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Using the Zimbardo Stanford Prison Experiment

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- is it okay?

My teacher said we should not use the Zimbaro Stanford Prison Experiment for the question in SLA that asks for an evaluation on social identity theory. He said there are too many factors involved in the Zimbardo experiment. However, I find the experiment very intriguing and easy to memorise/ very applicable to a lot of other questions. So do you recommend that I still use the Zimbardo experiment for some questions in the SLA, particularly to demonstrate one of the principles in SLA, to illustrate situational factors, and to be an example for one of the research methods (experiment)? Any thoughts? What would be a good substitute if not?

Thanks

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I would recommend you don't use it either. It's very messy and difficult to explain clearly IMO. I would use the football team study on helping behavior instead (Levine et al., 2005). I think you'll find it easy to remember as well.

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For evaluating the social identity theory use Tajfel's Kandinsky versus Klee experiment (1971)

You could use Zimbardo's experiment for research methods or ethical issues

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Milgram and Stanford experiments are no no in IB psychology because they explain obedience not conformity so DO NOT USE THEM.

Edited by momentalus

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Just as Blindpet said, do not use that study. If you look at it as a whole, the experiment was never completed and it is highly unetchical. You should use Levine et al instead. DO NOT use the Zimbardo prison. :) even though it feels like a good study to use.

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Milgram and Stanford experiments are no no in IB psychology because they explain obedience not conformity so DO NOT USE THEM.

Oh.... now I can't use the Milgram experiment too? :/

I guess it does make sense because it surely has more to do with obedience than it has with conformity.

However I still think the Milgram obedience experiments will suit the SLA question on the roles of dispositional/situational factors as an experimental illustration of a situational factor.

Thanks for your help!

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I'm using the Milgram and I've been told that one can use the Milgram study. It's perfect for ethical considerations. And that social factors influences our behaviour.

I say, use Milgram. :)

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On the contrary, I believe you can use the Zimbardo Standard Prison Experiment as a short, supplementary research in which it adds to the argument that conformity can happen in a much more severe context?

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