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Tragic oral commentary and discussion

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I did my oral commentary and discussion two days ago, and I still feel horrible about it. My analysis was pretty solid, but I stuttered the whole time, and it honestly sounded as though I had no idea what I was talking about. Worst of all, in my introduction, I forgot to say whether I would be using a linear or conceptual approach, and towards the end, I ran out of time and started rushing a lot, which made me miss a few important things. But the discussion was TRAGIC. On the first question, I kind of zoned out and forgot what my teacher said, so the first minute was almost completely silent except for the occasional desperate attempt to say something. There were a million pauses throughout the speech, and a few times I didn't even answer the question right. I don't know, the whole thing was so horrible. I just feel so awful now and I can't get over the fact that I completely screwed up 15 marks on my official grade. Am I completely screwed?

P.S. my commentary was on Shakespeare's "All the World's a Stage" and the discussion was on Joseph Conrad's "An Outpost of Progress"

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well, I did my oral commentary as well, May 25th. I didn't do so well, however, I knew what I was talking about, I just couldn't get it into proper words, you know? I tripped over my words quite a bit, and I had awkward pauses as well. My teacher could tell I was nervous, and that didn't help. I don't think that you are screwed, as you still have the IB English exam to take, so I think you'll be alright. No worries (:

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You don't have to state whether you're using a linear or conceptual approach. Picking between the two approaches is mainly to help you organize your thoughts better. It's actually better if you don't mention it at all; it sounds really basic and unprofessional to say "I will be using a linear approach for this commentary". The examiner will figure it out by listening to what you have to say.

There's no real "right answer" in English, as long as you can explain it so that what you say actually makes sense, it should be fine. Regurgitating what was said in class about a particular symbol/motif/literary device isn't necessarily the best route.

The oral commentary is only worth 15% so there are other opportunities to do well, just use this experience as motivation to do better next time.

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