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Dictionaries in exams for non-native speakers

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Somewhere I read that non-native English speakers are allowed to take dictionaries into the exams. Is this also the case for English A1? I am currently taking English and am struggling with texts due to a missing understanding of words, but my school didn't offer anything else :/

Obviously I wouldn't be allowed to do so in a B language :D

Thanks!

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Somewhere I read that non-native English speakers are allowed to take dictionaries into the exams. Is this also the case for English A1? I am currently taking English and am struggling with texts due to a missing understanding of words, but my school didn't offer anything else :/

Obviously I wouldn't be allowed to do so in a B language :D

Thanks!

You may only bring in a translating dictionary in non-language exams. Please refer to point 4 under 'General' on the 'Conduct of the Examinations: Notice to Candidates' -

I would assume that English A1 is considered a language exam.

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You can't use a dictionary for A1 language or B language exams, but you can use one for any other subject where the exam is not in your best language.

The IB exam conduct says that candidates may bring:

a translating dictionary for non-language examinations (the dictionary

must not contain notes of any kind and is only permitted if the response

language of the examination is not the best language of the candidate;

an electronic dictionary is not permitted)

So since English A1 is a language exam, you cannot use a dictionary, sorry. :(

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Guest Soiboist

Out of curiosity, how would they determine whether the language of examination is the student's best or not? Considering the number of bilingual students in the IB this rule would be rather difficult to actually follow, right?

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Guest Soiboist

I assume via saying that your A1 language will be your best language.

But that would not make sense to a lot of students, not everyone is taking the ordinary combination of A1 and A2. For instance those that take two A1s or A2 and B.

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I assume via saying that your A1 language will be your best language.

But that would not make sense to a lot of students, not everyone is taking the ordinary combination of A1 and A2. For instance those that take two A1s or A2 and B.

You can't take an A2 and a B language, you must take at least one A1 language. Not that many people take two A1 languages. In the case that you do take two A1 languages, then they probably would not let you use a dictionary in either A1 language, since you should speak both languages quite well and you shouldn't need the dictionary. Just my assumption.

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Guest Soiboist

I assume via saying that your A1 language will be your best language.

But that would not make sense to a lot of students, not everyone is taking the ordinary combination of A1 and A2. For instance those that take two A1s or A2 and B.

You can't take an A2 and a B language, you must take at least one A1 language. Not that many people take two A1 languages. In the case that you do take two A1 languages, then they probably would not let you use a dictionary in either A1 language, since you should speak both languages quite well and you shouldn't need the dictionary. Just my assumption.

Alright, that seems reasonable I guess. But in the future students will be able to take courses equivalent to A2 and B together, since Language and Literature can be taken in group 1.

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So for example sake if I was a native Chinese speaker and the Physics HL exam was in English, I would be provided a dictionary. However, for A1 amd A2 exams, no dictionary/conjugation book will be provided.

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What kind of dictionary? Like a spanish-english-spanish dictionary or a normal dictionary? A finnish-english-finnish dictionary at least could give people an unfair advantage. For example if you are asked to define "cerebellum", but have no idea what it means the finnish translation is "pikkuaivot" which literally translated is little brain, so it gives you a clue about what it is. Since it is easier in finnish that would give an unfair advantage. In finnish many of the biology terms are usually not obscure latin names but more literal, so it is easier to guess what they mean. Though maybe the advantage is lost when you have to look through a dictionary which takes up valuable exam time...

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