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Aldarion

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    Finland
  1. Here in Oulu, Finland, we had entrance exams and they also took a look at our grades. The total amount of points was 20 from which: -8 points came from your previous school report -2 points from your English teacher's and headmaster's recommendation -10 points from entrance exams In the exams we had -Finnish and English exams both about analysing poetry (if I remember correctly) -Math exam -Natural sciences exam (we had to choose one subject from Physics, Chemistry and Biology) I'm not sure how it is today, but I guess it is quite similar as three years ago. It wasn't too hard to get in, but I guess there were some 100 people and about 50-60 were admitted into the programme.
  2. Yeah yeah, don't worry, I don't take that as too "rude". I fully understand your point of view. I'm just saying that it is possible on some level, BUT it would be extremely extremely hard. It might not be a good idea to do EE on the topic, UNLESS one is absolutely into the topic. I know I wouldn't have done my EE on video games, because that would've just been awful. And I have read the History EE rubric, because I did my EE on History. Also, like most do, I made my EE on the "normal" subjects in history for the simple reasons that I found them more interesting to me AND easier, so you got me there.
  3. Hölökynkölökyn = Cheers (when rising a toast) It just sounds so fun.
  4. Sorry to spoil your fun but, I think that: 1) There are enough sources, if you just know where to look for them. 2) Video games represent history to us and are a popularised picture of them, therefore it is important to investigate th picture they give. And that's just one important issue. 3) Okay. 4) I think this is possible with games and history. Most games are centralised around some theme. 5) You'll just have to write very well. If you can change his/her mind about video games, you've done extremely good job. I'm starting to get more and more intrested about the topic myself, even though I've (luckily) written my EE already.
  5. That actually does help. We had few such meetings with only us history students and we discussed different events. Pros and cons and stuff that supported or opposed some point of view etc. It's useful, for example, when discussing the rise and rule of single-party states-section. Of course you can discuss anything else as well.
  6. So are you doing it only about video games or do you link it to history? Because if you link it to history, you could fit it under history as a subject. For example, take few games related to historical events (eg. WW2 is easy one and strategy games) and discuss how history is presented through them. But if not, you could always link it to psychology (if you study it) and talk about how video games reduce/increase violence etc. etc. Just some suggestions.
  7. I wrote about the characters' struggles against their rules and inflexible justice systems. There I used Chuck Palahniuk's fight Club, that's basicly what the whole book is about, and William Shakespeare's The Tempest concentrating there on Caliban's position and his treachery against Prospero etc. I'm quite happy with it, but I guess it wasn't as good as my mock essay... But we'll see.
  8. Paper 1: I did this one about the Nazi-Soviet Pact. Luckily we had gone through that in detail in our class during our document study so this was pretty easy for me. Altough the evaluation of sources wasn't my best one, but in the essay I was able to bring forth the effects of Japanese invasion in China; for Stalin it would have meant war on two fronts. Also the sources were quite nice. I just loved the cartoon, so funny. Paper 2: In the Rise and Rule of single-party States I answered the question about the contributions of weak and unpopular regimes and overthrowing them. I used Castro (easy one here) and Hitler, where I argued that it was not overthrown, but Hitler used its weakness to gain power within the system itself. In Cold War I wrote about Truman Doctrine and Marshall Plan, pretty easy one. Paper 3: This was just so lovely. My best paper 3 to date and luckily it happened now. We have the 19th century history of Europe. These are the questions I answered: Prussia-Austria rivalry in Germany, Italian unification question and how regionalism and republicanism contributed to it (don't remember last one) and, lastly, the 1848 revolutions. The Prussia-Austria question was served on a gold plate to me, because we've had similar question in our every practice exam and I've already answered that one.
  9. I did. It was just my opinions about poetry and mainly that is why I don't like analysing poetry. Also for some reason poets are quite hard for me, but this one was so easy, 'cause I was able to relate to it so well. The most ironic thing here is that before the exam I had sworn to myself that I wouldn't do my commentary on poetry. But instead I compared a poem telling about poetry to a text telling about poetry. But I was happy how the commentry ended up being. I have small hopes for 6, but we'll see what happens.
  10. Just to contribute to the video games discussion: In my school one of my friends did her EE on the historical accuracy of the Tudors-series compared to real known history. I think it ended up being pretty ok and our history teacher was also satisfied with it. In her EE she claimed that the topic was important to study, because it discussed the popularisation of history and how history might be "twisted" to entertain people more. So in theory you could do it on video games as well, but that might be a lot more difficult than a TV-series. There would probably be much more complications, because in TV-series there's much more background given than in video games and all that. Just my thoughts...
  11. So, how did it go? At least I feel great about every Paper and in Paper 3 I wrote my best essays I've ever written in history. EDIT: Noticed the Exam-section. It was too much down there.
  12. Try live action roleplaying. It's fun as hell and you get loads of creativity.
  13. I'm always wearing black clothes (or occasionally blue jeans), but that's how I always dress, so I don't think that affects that much. But then again, I have a Thor's hammer necklace (I'm more pagan than a Christian ) and a ring that has eagle's head on it. The ring is my lucky charm and every time I start an exam, I give it a kiss. I know, it's extremely cliche and all, but it helps me to calm down. Ps. Seems that I also have a green pen, which has been with me for about 6 years.
  14. No problem at all. I'm always glad to help. Good luck to you all history students for tomorrow's and Wednesday's (in case you're HL) exams!
  15. Here's my advice and hopefully it will help you a bit. In the introduction restate the question and give the main points of your essays. In the case where question asks to "Analyse Hitler's rise to power" you could talk about, eg. his methods and the situation in Germany at that time. If the question asks to give an opinion ("To what extent did Hitler rise to power due to his personal charisma?") state your stance in the introduction. In every paragraph follow this kind of structure (I use it, because our teacher taught it to us): - Topic statement: state the point of view you're going to address in the paragraph. For example, "One important factor to Hitler's rise to power was that the Weimar Republic was unpopular and had little support in Germany." - Then give an example of the issue. "For example, the Weimar Republic was accused of signing the Treaty of Versailles and therefore betraying the people of Germany." - Now explain how the given example contributes to the topic. This is the analysis of your paragraph. "One of the main aims of Nazi ideology and Hitler was overturning the Treaty of Versailles. By proclaiming to the people that he would restore Germany's military might and get the country out of its straightjacket, he was able to gain popular support, which then enabled him to take power in Germany." - To have a good paragraph, you can give further examples. "Furthermore, the Weimar Republic was thought to be inefficient and it was accused of the economic crisis in late 1920s." - And of course with further example, comes further analysis. "By addressing these issues in his speeches and campaigns he started to seem preferable option compared to Weimar Republic. This strengthened his position in politics and in public, allowing him to make his way to the office of Chancellor." So the basic pattern is this. 1) Topic statement 2) Example 3) Analysis of the example 4) Further example 5) Further analysis. Sometimes 4) and 5) are not needed and in comparison questions give example of some other ruler or whatever the question asks you to compare. Remember to direct all your examples and analysis towards the topic statement of your paragraph in a way that it also supports your central idea, ie. your stance about the topic. And also include the "twist" somewhere there. In a questions "Analyse Hitler's rise to power" it isn't that easy, but in "To what extent"-questions go against your main thesis or give another point of view. In your conclusion wrap all your analysis and important events and/or cause to support your thesis, but also remember to include the "twist" here also. So here's my way of doing it and so far it has been very successful format and I hope this helped you.
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