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How Many Hours Of Personal Study Per Night ( Not Homework)

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Hello!

I have recently started my first year of IB and so far so good ( except for maths, but i'm not here to whine). I wanted to know, since none of my teachers have a straight answer and seem like they don't know their own job, how many hours of PERSONAL study I should be doing per night. That is after I have successfully completed my homework, and I revise the topic I am currently studying.

I have created myself a little ( big) schedule for my personal study/revision. This schedule includes 16 hours of personal work per week, not including homeworks and assignments. 2 hours on weekdays, no work on friday and 8 hours on the weekend.

So my questions are:

a) How many hours do you think I SHOULD be doing in order to achieve a 6 or above in all IB subjects and is it achievable by a normally intelligent man.

b) Do you think my current schedule is reasonable?

c) I often find myself with all the the reasons in the world to work, but yet do no find the inner will to kick my own ass and work, how do I fix this? Thank you.

Kind Regards, my friends.

Nicolas.Prieur

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Well, at least in my case my studying really varies because I have some pretty coast-by weeks where I'm not given much work or tests and thus only do about an hour a day (or less). Then, there's days where I have surmounts of work and then it's about 5 hours per day (during the week). Hmm on average I think 2 hours is a pretty reasonable bet, and you should do fine at that level. Good luck with your two years of IB! :D

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Guest Mo Rahman

It's a very interesting question you bring up my friend and one that is common. Although I'm no expert, I would really say it just depends on what kind of learner you are. If you're someone who picks things up quickly and is able to learn effectively then studying for long excessive hours is pointless. Well, not pointless, more just a waste; I'd just make sure you cover everything and always make sure you've done what you need to get a 6. The only time I suggest you do this is before exams (so for like a period of a month or two before exams).

However, if you're someone who needs time to understand things; someone who needs to reprocess information and repeat things to get a sound understanding then of course, study for 2 hours or even longer if needed.

You're still quite "new" to the Diploma so I think for now it's best if you just try to find your footing, get to grips with the different types of works you have to do and the workload. Once you learn more about how things work and what you need to do to get those top grades, start making decisions based on that.

Hope I helped. Sorry it wasn't a sure fire answer. (Btw, one thing the IB has taught me is that teachers love to talk crap!)

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I think the rule is do as much as you need. I, however, find myself fine once I finish all my homework and revise for a while. For some subjects, like math, I may do extra problems, but there's no set amount of time to study. You have to study more for you weaknesses and you can 'sort' of blow off the other subject.

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Sounds like a good plan. Although others might be saying 'oh that's too little' or something like that, remember, ACTIONS SPEAK LOUDER THAN WORDS!

It's important to carry out actions rather than just planning the schedule out (that's the problem I always struggle with :( )

Also, EFFICIENCY is important. Better to focus for 2 hours rather than doing all the chatting, getting distracted and doing the work at the same time for 5 hours!

Cheers. :)

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I was just wondering how much work you need to do nightly, and on weekends, to get consistent 7's?

Ive been doing 4 hours a night and about 4 a day on weekends, but is this too much you think, or do you guys do more?

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I was just wondering how much work you need to do nightly, and on weekends, to get consistent 7's?

Ive been doing 4 hours a night and about 4 a day on weekends, but is this too much you think, or do you guys do more?

It honestly depends on the subject. For subjects like Psychology, you will need much more than that, but for most subjects that's about good.

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4 hours per class?4 hours for study or homework( or both at the same time or idk)? any ways you need to spend as much time on stuff in till you understand the material... if you under start

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As users before have said, it depends on your subjects. As a general rule of thumb, HL's should take up more time, and subjects in which you needs to understand concepts rather than memorise, should also take more time.

For example, let's take my subjects (in my signature). The one which requires most study is probably Physics, then Biology, as I have to understand so much in physics, and memorise so much in Biology. Then the humanities, like Psychology, Economics and BAM and the likes, which require less memorisation than Biology, and less understanding than, say, physics or chemistry. Lastly, languages. I'm pretty good at languages, so I'd study them less. This is the one area which you have to judge your own skill and from that, determine your required amount of study.

4 hours a night seems a little extreme for me, but I guess you're much more determined and less lazy than I :P. Good luck to you :)

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As users before have said, it depends on your subjects. As a general rule of thumb, HL's should take up more time, and subjects in which you needs to understand concepts rather than memorise, should also take more time.

For example, let's take my subjects (in my signature). The one which requires most study is probably Physics, then Biology, as I have to understand so much in physics, and memorise so much in Biology. Then the humanities, like Psychology, Economics and BAM and the likes, which require less memorisation than Biology, and less understanding than, say, physics or chemistry. Lastly, languages. I'm pretty good at languages, so I'd study them less. This is the one area which you have to judge your own skill and from that, determine your required amount of study.

4 hours a night seems a little extreme for me, but I guess you're much more determined and less lazy than I :P. Good luck to you :)

I agree with you that Group 3 subjects require much more time than other subjects. It is very much subjective (lol) though.

Edit: QA Represent!

Edited by Jaydon

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I personally find it restrictive if I make a schedule and force myself to stick to it. I study by looking at how much I actually need to study for a particular subject at the moment in time. That way I can adjust my studying to what I am learning at school. However, my best advice would be don't listen to what other people say about their studying habits - especially the ones who are crazy study fanatics. It puts you off and makes you doubt yourself. If you are studying less than them, but are happy with where you are going, good for you and stick to it. Don't let others change the way you study.

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It depends on what type of a person are you. Some people just hates to be restricted to studying with schedules thus they study at their own pace. Although this is good and relaxing but if their pace means no studying then that's not a good pace. A schedule might be better.

From my experience, don't expect too much from your schedules. Chances are you might not be able to fulfill it. Just try to be flexible and follow your schedule as best as you can.

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