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Is there a way to predict your IB grade (1-7) from your current grades? Let's say I have been getting 70% uncurved on my biology tests, which are made from old IB exams and graded using the markschemes, what 1-7 grade does that translate too? Is there a way to put IA in aswell?

BAZ

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Is there a way to predict your IB grade (1-7) from your current grades? Let's say I have been getting 70% uncurved on my biology tests, which are made from old IB exams and graded using the markschemes, what 1-7 grade does that translate too? Is there a way to put IA in aswell?

BAZ

It would depend on your school policy, so what they believe is a 7. Some schools are harsh and some are generous and some are mixed.

At my school 70% and above is a 7, but in the IBO marking scheme of 2006, you would need above 81% to get a 7

According to 2006 mark boundaries, 70% would be a 6

http://www.ibsurvival.com/forum/index.php?...amp;hl=#Biology

Mark boundaries change every year, I think they set the mark boundaries after the exams are marked

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It all depends on your school. My school likes to lowball all our predicteds so it doesn't reflect badly on our school if the students end up underachieving the predicteds.

For biology, what happens is that you have to get within the grade boundary to get that predicted grade. Example, I got a 96% in biology and I was predicted a 7 because the boundaries for biology for a 7 are 96-100%. My friend got an 88% in biology and was predicted a 5 because his mark is in the range for a level 5. Each school does it differently though, so it all depends on what your system is.

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Anywhere from 36-38..our careers adviser didn't tell us so that we'd work for it and not just assume we'd get the grade lol.

I got into Warwick though and they require 36 points so I guess it has to be somewhere around there..

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It all depends on your school. My school likes to lowball all our predicteds so it doesn't reflect badly on our school if the students end up underachieving the predicteds.

For biology, what happens is that you have to get within the grade boundary to get that predicted grade. Example, I got a 96% in biology and I was predicted a 7 because the boundaries for biology for a 7 are 96-100%. My friend got an 88% in biology and was predicted a 5 because his mark is in the range for a level 5. Each school does it differently though, so it all depends on what your system is.

Omg! Your school sure is harsh! I just got 70% from my biology test and here it's a 7, would that be like a 3 at your school? And how can you achieve such a high mark? How long do you study for a test?

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I think the percentage ratios are different with different subjects.

For example in maths & physics, i need to get at least 84% for a 7. (not really sure if it's 84..)

But in Chem i need at least 93% <--- i've complained about this but the teacher says she's sure that it's 93 % ~.~

But i think the reasonable range for a 7 is 81%~100%

with 70% i think it's a 6

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Omg! Your school sure is harsh! I just got 70% from my biology test and here it's a 7, would that be like a 3 at your school? And how can you achieve such a high mark? How long do you study for a test?

Yeah my school's harsh because many people get conditonal acceptances that depend on their final grades, and it'll be worse if you have high predicteds and then don't end up achieving what you were predicted and a uni had to withdraw an offer.

Um, I'm just good at bio :mellow: haha I have a really good short-term memory that comes in very handy for memorizing things. I don't really study that long for a test..I study the night before a test for about 2-5 hours (depending on what subject it is and how hard it is), but I never study any earlier because my memory is only good for short term and cramming works better for me lol.

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Are these 81%+ boundaries the boundaries for the final exams too? Because I usually get in the 80's or 90's in bio tests, but I believe that that translates to a 5. (I have an avg of 88). It would suck not to get accepted at a university because my predicteds were too low, then go and ace the exams.

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Yes, but your teacher might have easier exams or some other reason for having such high boundaries. But 70-80% is usually enough for a 7 in experimental sciences, in Bio I believe it's around 80.

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Yes, but your teacher might have easier exams or some other reason for having such high boundaries. But 70-80% is usually enough for a 7 in experimental sciences, in Bio I believe it's around 80.

Yeah, the school grades are not the most objective. Our school has a ridiculous grade inflation, where apparently 30% of students score marks corresponding to the top tenth percentile (yeah, it sound stupid doesnt it??). If you want to know your predicted grades talk to your IBC, but always take these grades with a grain of salt. Don't let them either boost or undermine your confidence.

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Our DPC, predicted the grades from the annual subject marks. Thus, as we're using 7 unit system as our basic assesment, we had to just add the marks that we've got from the first year.

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my school's extremely strict on the predicted grades. i really need the predicted grades to apply for university, but nooo, they have to be mean and refuse to up the grade. you can expect about 1 grade higher for your final IB exam... maybe 2 grades, if you study real hard for it and do loads of practice questions.

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