are her kids? how did her husband die?). I wrote 7 sides, no skipping lines. Maybe my best commentary yet. I'm aiming at a 6.
  13. I didn't enjoy it one bit; probably my worst exam ever. I found that their syllabus coverage was poor in the sense that many parts of the syllabus weren't asked at all, where a calculator isn't necessary (complex numbers, binomial, matrices).
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