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Hydridization

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could someone please explain hybridization to me...i just can't understand it. I understand that sub-level orbitals combine but how do i tell which molecule is which hybridization.

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[quote name='purple.haze' post='15621' date='Apr 27 2008, 12:24 AM']could someone please explain hybridization to me...i just can't understand it. I understand that sub-level orbitals combine but how do i tell which molecule is which hybridization.[/quote]

Well, I don't quite understand what you mean when you ask which molecule is which hybridization. However, I had a bit of trouble with it myself, and I found [url="http://www.mhhe.com/physsci/chemistry/essentialchemistry/flash/hybrv18.swf"]this website[/url] really helpful, and it shows you exactly what is going on. :blum:

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[quote name='Mandiloquence]Well' date=' I don't quite understand what you mean when you ask which molecule is which hybridization. However, I had a bit of trouble with it myself, and I found this website really helpful, and it shows you exactly what is going on. :blum: [/quote']
That website helped me alot as well, but I'm the type of person that needs to read something to understand it.
[url="http://dl.clackamas.edu/ch106-02/typesof.htm"]This site[/url] helped me learn it.

Edit: I'm sorry, my bbcode skills are slacking. Fixed the link. Edited by IBMan9000

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what i mean is, how do i tell which bonding is which hybridization (e.g. if its sp, sp[sup]2[/sup], or sp[sup]3[/sup])

basically something which answers a question like this
[img]http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v625/deadflappin/hybridizationquestion.jpg[/img]

btw, thanks for the link and IBMan..the link doesnt work

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If the answer is B, then its because there are all sigma bonds (and unpaired valence electrons, they count) in N2H4 (and therefore sp3), but one pi bond between the nitrogen atoms in N2H2 that leaves one p orbital unhybridized, and therefore sp2. If there was a third molecule listed, N2, then it would be sp because there are two p orbitals unhybridized. It's easier to understand in carbon because there are no unpaired electrons. In carbon, there are 4 bonds that have to form. If all four of them are sigma bonds, then it has to be sp3 because its a combination of the s orbital and all three p orbitals, leaving 4 hybridized orbitals. If the carbon has a double bond, and therefore a pi bond, then it would be sp2 because one orbital did not get included in the hybridization. With a triple bond, the carbon atom has two pi bonds and therefore two p orbitals are not involved in the hybridization, leaving only the s and one p orbital to hybridize (sp).

I'm sorry if I explained something wrong, but that explanation was given by my 70 year old chemistry teacher that doesn't speak english.
[url="http://www.mhhe.com/physsci/chemistry/animations/chang_7e_esp/bom5s2_6.swf"]http://www.mhhe.com/physsci/chemistry/anim...sp/bom5s2_6.swf[/url]
This flash animation also helped me understand hybridization.

Edit: Had to make sure the link worked this time, the link above should work also. Edited by IBMan9000

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the answer is B because the nitrogen in number one and two share 3 pairs of electrons and one lone paired electron we call this shape pyramidal and the angle between the bonds is equal to 107, the hybridization for this is sp[sup]3[/sup], now for the third and the fourth nitrogen shares a double bond with each other, one hydrogen bond and ONE LONE PAIRED, now in the hybridization we exclude the the pi bonds so we remove one of the doubled bonds nitrogen, ending up with one bond with hydrogen, one bond with nitrogen and ONE LONE PAIR, when we have a lone pair we call the shape of the hybridization V-shaped which means it have one lone pair or 2 and 2 pair of electron (the angle between the bonds is equal to 105), and so this hybridization is sp[sup]2[/sup] (very important to know that after hybridization all the energy levels involved in the hybridization are of the same energy) Edited by jojo

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Guest The X
Can absolutely recommend this one: [url="http://www.filedropper.com/hybridization14demo"]http://www.filedropper.com/hybridization14demo[/url]
It's a hybridization powerpoint, featuring hybridization with great animations and graphics!

Kudos to the person who made this!

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