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Presentation: Effect of Videogames on Gamers

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I got an 18.5/20 for my mark. :) It was one of the highest in the class, and my video was a big hit with my classmates.

Thanks for all the help, guys and girls! :)



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Alright, so I've narrowed down my topic a bit (to make a better knowledge issue, and to also make sure that I'm keeping within the presentation time limit). Now, this is what I have, with a few examples :)

Does playing video games negatively effect the mentality of youth?

Good
•Promote learning
•Social skills (also learning about cultures) -- Xbox Live
•Technological skills
•Provides a platform for artistic expression -- Machinima, artwork, fanfiction
•Some are very thought-provoking (TOK discussion!) -- Silent Hill series
•Heightens consciousness (more lucid dreams for gamers!) -- It's thought that gamers can better control thier dreams
•Builds leadership skills, team work skills -- Xbox Live and multiplayer
•Alters brain functions (positively)

Bad
•Keeps them from doing homework
•Promotes violence -- Grand Theft Auto
•Can push “mentally unstable” people “off the edge” (blamed for shootings)
•Desensitize
•Causes confusion about what is real and what is not, confusion about what works in the real world and does not
•Causes sudden changes in emotion
•Exposes them to negative images (scantly clad women, violence, weaponry, language, rasicm) -- Grand Theft Auto
•Promotes a negative image of women
•Addictions
•Alters brain functions (negatively)
•Causes youth to become socially inactive

I am wondering if I should narrow it down to simply videogames that include violence... which is most of them.

Any help (even very blunt) is muchly appriciated! (as always) :)


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Before the edit...


Here I am again, and with a much more fun topic. I am a heavy gamer (PC, XBox, and PS2) so I have quite a bit of experience with the effect that games have on you while you play, and even after you've left the console. While I was playing Halo 3 a couple nights ago, I was in a party of about 5 of us (all players I do not know in person), and we got into a discussion about whether little kids should be playing videogames (as in the last game we played, a 5-some year old started cursing at us to the point where I broke out in shocked laughter). That's when the idea came to me: hell, it would be easy to research, fun to test, and everyone could have some input about it. :)
But I'm having a bit of trouble: I'm not really SURE exactly what I should be adressing. I'm a science, not a TOK/english student, so I'm having trouble choosing a good "Knowledge Issue". I have some down, but I want to use one that will incorperate as many viewpoints as possible (to bring in good discussion). I'm planning to "interview" some students and gameplaying adults, and include a couple videos dispicting my points (violence, etc.). I even have a couple videos that are based on how emotions are effected while gaming. I'm really excited to do this presentation.

What affect does video gaming (i.e. playing Xbox, Play station, Nintendo) have on the gamer?
Should we be playing video games, or not?
Should young children be allowed to play videogames?
Do parents need to treat gaming like a probable addiction?
Should there be an age minimum for "Live"? (i.e. XBox live)
Should certain games be banned for youth because of excessive violence?
Has gaming "crossed the line"?

For
• Meeting new people online; socializing, learning about cultures, making "friends"
• Immersing yourself into the story (like reading a novel, connecting to the characters)
• Learn the language used in the game
• Provides a thrill, fun
• Are becoming more realistic (very similar to a movie)
• Provides a platform for “artistic expression” (i.e. Machinima, fanfiction)
• Some are very thought-provoking
• Provides a learning experience (hones learning skills? Some games are built for this purpose)
• Some games are now providing physical exertion

Against
• May alter thought process (desensitize, confused about what works in the "real world" and what doesn't)
• Emotions (angry, annoyed, upset)
• Alters view of the world (confused about what is real and what is not)
• Meeting idiots online (also don’t really know the people)
• Too much violence
• Addictions
• Strains your eyes
• Gives you headaches
• Explicit materials (language, sex scenes)
• Does not provide physical exertion

Edited by LancerGirl

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Good topic, and you have some great points, but it would help if you throw in a bit of TOK terminology. If you address what arguments relate to Language, Perception, Reason, and Emotion, then it would be a lot more structured and put you at an advantage. Also, I would suggest that you drop a few of your points and elaborate more on the rest of them. The more points you have, the broader you are but at the cost of depth. And you don't want to look shallow or superficial. So try to elaborate (examples help), and don't just state the points. You'll look like you know what you're talking about that way. Edited by Mr. Shiver

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[quote name='Mr. Shiver' post='17193' date='May 25 2008, 06:34 PM']Good topic, and you have some great points, but it would help if you throw in a bit of TOK terminology. If you address what arguments relate to Language, Perception, Reason, and Emotion, then it would be a lot more structured and put you at an advantage. Also, I would suggest that you drop a few of your points and elaborate more on the rest of them. The more points you have, the broader you are but at the cost of depth. And you don't want to look shallow or superficial. So try to elaborate (examples help), and don't just state the points. You'll look like you know what you're talking about that way.[/quote]

:D Thankyou, it's a big help! I really appriciate your input.

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It sounds like you've got a good set of knowledge claims and justifications to talk about. It might help to keep you focus on the ways of knowing and the implications of the claims. Also you may want to talk about ethics as an area of knowing. Perhaps talk about utilitarianism: ie. the greatest happiness for the greatest number of people. How does video gaming for young kids fit into that? You could mention relativist ethics as well.

Good luck. The topic sounds great so you should be fine. I've just finished my presentation. I did it on knowledge issues surrounding the teaching of history. What should we teach, why, why not etc.

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Guest syrianstar
I've been meaning to reply to your thread for ages, but only just got round to it! To be honest I think you're topic sounds great and from the details you have in you're post it looks like you know which direction you're heading in. All I can say is GO FOR IT!

Also I was surfing the net and I found an article which discusses the 10 reasons why gaming might actually [b]benefit [/b]children - I thought you might find it useful, especially when trying to show both sides of the argument.

Here's the link: [url="http://tech.uk.msn.com/gaming/article.aspx?cp-documentid=8390289"]http://tech.uk.msn.com/gaming/article.aspx...umentid=8390289[/url]

Goog Luck :D Edited by syrianstar

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As a gamer, I say one of the best skills I have aquired through countless hours is teamwork. In most games you are plunged into senarios, with people that you may never have talked to and your forced to work with them twoards a common goal, winning.

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[quote name='syrianstar' post='17563' date='May 31 2008, 11:21 AM']I've been meaning to reply to your thread for ages, but only just got round to it! To be honest I think you're topic sounds great and from the details you have in you're post it looks like you know which direction you're heading in. All I can say is GO FOR IT!

Also I was surfing the net and I found an article which discusses the 10 reasons why gaming might actually [b]benefit [/b]children - I thought you might find it useful, especially when trying to show both sides of the argument.

Here's the link: [url="http://tech.uk.msn.com/gaming/article.aspx?cp-documentid=8390289"]http://tech.uk.msn.com/gaming/article.aspx...umentid=8390289[/url]

Goog Luck :) [/quote]


Wow! :) Thanks! This is a great help!

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[quote name='callum' post='17483' date='May 30 2008, 02:52 AM']It sounds like you've got a good set of knowledge claims and justifications to talk about. It might help to keep you focus on the ways of knowing and the implications of the claims. Also you may want to talk about ethics as an area of knowing. Perhaps talk about utilitarianism: ie. the greatest happiness for the greatest number of people. How does video gaming for young kids fit into that? You could mention relativist ethics as well.

Good luck. The topic sounds great so you should be fine. I've just finished my presentation. I did it on knowledge issues surrounding the teaching of history. What should we teach, why, why not etc.[/quote]

I've never heard of "utilitarianism" before. XD Thanks for the cool word and the tips. ^^

Oh, and by the way: how did your presentation go? A close friend of mine is doing something very similar for her presentation.

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Personally I think you should concentrate on one very specific knowledge issue. If you explore the whole idea, your audience may get confused about what your knowledge issues are.

I'd do something about the negative images in games like GTA (which you mentioned in your first post). You could explore why most people perceive these images to be negative, and perhaps how immersing oneself in the images can change one's emotions, rationality and perception.

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