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IA (HL) Portfolio Type I -- Shadow Functions

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Has anybody got the Shadow Functions Portfolio?

I'm stuck on what the shadow generating function of the quartic function is... HELP!

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HEEEELP!!!!

I'm doing my first first part of the portfolio at the moment, and i am doing it about shadow functions!!!

Anyone who already did it!!! I need help!!

I just dont know who to get to y2 in the cubic function grave: y=(x+2)(x-(3+2i))(x-(3-2i))

Thank you sooo much!!


hey :) i am really really sorry, but i cant really help you with your question, but i thought that you might can help me!!! i'm trying since ages to get the function for y2 for the second (the cubic) function grave!!!

you would do me a huge favour with it!

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HEEEELP!!!!

I'm doing my first first part of the portfolio at the moment, and i am doing it about shadow functions!!!

Anyone who already did it!!! I need help!!

I just dont know who to get to y2 in the cubic function grave: y=(x+2)(x-(3+2i))(x-(3-2i))

Thank you sooo much!!


hey :) i am really really sorry, but i cant really help you with your question, but i thought that you might can help me!!! i'm trying since ages to get the function for y2 for the second (the cubic) function grave!!!

you would do me a huge favour with it!

Don't you have the zeros of y2? Just build a function with these, and you'll be fine! (x-a1)(x-a2)(x-a3) where an are the zeros!

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Noticed theres another shadow fucntions thread but didnt want to hijack.

Im completely stuck at point 4 of part B where it wants a provable general statement, that point is extremely broad, what exactly does should that general statement acheive? or what should it show?

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Noticed theres another shadow fucntions thread but didnt want to hijack.

Im completely stuck at point 4 of part B where it wants a provable general statement, that point is extremely broad, what exactly does should that general statement acheive? or what should it show?

I guess you have to say what you did in Part A with the quadratic function. What was the shadow-generating function? How did you get it? What is/are the equations of the shadow-generating functions?

You may also want to use the general statement you made to prove the quartics and quintics, so always try to keep in my what variables you'll need to prove your statement, like Ym and the equation! :D

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Noticed theres another shadow fucntions thread but didnt want to hijack.

Im completely stuck at point 4 of part B where it wants a provable general statement, that point is extremely broad, what exactly does should that general statement acheive? or what should it show?

Point 4 asks you to find a general statement that relate y1, y2, and ym where y1 and y2 are cubic functions. Then you must prove this statement to show that it works for cubic function.

Edited by bomaha

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Noticed theres another shadow fucntions thread but didnt want to hijack.

Don't worry about hijacking a portfolio thread! Anyone can ask a question related to the task in this thread, and someone out there may be able to help you. Go ahead and post your questions in this thread :)

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Well, I did a lot of research with two of my friends, and found out a general pattern for the ym function, but we then realized that whe needed the b parameter, which we do not know! Graphically, we cannot see complex roots, and the question in mainly focusing on graph interpretation.

This IA is seriously pissing me off. It's like way too broad, it seems endless! And I want 18+/20 :( .

Edited by iHubble

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"On a labelled diagram, illustrate how the zeros of y2 may be helpful in the determination of the real and imaginary components of the complex zeros of y1 ."

Does anyone know how the zeros of y2 are related to the zeros of y1? I have no clue what to do here

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"On a labelled diagram, illustrate how the zeros of y2 may be helpful in the determination of the real and imaginary components of the complex zeros of y1 ."

Anyone know what the relation of the real zeros of y2 are to that of y1?

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Well, just graph y1, ym and y2 on the same graphic. Then, identify every roots and intersection points. You'll know the relation between the three main functions as you compare them.

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glad to know im not the only one struggling with this IA....ugh! and to the above post, yes an introduction is required. think of this as an essay for any other class.

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I suggest reading the topic about Mathematics Portfolio Tips and such. It was really helpful for me! For my part, I did a 700 words introduction and talked about polynomial functions, roots, some history, the IA, software used and some mathematical basic informations for the task. Hope it helps for the intro :) .

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Hey guys, I'm doing this portfolio atm now. But I am quite stuck on how to find the point of intersection on Part B. I know on the x axis due to the real root (x+2) means that the coordinate on the x axis is -2, 0 [which is one point of intersection]. However (I think using the complex roots) I need to find out how to calculate the other point of intersection in order to find the gradient/ ym. :) help would be greatly, seriously greatly appreciated.

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