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Is my EE topic at all feasible? (physics)

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Okay, so I've decided to do my EE in Physics, but I'm having some trouble thinking of some topics. The one topic that my teacher did sign off on is "What factors make the sound of fingernails scratching on a chalkboard so irritating?".

While this does interest me, I can't think of how to start and what to do... If I change, say, the frequency, then do a survey, what does that prove? Also, would there be anything else that I could change besides volume/intensity?

I'm kinda stuck with my ideas right now, so if someone could point me in the right direction, that would be awesome... If not... what other options are available to me that are similar in nature to my idea?

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Okay, so I've decided to do my EE in Physics, but I'm having some trouble thinking of some topics. The one topic that my teacher did sign off on is "What factors make the sound of fingernails scratching on a chalkboard so irritating?".

While this does interest me, I can't think of how to start and what to do... If I change, say, the frequency, then do a survey, what does that prove? Also, would there be anything else that I could change besides volume/intensity?

I'm kinda stuck with my ideas right now, so if someone could point me in the right direction, that would be awesome... If not... what other options are available to me that are similar in nature to my idea?

From what I see, it sounds more of like a psychology question than a physics question.

But to make it more physics, why not test the sound instead, and look at the waves, the troughs, etc. It will give you a more scientific reasoning. And compare it to other sounds, screeching, etc. What makes this kind of wave special?

Plus you can say, how our brains react to it, but that may be a little more about biology.

This will be more physics than psychology.

Hope this helps!

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As was said, it depends a lot on psychology as well as on the actual physics. Everyone I've talked to has recommended choosing a question that was strongly focused on a specific area. The Filipino Limner seems to have come up with a great way to do that.

Just warning you now though, you'll end up doing a lot of trials, so if you find the sound really annoying be prepared to be really annoyed A LOT.

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From what I see, it sounds more of like a psychology question than a physics question.

But to make it more physics, why not test the sound instead, and look at the waves, the troughs, etc. It will give you a more scientific reasoning. And compare it to other sounds, screeching, etc. What makes this kind of wave special?

Plus you can say, how our brains react to it, but that may be a little more about biology.

This will be more physics than psychology.

Hope this helps!

What do you mean, test the sound? Do you just mean comparing it with different kinds of annoying sounds or actually doing testing?

As was said, it depends a lot on psychology as well as on the actual physics. Everyone I've talked to has recommended choosing a question that was strongly focused on a specific area. The Filipino Limner seems to have come up with a great way to do that.

Just warning you now though, you'll end up doing a lot of trials, so if you find the sound really annoying be prepared to be really annoyed A LOT.

Yeah, my teacher suggested that if I was going to do a survey I would need a lot of data points, like over 50. I was just wondering, what do you mean by "The Filipino Limner"?

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From what I see, it sounds more of like a psychology question than a physics question.

But to make it more physics, why not test the sound instead, and look at the waves, the troughs, etc. It will give you a more scientific reasoning. And compare it to other sounds, screeching, etc. What makes this kind of wave special?

Plus you can say, how our brains react to it, but that may be a little more about biology.

This will be more physics than psychology.

Hope this helps!

What do you mean, test the sound? Do you just mean comparing it with different kinds of annoying sounds or actually doing testing?

As was said, it depends a lot on psychology as well as on the actual physics. Everyone I've talked to has recommended choosing a question that was strongly focused on a specific area. The Filipino Limner seems to have come up with a great way to do that.

Just warning you now though, you'll end up doing a lot of trials, so if you find the sound really annoying be prepared to be really annoyed A LOT.

Yeah, my teacher suggested that if I was going to do a survey I would need a lot of data points, like over 50. I was just wondering, what do you mean by "The Filipino Limner"?

The guy that posted above me.

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From what I see, it sounds more of like a psychology question than a physics question.

But to make it more physics, why not test the sound instead, and look at the waves, the troughs, etc. It will give you a more scientific reasoning. And compare it to other sounds, screeching, etc. What makes this kind of wave special?

Plus you can say, how our brains react to it, but that may be a little more about biology.

This will be more physics than psychology.

Hope this helps!

What do you mean, test the sound? Do you just mean comparing it with different kinds of annoying sounds or actually doing testing?

As was said, it depends a lot on psychology as well as on the actual physics. Everyone I've talked to has recommended choosing a question that was strongly focused on a specific area. The Filipino Limner seems to have come up with a great way to do that.

Just warning you now though, you'll end up doing a lot of trials, so if you find the sound really annoying be prepared to be really annoyed A LOT.

Yeah, my teacher suggested that if I was going to do a survey I would need a lot of data points, like over 50. I was just wondering, what do you mean by "The Filipino Limner"?

The guy that posted above me.

Wow, I feel stupid now. Okay, so right now I just feel like heading in that direction just makes it less what I wanted it to resemble in the first place, which is why is that sound so annoying in the first place? Is that just not possible to do for a physics EE?

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From what I see, it sounds more of like a psychology question than a physics question.

But to make it more physics, why not test the sound instead, and look at the waves, the troughs, etc. It will give you a more scientific reasoning. And compare it to other sounds, screeching, etc. What makes this kind of wave special?

Plus you can say, how our brains react to it, but that may be a little more about biology.

This will be more physics than psychology.

Hope this helps!

What do you mean, test the sound? Do you just mean comparing it with different kinds of annoying sounds or actually doing testing?

As was said, it depends a lot on psychology as well as on the actual physics. Everyone I've talked to has recommended choosing a question that was strongly focused on a specific area. The Filipino Limner seems to have come up with a great way to do that.

Just warning you now though, you'll end up doing a lot of trials, so if you find the sound really annoying be prepared to be really annoyed A LOT.

Yeah, my teacher suggested that if I was going to do a survey I would need a lot of data points, like over 50. I was just wondering, what do you mean by "The Filipino Limner"?

The guy that posted above me.

Wow, I feel stupid now. Okay, so right now I just feel like heading in that direction just makes it less what I wanted it to resemble in the first place, which is why is that sound so annoying in the first place? Is that just not possible to do for a physics EE?

From what I understand for a physics EE you need to do an experiment with an DV and IV related to physics concepts from which to use data that you can manipulate to come to a conclusion, and from what you're talking about it seems like you'd base it more on the opinions of others, and that wouldn't work with physics.

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From what I understand for a physics EE you need to do an experiment with an DV and IV related to physics concepts from which to use data that you can manipulate to come to a conclusion, and from what you're talking about it seems like you'd base it more on the opinions of others, and that wouldn't work with physics.

Huh. Okay I'll have to consult with my advisor again with what both you guys posted. Thanks!

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