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I am hoping to get accepted to Harvard as for the medical undergradute programme.

Does anybody know anythign about

- What grades are necessary?

- Other required qualifications?

- The chances of acceptance for a foreign student?

- The significance of a year spent doing something else after IB?

- How the admissions are determined?

Thanks!

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Go to their homepage and check out the entry requirements. As long as your year off school has not been spent on drug dealing or similar, it shouldn't matter what you do. it could even be a merit if you - say for example - have travelled, worked, or taken a language course. Being a foreign student is always good, US universities want a broad spectrum of students, and your chanses of getting scholarships increase (IF you have the grades). I suggest you start by going to their homepage.

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Guest Soiboist

From what I've read it is basically being unique. It might seem unfair but the admissions to the US top schools are lotteries. What people would usually tell you is to achieve very good grades and possess a large amount of extracurriculars portraying leadership abilities. But as there are so many people that apply with this to Harvard, the schools look for other characteristics amongst the students applying. Due to this I wouldn't put so much focus in getting into Harvard only, because you'll only get disappointed one you're not admitted. I would rather advise you to apply to several top schools and some "worse" security choices and not care too much if you don't get into Harvard. I must also ask why you want to study at Harvard specifically? I get the feeling that you're thinking a bit too much about the reputation of the school, because for medicine you'll get employed no matter of the school you have gone to frankly.

I'd say the top schools UK are much more fair when it comes to admitting the best students, because top students are solely what they look for without bothering about ECs and such. You hence might want to look into those as well.

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I'd say the top schools UK are much more fair when it comes to admitting the best students, because top students are solely what they look for without bothering about ECs and such. You hence might want to look into those as well.

^^ Although for very competitive courses and Universities (e.g. Medicine, Law) your extra-curricular activities are really important in the UK too. Everybody gets top grades so extra-curriculars are all they can really use to distinguish students :yes: Work experience, leadership roles, team roles and outside interests/talents are all going to increase your chances.

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But, is there a med undergrad program at any US uni? I think there is only pre-med and med school is a postgraduate thing.

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Guest Soiboist

I'd say the top schools UK are much more fair when it comes to admitting the best students, because top students are solely what they look for without bothering about ECs and such. You hence might want to look into those as well.

^^ Although for very competitive courses and Universities (e.g. Medicine, Law) your extra-curricular activities are really important in the UK too. Everybody gets top grades so extra-curriculars are all they can really use to distinguish students :yes: Work experience, leadership roles, team roles and outside interests/talents are all going to increase your chances.

I believe this is especially true for Medicine, mainly because they might want to see some evidence of that students are truly interested in the course, but I don't think it applies as much to Law. Working experience is rather difficult to obtain for Law, but if a student would get it it would obviously be impressing. I'd still say that your interested of the course and academic capability is the main focus for university admission in the UK; extra-curricular activities surely won't hurt your chances but neither will not having any. There is also a weighty difference with the UK universities' view on ECs compared to their American counter-parts, they actually want them to be relevant to your course whereas schools in the US like anything that just sounds impressive.

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I must also ask why you want to study at Harvard specifically? I get the feeling that you're thinking a bit too much about the reputation of the school, because for medicine you'll get employed no matter of the school you have gone to frankly.

You're right, it is in a way about the reputation. At least it used to be. I've wanted to attend Harvard ever since I was a child, but now I guess it has become more like an obsessive thought. I just wan't to see how far I can come, so I think I ought to take your advice on applying for many different universities.

Do you happen to know what universities that offer the best medical education? I'm more interested in the expertise than the status of the university.

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For the US I don't really know, but for the UK I'd say Cambridge, Imperal College London, Oxford, University College London and Edinburgh. Even if US was your primary choice the Scottish alternative could perhaps be interesting as we EU citizens can get away with a really cheap price for studying there. You can also apply to both US and UK in order to maximise your chances to get into a top university if that's what you want. However, even though you can apply to both it would possibly be good for you if you consider which of them is your first choice; due to that the admissions are rather different you will probably be more suited for one of them.

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For the US I don't really know, but for the UK I'd say Cambridge, Imperal College London, Oxford, University College London and Edinburgh. Even if US was your primary choice the Scottish alternative could perhaps be interesting as we EU citizens can get away with a really cheap price for studying there. You can also apply to both US and UK in order to maximise your chances to get into a top university if that's what you want. However, even though you can apply to both it would possibly be good for you if you consider which of them is your first choice; due to that the admissions are rather different you will probably be more suited for one of them.

If I had to choose, I would go for US, as long as I can afford it. I've been dreaming of living in America for a long time.

From what I've been told, it is harder to get in to the universities than an undergraduate programme. I've heard that they have very small qoutas for European citizens.

Do Norwegian students get the EU benefits even though we aren't members?

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Guest Soiboist

For the US I don't really know, but for the UK I'd say Cambridge, Imperal College London, Oxford, University College London and Edinburgh. Even if US was your primary choice the Scottish alternative could perhaps be interesting as we EU citizens can get away with a really cheap price for studying there. You can also apply to both US and UK in order to maximise your chances to get into a top university if that's what you want. However, even though you can apply to both it would possibly be good for you if you consider which of them is your first choice; due to that the admissions are rather different you will probably be more suited for one of them.

If I had to choose, I would go for US, as long as I can afford it. I've been dreaming of living in America for a long time.

From what I've been told, it is harder to get in to the universities than an undergraduate programme. I've heard that they have very small qoutas for European citizens.

Do Norwegian students get the EU benefits even though we aren't members?

****! For a moment I forgot the euroscepticism of the fellow neighbours to our west. :D Sorry, my mistake.

Well, I'm not the right person to talk about universities in the US, and I believe I have already shared the most of my knowledge of them in this thread. I'm certain there's someone else who can answer about quotas and so on though.

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there is no undergrad med program at Harvard.

closest to an undergrad med program is one of those 6-8 year programs that ensures you entrance to the medical school when you apply for their undergrad. eg. the med program at Brown.

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Guest Red XII

there is no undergrad med program at Harvard.

closest to an undergrad med program is one of those 6-8 year programs that ensures you entrance to the medical school when you apply for their undergrad. eg. the med program at Brown.

^

This.

Medical programs are graduate programs in the US. At the undergraduate level, those looking to go into medicine complete a pre-med program, which is sometimes a major but often not and which involves completing certain courses required for medical school admissions.

Many schools in the US offer direct med programs, which are extremely selective (they usually take less than 100 students per year) and generally offer automatic admission to the school's medical program after completing a four-year degree so long as the student maintains a certain GPA and other requirements.

At Harvard, you'd be applying as a student interested in a pre-med program, which wouldn't have too much of an impact on your application, as your intended major really only matters when it's an uncommon major and you've already demonstrated great interest in that field with your extracurriculars and your high school courseload.

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I agree with those above who have said that it doesn't matter as much where you do your undergraduate studies. You can google lists for top med schools in the US, but yes, it's much harder to get admission into a good med school (after you have your bachelor's) than it is to get into a good undergraduate school.

If you've always wanted to go to Harvard, go for it. I wish you the best! Excellent grades, maybe 2-3 ECs with some leadership roles, good recommendations from teachers and other adults, good SAT (or ACT) scores, and some deep thinking about you and your role and responsibility as a global citizen.

If you take a year off and you're not admitted to the college of your dreams, chances will be lower to get admitted, but it's stil possible. The admission officers should know you spent the year growing as a person.

I go to Harvard. I don't mind replying more in depth if you're interested. I also applied to several other schools in the US, so I can give some info about that. Make sure you apply to many schools because... everyone else is. Most people who apply to Harvard apply to many other top schools, so it's just harder to get in, unfortunately.

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I agree with those above who have said that it doesn't matter as much where you do your undergraduate studies. You can google lists for top med schools in the US, but yes, it's much harder to get admission into a good med school (after you have your bachelor's) than it is to get into a good undergraduate school.

If you've always wanted to go to Harvard, go for it. I wish you the best! Excellent grades, maybe 2-3 ECs with some leadership roles, good recommendations from teachers and other adults, good SAT (or ACT) scores, and some deep thinking about you and your role and responsibility as a global citizen.

If you take a year off and you're not admitted to the college of your dreams, chances will be lower to get admitted, but it's stil possible. The admission officers should know you spent the year growing as a person.

I go to Harvard. I don't mind replying more in depth if you're interested. I also applied to several other schools in the US, so I can give some info about that. Make sure you apply to many schools because... everyone else is. Most people who apply to Harvard apply to many other top schools, so it's just harder to get in, unfortunately.

I would love an in-depth reply!

I'm Norwegain, so that'll probably disadvantage me to some extent.

Currently I am the "deputy chairman" of a relatively small local branch of our national environmental organization for youths. I also play basketball. Do you think those ECs are sufficient?

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I agree with those above who have said that it doesn't matter as much where you do your undergraduate studies. You can google lists for top med schools in the US, but yes, it's much harder to get admission into a good med school (after you have your bachelor's) than it is to get into a good undergraduate school.

If you've always wanted to go to Harvard, go for it. I wish you the best! Excellent grades, maybe 2-3 ECs with some leadership roles, good recommendations from teachers and other adults, good SAT (or ACT) scores, and some deep thinking about you and your role and responsibility as a global citizen.

If you take a year off and you're not admitted to the college of your dreams, chances will be lower to get admitted, but it's stil possible. The admission officers should know you spent the year growing as a person.

I go to Harvard. I don't mind replying more in depth if you're interested. I also applied to several other schools in the US, so I can give some info about that. Make sure you apply to many schools because... everyone else is. Most people who apply to Harvard apply to many other top schools, so it's just harder to get in, unfortunately.

If you could write a fairly detailed overview of your grades/ECs... etc and the process you followed to get accepted into Harvard, I would be most appreciative. I have too contemplated my chances of getting into Harvard and I am very interested to know what it all takes.

Just to be a bit more specific, if I were to get 45/45 (my aim) for IB, and some good SAT scores (750+) what would my chances be with a mediocre EC list (I could only really put: Prefect, Dux of School (if I get it), first cricket team, first basketball team, some volunteer work and some photography prizes).

So if anyone could evaluate the above scenario and estimate my chances of getting into a top US university, that would be great.

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So if anyone could evaluate the above scenario and estimate my chances of getting into a top US university, that would be great.

As one of the OPs mentioned its the luck of the draw. It really comes down to how you present your application and make it sound impressive. Nobody can simply estimate your chances.

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I agree with those above who have said that it doesn't matter as much where you do your undergraduate studies. You can google lists for top med schools in the US, but yes, it's much harder to get admission into a good med school (after you have your bachelor's) than it is to get into a good undergraduate school.

If you've always wanted to go to Harvard, go for it. I wish you the best! Excellent grades, maybe 2-3 ECs with some leadership roles, good recommendations from teachers and other adults, good SAT (or ACT) scores, and some deep thinking about you and your role and responsibility as a global citizen.

If you take a year off and you're not admitted to the college of your dreams, chances will be lower to get admitted, but it's stil possible. The admission officers should know you spent the year growing as a person.

I go to Harvard. I don't mind replying more in depth if you're interested. I also applied to several other schools in the US, so I can give some info about that. Make sure you apply to many schools because... everyone else is. Most people who apply to Harvard apply to many other top schools, so it's just harder to get in, unfortunately.

I would love an in-depth reply!

I'm Norwegain, so that'll probably disadvantage me to some extent.

Currently I am the "deputy chairman" of a relatively small local branch of our national environmental organization for youths. I also play basketball. Do you think those ECs are sufficient?

I can't tell you what is "enough." An admissions officer who was assigned to read international students' applications last year said that she had to look at how students set themselves apart. I think she said that good grades, talent and hard work at a piano or another musical instrument was common. The things that parents made their children strive to do well in just made their applications look similar to the other applications, so it came to how a student could convey his or her interests and dedication differently. I can't tell you if what you're doing is enough. When I was applying, I felt I needed a lot of things on my resume. Like competitions and clubs and sports. Not being under that pressure right now, I can see how insecure I was about not having one thing I was spectacular at. That's why I did a lot of things. I don't think it's necessary to do many things. If you can bring out your passion for this environmental organization and your hopes its fundamental ideas, I think that's grand. Whatever you do, it's up to you to take it to a level that you're happy with. With basketball, what do you get out of the sport? Does it come easy to you to a certain extent? How do you balance being a team player and adding to the team your own strengths? Do what you're interested in, balance your time, explore if you can. And don't let the outcome of a college application make you regret what you did or did not do in your time now.

If you could write a fairly detailed overview of your grades/ECs... etc and the process you followed to get accepted into Harvard, I would be most appreciative. I have too contemplated my chances of getting into Harvard and I am very interested to know what it all takes.

Just to be a bit more specific, if I were to get 45/45 (my aim) for IB, and some good SAT scores (750+) what would my chances be with a mediocre EC list (I could only really put: Prefect, Dux of School (if I get it), first cricket team, first basketball team, some volunteer work and some photography prizes).

So if anyone could evaluate the above scenario and estimate my chances of getting into a top US university, that would be great.

Detailed overview? heh

So from the people I've talked to, it seems most of the people who get in aren't sure why. I'm one of those people. If I submitted the same application this year, I wouldn't be surprised if the outcome was different. So what I did is not something you can make a checklist out of. But here's the highlights as I recall:

I participated in math team for several years. I wasn't the best, so I wasn't particularly competitive. I enjoyed the team aspects and personal satisfaction from competing.

I started Spanish Club and learned a lot about how difficult it is to get everyone on the same page. It gave me a chance to develop organizational skills.

I also volunteered at my mosque and around town a lot. I did some student council vice pres and presidential things that grouped together faith, leadership, and a sense of community in my life. One of the latter things that influenced me was learning about the efforts of a mental health group that I helped with for my senior year. There were things that I did longer that didn't have as much of an impact, like playing some sports and starting another club. Looking back it didn't matter as much in terms of personal growth.

As far as academics, I didn't really have any stellar IB grades to give to colleges. I had a few 5s in AP courses. I was taking the most rigorous classes I could, and I got a combined 2190 in SAT1. Not mind-blowingly high. I don't know how to feel about SAT scores, really. On the one hand, it's a good score. On the other hand, I don't try to say that I did a great job like people who got 2300s. For SATII I took chem, physics and math 2 and got from 730 to 790. GPA wise, I was ranked first in my class. But rank and scores don't determine much after you pass the threshold.

As for chances.. it sounds like you'll pass the threshold. Your essays and recommendations will give the admissions team an idea of who you are beyond scores. Don't underestimate yourself as a person. It's a good way to keep your expectations low so you don't get hurt, I've found, but you should also be able to recognize that you've got a limited amount of time and you're spending it in ways that you enjoy (I hope) and ways that will be beneficial to your future. Even though your chances as an international student are more difficult than chances of a domestic student, don't tell yourself you have to get a 45. Or a 44, etc. From the bottom of my heart I want to assure you it's not about perfection. Potential, ambition, IB values, some unique background that you possess to enhance the entire class.

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Detailed overview? heh

So from the people I've talked to, it seems most of the people who get in aren't sure why. I'm one of those people. If I submitted the same application this year, I wouldn't be surprised if the outcome was different. So what I did is not something you can make a checklist out of. But here's the highlights as I recall:

I participated in math team for several years. I wasn't the best, so I wasn't particularly competitive. I enjoyed the team aspects and personal satisfaction from competing.

I started Spanish Club and learned a lot about how difficult it is to get everyone on the same page. It gave me a chance to develop organizational skills.

I also volunteered at my mosque and around town a lot. I did some student council vice pres and presidential things that grouped together faith, leadership, and a sense of community in my life. One of the latter things that influenced me was learning about the efforts of a mental health group that I helped with for my senior year. There were things that I did longer that didn't have as much of an impact, like playing some sports and starting another club. Looking back it didn't matter as much in terms of personal growth.

As far as academics, I didn't really have any stellar IB grades to give to colleges. I had a few 5s in AP courses. I was taking the most rigorous classes I could, and I got a combined 2190 in SAT1. Not mind-blowingly high. I don't know how to feel about SAT scores, really. On the one hand, it's a good score. On the other hand, I don't try to say that I did a great job like people who got 2300s. For SATII I took chem, physics and math 2 and got from 730 to 790. GPA wise, I was ranked first in my class. But rank and scores don't determine much after you pass the threshold.

As for chances.. it sounds like you'll pass the threshold. Your essays and recommendations will give the admissions team an idea of who you are beyond scores. Don't underestimate yourself as a person. It's a good way to keep your expectations low so you don't get hurt, I've found, but you should also be able to recognize that you've got a limited amount of time and you're spending it in ways that you enjoy (I hope) and ways that will be beneficial to your future. Even though your chances as an international student are more difficult than chances of a domestic student, don't tell yourself you have to get a 45. Or a 44, etc. From the bottom of my heart I want to assure you it's not about perfection. Potential, ambition, IB values, some unique background that you possess to enhance the entire class.

Wow, thanks for the post! Some really useful information.

So, from what I gather your main point is to just be yourself and do the best you can in the things you are interested in, whilst also trying to stand out a bit. I can see how the generic "good grades + high SATs" would not stand out much in a Harvard Admission, so I will definitely try a few different ECs out and see what happens from there. Thans again!

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I am hoping to get accepted to Harvard as for the medical undergradute programme.

Does anybody know anythign about

- What grades are necessary?

- Other required qualifications?

- The chances of acceptance for a foreign student?

- The significance of a year spent doing something else after IB?

- How the admissions are determined?

Thanks!

Quick question, if you do Med School in the States won't you be obligated to practice medicine only in the US? At least it's like that with Law and I thought medicine was the same, but I'm not sure

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Quick question, if you do Med School in the States won't you be obligated to practice medicine only in the US? At least it's like that with Law and I thought medicine was the same, but I'm not sure

I'm not so sure about medicine, but I do know it's not like that with Law. I am currently studying at LSE and am hoping to get into an insanely competitive programme for a transfer at Columbia Law school. If I get in (fingers crossed), I will get a JD in Law from Columbia at the end of it all and I will still come back to India and practice, there aren't any rules forbidding me from doing that, none that I know of.

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