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Sonneteer_Trombonist

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Sonneteer_Trombonist last won the day on July 22 2010

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    May 2010
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    Canada
  1. As I understand it, you can choose to take either 3 or 4 HL. I was under the impression that no more than 4 HL is allowed.
  2. I know lots of people who played sports, both competitive and noncompetitive, in IB. Some of the sports combinations were competitive swimming, softball, Taekwando/rugby, curling. One friend played basketball and did track earlier in the year, and handball and rugby later in the year. It's entirely possible. Like Sandwich said, the trick is managing your time and prioritizing. One of my classmates did Taekwando and rugby, and decided to lessen the amount of Taekwando so that she could keep up with full IB. Another classmate was on a junior curling team which made it to nationals, and decided that he was going to do partial rather than full IB because, among other reasons, curling was extremely important to him and he would feel more comfortable sticking with curling alongside the certificate route. That's not to say that you have to make a choice between sports or IB. It might come to that, but as long as you put effort and good time management into your work, then you could make it work.
  3. In my class, we did several labs and the two lab reports with the best marks comprised your internal assessment. The IBO would ask for all of the lab work from certain random individuals in order to moderate our teacher's marking skills, and to prove that we had all done all of the assigned lab hours, but only the best two labs counted for the IA. Also, the first lab usually receives a lower mark than what you want (although 14/18 is a good mark! especially for a first lab!) but once you start doing more labs and get the hang of lab reports and figuring out exactly what the IBO wants, your marks will improve.
  4. I wish I could help you with the Crusades idea, but I have no knowledge of the topic. I strongly advocate doing your IA on something covered in the course so that you have an advantage for IB exams. Maybe you could skim through a second-year student's notes (or a syllabus or past papers?) to find some topics that are covered and see if anything catches your eye. Then browse the internet and do some research on it, and that might help you get a topic, which you can then narrow down into a research question. Good luck
  5. I don't remember much of what my TOK teacher said regarding presentations, but I remember having to relate everything to the different WOK and using different examples of AOK and tying it back. I did mine on how music influences our perception of things (or something like that) and we had to back it up with scientific evidence and use case studies (and, funnily enough, it tied in with my Biology IA so I talked about that) If you look up some of the different case studies regarding legal or illegal drugs, and start thinking about how to tie in the different AOK, then maybe you might find a good way to hone your topic down to a question. Also, there are good tips here: Good luck!
  6. I didn't have to do a CAS project, but I would say start thinking about stuff in any discipline that interests you or makes you passionate. Then maybe start thinking about any way you could involve yourself in that. If there are any organizations that relate to what you want to do, maybe you can research them a little to see how you can mimic them or how you want to be different. Good luck
  7. I'd say just use the standard format for doing bio labs. The Appendix is one of your best friends here, because you can include references to past studies and background information and it doesn't count in your word count. Raw data also goes in an appendix. Your EE coordinator will be a huge help in the formatting process - a classmate did an EE in biology, and she was constantly shifting things around to try and fit the word count.
  8. I'd go with the 84+. You're not even allowed to use a calculator for one of the math exams, no point in getting too attached to it. You can do everything you want the the 84+, and if you get too fancy a calculator you may be tempted to try to learn how to do everything on the calculator, which means you might not learn the concepts properly.
  9. I think the first part has to do with combining like terms. So what might be easiest is to convert all fractions to negative exponents. So 2/x becomes 2x-1 and so forth. Then, see if any terms have the same variables behind it, and add the coefficients. In the second part, you have a lot of denominators. So get rid of the denominators. You have to multiply each term by a common denominator. What you are going to do is look at every single denominator of a particular question, and then multiply each term by the denominators it doesn't have. In essence, this is like multiplying it by all the denominators, and then putting all the denominators on the bottom, and then cancelling with what it already had (does that sort of make sense? I'll do an example at the end). Say for the first question, you have 4/x = (x-6)/(x-4) (sorry if this is the wrong equation, I am assuming brackets here. if the brackets are wrong, at least the steps should sort of be right). So then you want the denominator to be x(x-4) for all terms so you can cancel them out. Well 4/x already has an x on the bottom but it doesn't have (x-4) so then it becomes 4(x-4)/x(x-4) and then (x-6)/(x-4) becomes x(x-6)/x(x-4). So then both the terms have x(x-4) in the denominator so you can cancel. Then you have 4(x-4)=x(x-6). Then you can expand and move all the x terms to one side. Feel free to PM me if you have any questions, I'm not the greatest at putting math into words.
  10. I got the calculus book too, but I like calculus so no harm done
  11. Beethoven is way too dynamic for studying.
  12. Just do it like a regular biology lab, with your problem/research question, hypothesis, background information, experimental design, variables, procedure, data collection, analysis, conclusion and evaluation. If you do labs differently, do them however you do them in class.
  13. Sorry, I don't really understand what you need. If you're asking for specific research regarding your topic, it's probably best to check the library or find some medical journal databases. A library will have access to those.
  14. You can only use gases and aqueous solutions as part of the equilibrium constant equation. The brackets in the equation represent concentrations, and a solid object or a liquid has no concentration. Edit: Just found this video, this guy is pretty good.
  15. I was under for most of it, I don't think there was ever a time when I was over. At the end, I think I was only a few words shy of 4,000.
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