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dessskris

Enthalpy of Neutralisation

when we are writing lab reports, we would need to compare the actual value that we get from the experiment that we conducted with the theoretical value, right?

some of us might be wondering how to find literature values for enthalpy of neutralisation, especially when Google is not helping. thus, let's share literature values that we have with the sources, so when we need to find it, we can just refer to this thread.

here are some that I know:

HCl and NaOH = -57.9 kJ mol-1

HNO3 and NaOH = -57.6 kJ mol-1

CH3COOH and NaOH = -56.1 kJ mol-1

source:

Hill, G; Holmann, J:

Chemistry in Context

Laboratory manual;

Nelson Thornes: UK 1982, pp 20

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Oh thanks a lot! Just need that for my lab report… :)

However, I wonder if the difference between my calculated value the literature one is too big…what should I do?

I always find the literature values in Google or Wikipedia…don't really know if they are reliable...

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Oh thanks a lot! Just need that for my lab report… :)

However, I wonder if the difference between my calculated value the literature one is too big…what should I do?

I always find the literature values in Google or Wikipedia…don't really know if they are reliable...

If your experimental value (calculated value) and literature value is big then it gives you something to talk about in the evaluation. You know how to calculate percentage error right? ((experimental value-literature value)/literature value) x 100%

Most of the time the literature value can be found on the internet, try different sources to compare them if you can. Otherwise, when writing the lab just cite where you got the literature value from and go with it.

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