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Nowadays, many start to have homeschooling.

Is homeschooling Fullfil all the aim of learning process?

Is it acceptable for you?

Will you do it , if your parent agree?

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I'm not in homeschooling, but I know some people who are/were. Homeschooling CAN fulfill the learning process. Going to a normal school (private/public/whatever) is not for everyone. Some people benefit from having specialized, individual attention. Some people need to be able to go at their own pace, whether it be slower or faster. Sometimes people think a regular school education is not up to their standards, so they choose homeschooling. Or some people have trouble keeping up, so with homeschooling they can go at their own pace and make sure they completely understand something before moving on to the next topic. Other people homeschool because the schools in the area are not adequate. Either the dropout rate is high, the standards are low, the teachers are incompetent, whatever. And then of course, some people choose to homeschool for religious reasons in order to be taught in a way that satisfies their religion (whatever religion they follow).

In homeschooling, you can sometimes choose what you want to study. While it's important that you study mathematics, science, literature, etc. you can focus in on what you want to. I know you can do that at a normal school sometimes, but to each their own. If they like science, they could go to museums often, do science experiments tailored to their interests, etc. If they like languages, they could go to ethnic restaurants, visit areas where the language is commonly spoken, etc. If they like literature they could go to book club meetings, libraries, whatever. I know in my school we rarely go on field trips, so with homeschooling you could go more often and go to whichever place you would like.

Homeschooling is acceptable for me. The only case where I see it hurting the child rather than helping them would be where the parents are teaching hateful things (anti-certain religions/groups of people), teaching the children incorrect things (the world is flat, Hitler was from Russia, etc.) or just not teaching their child at all.

I probably wouldn't want to be homeschooled though, since I like going to a school and meeting people. I'm not saying that you can't do that with homeschooling, but I like the diversity in schools.

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Thank you for the reply, but does the learning process is only to learn maths, science and language. When we go to school we learn much things that would not be in home schooling, like treating people or how to get the knowledge, how to work with groups. School gives an example of community, and gives us a training on how to be a invidual in a community.

For learning process, School creates some sort of competition, which enhance our knowledge. Inside-class discussions increase our ability to reach results.

This is my opinion, other opinions...

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Thank you for the reply, but does the learning process is only to learn maths, science and language. When we go to school we learn much things that would not be in home schooling, like treating people or how to get the knowledge, how to work with groups. School gives an example of community, and gives us a training on how to be a invidual in a community.

For learning process, School creates some sort of competition, which enhance our knowledge. Inside-class discussions increase our ability to reach results.

This is my opinion, other opinions...

Well actually you can learn how to work in groups and be in a community if you're homeschooled. What some people do is that they will get together with other homeschooled people and do activities together. Just because you are homeschooled doesn't mean you are automatically a person with no social skills or know how to work in a group. Also, do you think that just because someone is homeschooled they have no manners, proper etiquette, or are automatically rude/antisocial? I know homeschooled people who are more social and are much nicer than people in a regular school setting.

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I dont know a lot or any homeschooled kids but homeschooling to me doesnt sound appealing. I like my school, I like that there are over 2,000 kids on campus meaning I can meet new people all the time. I like how at public school you can have IB, dance/drill teams, theatre, band, orchestra, clubs etc. I like mingling with friends at school. If i was homeschooled im not quite sure that I would be the same person I am now. Im not saying that Im me because of school, peer pressure and stuff just that I could have been a completely different person. Public school isnt for everyone though, neither is private school or homeschooling. It just depends on you and your needs.

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I had a friend who did home school, well he left half way through IGCSE. He was seriously sharp but his parents wanted him to do home school for some reason unknown till today. But saw him during the my exams. I don't think i would like home school cause there is to much distraction at home.lol

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I think homeschooling for the entire duration of a child's educational years irrevocably and frankly, irresponsibly damages the psychology of a child. You can't teach social interaction, playground dynamics, or puberty.

That said, I would not argue against homeschooling (or un-schooling, w/e) for a child that has grown tired of the educational system. In fact, I agree wholeheartedly with the benefits of the system. I consider myself lucky that I happen to like the vast majority of units that I'm currently studying. Yet, there's still plenty other interests that I'm not developing. Therefore, I don't have a problem with homeschooling in theory, but I could never condone shutting off a child from the social environment of a school for the first quarter of their life.

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That is an important point but I think that school isn't the absolutely only place for social interaction. You meet people in all sorts of places, in sports and dance club, at the library wherever. And I think that family that has such a great desire to play an active role in their child's life to the point where they'd stay home to homeschool their child (on top of other responsibilities) would be the kind of parent to enroll their kid in all sorts of sports and extracurricular lessons. And in homeschooling, the lack of school means a lot of time for the student to pursue their interests in martial arts or art arts where they will probably bump into other like minded people.

I mean you don't get the kind of tragedy-bonding that school gives you, but you can make friends in all sorts of places. You will still have to interact with people, just not in the context of school. Frankly I think that it isn't the worse thing to be away from the cliques and primitive intrigue of public school. Not to mention the fact that any social ability lost is well worth avoiding the individuality crushing industrial machine that is the public school system.

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That is an important point but I think that school isn't the absolutely only place for social interaction. You meet people in all sorts of places, in sports and dance club, at the library wherever. And I think that family that has such a great desire to play an active role in their child's life to the point where they'd stay home to homeschool their child (on top of other responsibilities) would be the kind of parent to enroll their kid in all sorts of sports and extracurricular lessons. And in homeschooling, the lack of school means a lot of time for the student to pursue their interests in martial arts or art arts where they will probably bump into other like minded people.

I mean you don't get the kind of tragedy-bonding that school gives you, but you can make friends in all sorts of places. You will still have to interact with people, just not in the context of school. Frankly I think that it isn't the worse thing to be away from the cliques and primitive intrigue of public school. Not to mention the fact that any social ability lost is well worth avoiding the individuality crushing industrial machine that is the public school system.

No, you're right, you don't have to go to school to learn social interaction. I suppose public education is simply the primary method, and I would still argue that kids who don't ever learn that atmosphere are going to be fundamentally different on some level psychologically with their peers.

As for the "individuality crushing industrial machine"; it only does so if one lets it.

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No, you're right, you don't have to go to school to learn social interaction. I suppose public education is simply the primary method, and I would still argue that kids who don't ever learn that atmosphere are going to be fundamentally different on some level psychologically with their peers.

Agreed with this, people who get homeschooled and therefore avoid bullying, cliques, peer pressure, herd mentality and all those mostly negative things are going to be worse equipped to cope when suddenly they come off the other end and get stuck with an overwhelmingly schooled majority. Petty little things that people have learnt to deal with at school are going to be new, strange and potentially upsetting.

Any form of social underexposure can make 'normal' seem quite frightening when you get to it -- be it homeschooling, single sex education, boarding or whatever. Most people are day pupils in mixed classes going to schools, so their experiences are 'normal' in the sense of majority-rule, and you're at a disadvantage for dealing with them if you've not had them too. You might have similar experiences which allow you to interpret them and then cope fine, but equally likely you're going to be thrown by behaviours other people have learned to thrive with.

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I'm kind of jumping into the conversation, so I haven't seen what everyone has written, I just skimmed through it. But in my personal opinion I think that homeschooling has very beneficial factors, yet it also has negative factors. From what I have observed, the negative factors tend to outweigh the beneficial factors. I have a couple kids that I have know for about 12 years who were homeschooled and started attending high school with me. I realized that they were extremely smart, and the teachers liked them for that, but when it came to socializing: they didn't know how to communicate with people, they would become insulting, too loud, too quiet, arogant, etc. Later, they became this way towards the teacher, and they began to get upset about it and had many conversations with the kids. I realized this was because they hadn't learned regular interaction with people outside of their home. At home they were completely straightforward with each other, but when you go to a public/private school you cannot just walk up to someone and speak your mind. Their attitudes lead to people really disliking them, avoiding them and gossiping about them.

Therefore, I have really come to dislike homeschooling. It just seems that there are so many social factors that school outside of the house offers that children truly need to be able to communicate effectively in the future. It doesn't necessarily have to be school, it just need to be a social environment in which the children can talk, discuss, learn to use their body language and verbal language in a way that expresses their opinion without offending people continuously. My opinion would be, briefly, that home-schooling is good fr sparking your IQ, but very bad for your EQ (which is the intelligence which I believe plays a role in getting you into college, interviews, jobs, volunteer work, life-long friends, etc.)

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Five of my cousins were home-schooled (all part of one family in my overall family lol) and they all turned out fine. They all got into nice universities. -_-

What's different with them is that they got to go to some weird schoolhouse or something, even though they were technically homeschooled.

They also got a lot of social interaction, and weren't cooped up in the cellar all day long. <--lol

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Five of my cousins were home-schooled (all part of one family in my overall family lol) and they all turned out fine. They all got into nice universities. -_-

What's different with them is that they got to go to some weird schoolhouse or something, even though they were technically homeschooled.

They also got a lot of social interaction, and weren't cooped up in the cellar all day long. <--lol

Now that's good. I don't think the real problem lies with the whole "school" part of it, rather: are they getting to social interact or not

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I agree with you there. If a person is denied social interaction with their peers, they would probably grow up to be a lot different.

Lol, I think we found a real life situation for a TOK presentation.

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I agree with you there. If a person is denied social interaction with their peers, they would probably grow up to be a lot different.

Lol, I think we found a real life situation for a TOK presentation.

Indeed we have... :)

Lol... TOK is everywhere :)

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I can only see the positive sides of homeschooling. Really boosting the desire to learn as well as the speed to which you learn. If you have a parent who is willing to do it or have enough money to hire, then I say why not. In fact I wish I could self-study/homeschool during the IB, institutions are not efficient ways of learning.

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I can only see the positive sides of homeschooling. Really boosting the desire to learn as well as the speed to which you learn. If you have a parent who is willing to do it or have enough money to hire, then I say why not. In fact I wish I could self-study/homeschool during the IB, institutions are not efficient ways of learning.

I do agree that homeschooling gives you more knowledge. That it for sure, but it doesn't give enough social knowledge. I think that in the long-run, you need both a good intelligence and good social habits to be able to succeed in life, as opposed to having just a high intelligence. How you interact with people the rest of your life will determine what roads you take in life. The homeschooling, from what i've observed, take away that social intelligence you need in life.

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I could never learn a lesson in my house. That's why I have to go to the library for every major project I have. :)

I get easily distracted. I guess I could have grown into homeschooling, but I couldn't start now.

I do agree that homeschooling allows students to learn at their own pace, instead of being amassed into groups. That's a reason why the NCLB act in America got alot of trouble lol.

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