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Gwib

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  1. To understand something you need to rely on your own experience and culture. Does this mean that it is impossible to have objective knowledge? This TOK Essay got 24 points (B) as marked by the IBO.
  2. This got 19/20 (7) as moderated by the IBO. What impact did the Battle of Stamford Bridge have upon the outcome of the Battle of Hastings?
  3. How does reaction time in the Stroop Effect differ with two levels of linguistic knowledge? This Extended Essay got 24/36 (B) as marked by the IBO.
  4. Rather than 'concentration gradient', I'd say an 'electrochemical gradient' which may be easier to visualise. Since the protons are building up, it's more the change in potential rather than concentration that causes the proton pumping through ATPase
  5. Gwib

    Propaganda issues

    For the MAY 2009 exam, I'm revising 'Causes, Practices and Effects of War' (for paper 2 and 3). For the 'practices' bit, should I go into how propaganda was used as well as like, weaponry and tactics, during the war? Thanks!
  6. Basically, the English exam is an extremely [b]subjective[/b] paper to mark. There isn't a clear-cut right or wrong answer as in Biology, Physics or Chemistry. There is the issue of revision as well. You have to read [b]between the lines[/b] of a poem or prose passage in order to evaluate and understand what the author may have been referring to emotionally or metaphorically. This isn't something you'd need to do much in other subjects, but in English it's all there is. Finally, an English essay is purely hypothetical. You can attempt to analyse passages and make [b]assumptions[/b] based on quotes, but you'll never have hard evidence that what you're writing is correct (see the subjective point above). This, again, isn't a problem in other exams where you have fact to rely on.
  7. Sure! Give me your e-mail in a PM and I'll send you the notes. I'd love to know what you think of them as well.
  8. I've got throughout notes on the Causes of World War One, and I assume that Effects are social, treaties made etc. Does anyone know any good IB sites pertaining to the practices of WWI or WWII? I have nothing on those...
  9. Our teacher has taught us about transamination and deamination for our IB exam (on option H - human physiology) but I can't find any mention of them on the syllabus! Should I just shut up and learn them or not bother, since they're not on the syllabus?
  10. you should really use your textbook. We got Campbell Biology or something, and it's written specifically for the IB diploma. It follows the syllabus and doesn't tell you more or less than what you need to know
  11. work out different values for a, b and n. use wierd numbers, such as 1/9, 0.7 or pi. See if the formula still works for those.
  12. banned for having more than 40 posts
  13. I have to agree with Mr. Shiver. After studying nerves, blood, biology and chemistry in detail, there is too much to have happened by organised chance (i.e. evolution). Chemicals arranged to notify pain, even conscience, is just enormous. How a bat's ear works, how we've evolved a prefrontal cortex, things basically useless etc etc have to show some sort of premeditated design.
  14. my one doesn't make eye contact when he gets angry and it's really annoying
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