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Hi guys this is my first question on this Site. I have physics,chemistry and math HL and business and management, and others at SL. I wanted to pursue engineering since beginning. However, now I am interested in the theoretical part of physics and chemistry more. Which degree should I pursue? Engineering or Bachelor in subject degree. As an IB student, which career in science will benefit me more?

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Well, a BSc in Physics would therefore seem the order of the day. However, you also have to think about employability - it's true that simply stating that Engineers have more career security than theorists is a lie, it depends on skill and specialisation; however nonetheless it would be advisable to bear career prospects in mind. Certain fields of theoretical science lead primarily to university research postings, which may or may not be to your liking. If you still want to go into industry while learning theory, I would suggest perhaps nuclear physics or something similar; might be the best of both worlds. Also, a dual degree is an option if you're applying for universities that offer them - physics and engineering as a dual-degree would allow you to enjoy learning pure theory while also increasing your employability. There are also single-degrees that blend the fields, such as biochemical engineering, which would allow you to explore more chemical theory as well.

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Hi guys this is my first question on this Site. I have physics,chemistry and math HL and business and management, and others at SL. I wanted to pursue engineering for long. However, now I am interested in the theoretical part of physics and chemistry more. Which degree should I pursue? Engineering or Bachelor in subject degree. As an IB student, hat which career in science will benefit me more?

Although there is a great deal of overlap between science and engineering, you can choose your field of study at university according to whether you feel that you are fundamentally more interested in advancing scientific knowledge itself, or in applying that knowledge to improve the human condition. In either science or engineering, most university studies are not vocationally oriented, but stress basic theoretical principles and research methods that can be applied throughout your subsequent career.

Even at a particle physics lab such as CERN, there are many more openings for engineers (especially electronics and computer engineers) than for theoretical physicists. But a good degree in physics or mathematical physics still opens doors to challenging and interesting engineering work if you decide not to pursue pure science after graduation.

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