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Hyperbole

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Hyperbole last won the day on August 9 2009

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About Hyperbole

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    Practically Perfect in Every Way - like Mary Poppins!

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  • Gender
    Female
  • Exams
    May 2009
  • Country
    France

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  1. The thing with A1 languages is that you study literature, but in the final exams you have to write essays using an advanced register. So no, it's not okay to be good with the literature part but not use good, varied grammar and vocabulary. As it is expressed in the criteria: use a varied, precise and concise use of grammar structures, idiom and vocabulary. You will struggle a lot with a Language A1 that you aren't completely fluent in, and it's unlikely to do well at all; and if you don't think you can get a good enough grade in English B HL, then how do you suppose you might pass English A1? Also, I doubt that Cambridge would accept a 5 in any subject, be it at HL or SL. Just so you know - make sure of this before you decide anything! Their site has a lot of useful information for prospective applicants. Good luck!
  2. Hyperbole

    Are you autistic?

    Oh wait, what, 39? O.o That seems a bit rash. I do have social anxiety and things, and I'm increasingly unfond of meeting people and getting into spontaneous situations, but ... I really, really don't think I'm anywhere near having Asperger's.
  3. ucas.com is a very helpful site for UK unis. You can search by course and find what universities do them, and then you'll have an easier time finding out how good each of those unis are. UCAS is also where you apply, so it's good to be familiar with the site. =)
  4. I think the last idea sounds like the most interesting one. (Also, the "I actually want to" is one of the most important things to look for - you will be spending a lot of time and effort on your EE, so choose wisely.) I think it could be really good if you focused on how their circumstances are similar, but the two of them are different. (...but I haven't read the novels, so that might not be applicable.) A general suggestion: it's a lot more common, and probably easier, to write a comparative EE. It gives you the opportunity to have a really specific question while still having a lot of material to work with. Good luck! =)
  5. Hyperbole

    7 in maths sl

    I got a seven. I studied a lot. - You have to have good scores on the coursework assignments. I found them very tricky, but I did quite well on them in the end. - You have to understand the material. Make sure you know all the topics; go back and revise them frequently (like before every class test). - You also have to know how to tackle the papers. Do lots of past papers! You should be aware of how much you need to write for each kind of question (short vs. long ones), and how much of your calculations you need to write out (most!). You should also be very familiar with the time allowed; never give yourself more than 1h30 to complete a paper (I'm almost certain that's the time limit... all these rules seem so obscure as soon as you're done with the IB!). Also make sure to not only do the past papers, but also go back with a mark scheme and see where you went wrong and what you need to go over again. You should aim to have enough time to go back over the exam after you're done as well; it may be good to skip questions you don't get so that you can get as many marks as possible on the rest. Then you're more likely to have enough time to go over those hard questions again and understand them better. - Don't rely too much on your calculator, ever, but also know how to use it. You need to be able to get through a paper without a calculator, but there is also a paper where you can't pass without one. And sometimes they're a bit evil - I once got two marks docked off because I couldn't multiply 84 with 8 correctly - I got 674 instead of 672. So the answer is "work hard". I put in quite some effort for maths, and I'm glad I did. In the end I'm one of ten people in my year who got a seven in Maths SL; we were around 45 people doing it. Good luck!
  6. We did "The Great Gatsby", "Great Expectations" and "The Crucible" in one option, and then "Macbeth", "Heart of Darkness" and a selection of war poetry in the second option. We also did Language and Culture, and Media and Culture.
  7. The results of my EUPs were really quick: my Chemistry grade did not change, but my French grade did. I'm so happy about that last one - it's the one subject I really, really cared about. So I will get a second Diploma!
  8. First off, yeah, it's comparatively hard to write an EE in Physics, but it's doable. At my school two EEs gained the maximum score this year, and they were both in Physics. So don't be put off by that if you find your topic interesting! Secondly, no, your choice of subject for the EE probably won't harm your chances to get into uni anywhere: very few equivalent education programmes have something comparable to the EE, so writing one at all is plus points. On the flip side, it might be the extra bonus that gets you into the top schools. My best advice is to pick something you're passionate about. Don't pick a topic that "sounds good" - pick one that you're confident you want to know a lot more about (and can imagine yourself dreaming about without it making you sick, heh). I say go for Physics if you want! Good luck. =)
  9. I just received my component grades (and my Diploma!) yesterday, and found out that I'm ridiculously close to sevens in both French and Chemistry. Now, I'm definitely going to have French remarked, but how likely is it that a science grade is raised? I did Chemistry SL and my points are as follows: Paper 1: 29 (27 for 7) Paper 2: 41 (39 for 7) Paper 3: 26 (26 for 7) Portfolio: 29 (39 for 7; 34 for 6) Total (with scaling factors): 75,67 (77 for 7) It feels quite unfair that I get a 6 just because of my portfolio, especially as I know that they didn't look at mine in particular. They actually only moderated two portfolios from our group; the rest were from the HL groups. Considering that they won't look at Internals when remarking, is it worth it having them look at it? (Also, sorry if this is somehow in the wrong place. I thought keeping all remarking questions in one place would be good.)
  10. Je ne sais pas quel est le niveau du francais en IGCSE, mais je ne pense pas que tu auras des problèmes. Il me semble que tu as déjà un bon niveau à l'écrit, alors si tu continues à travailler pour développer ta langue tout sera bien. Est-ce que tu vas l'étudier au niveau moyen (SL) ou supérieur (HL)?
  11. Yes, I'm entirely completely super sure and positive. Neither footnotes nor the (author, page number, and other useful information) citations are counted in the total number of words. But you need to include all cited works in the bibliography as well, don't forget that!
  12. Hyperbole

    HL vs SL?

    This is kind of difficult to say for sure, because May 2010 is the first year with the new syllabus, and I only have experience with the May 2009 one (yay, I've graduated!), but I'll attempt to help you anyway. At my school History is only offered at HL, because the differences are pretty insignificant but the number of hours is a fair bit more extensive at HL than at SL, so those doing HL generally did better than those at SL back when both levels were offered. I would have taken HL anyway, though. At least in the syllabus where 2009 was the last year, the the papers for P1 and P2 were the same for HL and SL, and the mark schemes were also the same. P3 was only for HL, but the questions weren't exactly harder than those in P2. The IA was worth more at SL (25%) than at HL (20%). Since the most important papers are the same, you gain on being in HL: stuff like historiography and the WHYs become clearer in all topics as you study more events all over. Also, many of the topics are applicable both to P2 and P3, so you get the chance to cover them in more detail; some topics can even be used for all three papers. Still, remember that this is for the old syllabus - there seem to be some pretty significant changes for the new one, so don't make up your mind solely from what I've said. That said, if you like history, go for HL! It's fun, and you learn to write good essays without using a lot of time. History has probably been the only one of my subjects where I haven't had periods of "oh no, don't wanna" in the two IB years.
  13. Just to clear something up. Footnotes and citations NEVER count towards the word limit in an IB assignment! If you do parenthetical citations, then you need to manually count how many words are within those citation parentheses and subtract them from the total number of words. It isn't necessary to do footnote citations for this reason - although I admit it is often easier. Also, there's no need to condense the parenthetical citations as much as possible (except for the clarity issue) because the words don't count anyway. But obviously the words you quote count.
  14. I definitely think you need to narrow your topic down! Maybe you can isolate a certain type of instance where it is used in both plays, or something like that, and then use only those instances? Twisting the RQ would add points both to the RQ criterion and to the depth criterion, so it is definitely a good idea. It does sound like a very interesting EE, though. Good luck with it!
  15. I just have to contradict this: EEs CAN be written in a language other than the three "official" languages if it is written in Groups 1 or 2, that is, if it treats a language. I wrote mine in Swedish, for A1, and received an A and All Was Fine. On topic, I was awarded a Bilingual Diploma. I took the IB in English but had Swedish as my A1 language; I also took English A2. If I had written my EE in French or English I would have fulfilled all of the various ways there are to get one (I think). I don't really know what it's worth, though; many people get it anyway.
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