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Math HL IA - how to start?

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I get the math for the portfolio but I have no idea on how to write it.. what kind of notation do you use? what kind of language? when they say things like find out which nimbers are divisible - do you literally show your working and just highlight the ones that are...?? none of my class really knows what to do...

is it just my teacher and my class... or does everyone feel like this in the beginning??

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[quote name='appleme' post='16263' date='May 8 2008, 05:04 PM']I get the math for the portfolio but I have no idea on how to write it.. what kind of notation do you use? what kind of language? when they say things like find out which nimbers are divisible - do you literally show your working and just highlight the ones that are...?? none of my class really knows what to do...

is it just my teacher and my class... or does everyone feel like this in the beginning??[/quote]

I definitely felt that way when I did my first IA. You'll get the hang of it, just look at as many marked exemplars as you can to see how it's done >.< . It's really not that hard, trust me.

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[quote name='blindpet' post='16266' date='May 8 2008, 05:05 PM']I definitely felt that way when I did my first IA. You'll get the hang of it, just look at as many marked exemplars as you can to see how it's done >.< . It's really not that hard, trust me.[/quote]

hmmm marked exemplars? any idea where i could get my hands on them? The school is having a long weekend until tuesday when the ia is due so i cant ask my math teacher...

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If you have a Math textbook, you can probably see the way proofs are laid out there. I'd suggest you try an articulate your methods in paragraph form, and then interrupt the paragraphs with formulas/solutions/proofs to help support the text. People in my class got points taken off from Communication for doing things like "x^2"; learn how to use Microsoft Equation Editor in Word or a software like Mathematica, that will make it quite easy to create what looks like complex notation.

jbhasin

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[quote name='jbhasin' post='16293' date='May 9 2008, 01:29 AM']If you have a Math textbook, you can probably see the way proofs are laid out there. I'd suggest you try an articulate your methods in paragraph form, and then interrupt the paragraphs with formulas/solutions/proofs to help support the text. People in my class got points taken off from Communication for doing things like "x^2"; learn how to use Microsoft Equation Editor in Word or a software like Mathematica, that will make it quite easy to create what looks like complex notation.

jbhasin[/quote]

thanks for the tips
;)

equation editor is really making it look good (even if its not really ;) )

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helpful IA hints passed on from my HL maths class :angry:

- don't use words if it could be explained better with numbers/proofs
- generally they want info in one of three ways: tables, graphs or equations
- set it out very neatly, using MS Word is probably the best --> [b]i think it is actually requested by the IBO now that you type your Maths IA anyway[/b]
- don't overuse words! its a [u]maths[/u] IA, they want you to be as 'mathematically minded' as possible
- when explaining, remember to use your maths lingo!! there is usually a proper name for everything so check it up in your textbook
- RESEARCH!!! if you are having issues, google it. chances are you will either find someone who has done this IA, a discussion group, or a similar problem you can work off
- again RESEARCH! if you are unsure how to write an IA, there are examples lurking in some hidden places on the net :D
- read the entire thing through first, then leave it, come back later and make a start -- don't under-estimate your subconscious...it will be working on it for you already
- don't go off on a tangent (maths pun!) they have a specific marking scheme, you only have to show/prove/find out EXACTLY what it specifies...otherwise you are just wasting time
- if you think it is wrong...it probably is.

have fun!

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