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How to deal with multiple poems in an English ee?

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I am trying to figure out this whole ee thing, and so far it's not going so great. I am still trying to figure out an exact topic and RQ, but I know my subject will be English and I would like to deal with poetry.

My question(s):

1) How many poems should I compare (they'll be written by the same author btw)?

2) How should I approach the comparison of multiple poems? Should I deal with each poem separately, or based on literary techniques, themes?

3) How do I research an English ee??!! Should I analyze the poems myself as well as study what other people have said about them? Should it be more of my analysis or their's?? Researching for English is really confusing me as I don't know where/how to start!!

4) How long did it take you guys to write your English ee? How much time should I devote to it? I really procrastinated this summer and am now freaking out ( first draft isn't due until October, but it seems so soon!!!)

As you can see, I am a hot mess :-(

So any advice/comments would be oh so very appreciated!!

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My EE is due in 5 days so don't worry, I'm a hot mess too!

Okay so in response to your questions (I'm doing my EE on two books but my close friend is doing hers on a poet and I've read her scaffold):

1. The number of poems you compare is up to you - it depends on the evidence you need and the length of the poems... just finalise your RQ and then see which poems match it. You should have roughly 5-7 poems (once again, it depends on length).

2. The way you organise your EE is like so:

Introduction

Paragraph 1: the first theme, with evidence from various poems

Repeat x 5 (or whatever you need)

Conclusion

3. It should be more of your analysis, the EE must be completely your own work and thoughts - however if you use JSTOR or resources like it, you should put those resources into your bibliography or cite them properly.

4. I'm very behind on my EE and it's due in 5 days so I beg you... DO NOT PROCRASTINATE.

You're meant to spend 40 hours on it, but that depends on how fast you work and what subject and what you need to do.

This was my friend's process:

1. Find poet

2. Find RQ

3. Find poems

4. Go through and analyse all the poems

5. Write out a detailed scaffold

6. Begin writing!!

So good luck, bonne chance! :)

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My EE is due in 5 days so don't worry, I'm a hot mess too!

I am so glad I've found someone who can relate haha!

This was my friend's process:

1. Find poet

2. Find RQ

3. Find poems

4. Go through and analyse all the poems

5. Write out a detailed scaffold

6. Begin writing!!

So good luck, bonne chance! :)

Thank you so so so much for your advice, it's very helpful!

Would you mind elaborating on how your friend structured her "detailed scaffold" - That would be an outline, if I'm not mistaken?

Once again, thank you for your advice - and I totally hear you when you say don't procrastinate - that's usually my biggest fault :-S

So I'm trying my best not to botch up this ee by procrastinating... TRYING anyway.... x-D

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Okay so by scaffold I do mean an outline and this is how she did it:

Introduction

- write out a rough draft of what you want to say in your intro

- remember to emphasise your Research Question and Thesis

Body

Make titles for each of your paragraphs (you should have anywhere between 6 and 10) and under each of these titles, write a short summary of what that paragraph is about. Then find quotes and put them in and maybe add a little analysis.

Conclusion

- summing up, mention your thesis again

Basically, by writing a detailed outline you can keep on top of structure, quotes etc and it leads to a well organised essay.

Other tips:

Keep the marking criteria beside you when writing

Write in small-ish increments - don't drag it out but obviously don't leave it too late

Hand in 2 drafts at least to your supervisor!

Make sure you LOVE the subject, because if you don't it gets really boring, really fast

Good luck!

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2) How should I approach the comparison of multiple poems? Should I deal with each poem separately, or based on literary techniques, themes?

3) How do I research an English ee??!! Should I analyze the poems myself as well as study what other people have said about them? Should it be more of my analysis or their's?? Researching for English is really confusing me as I don't know where/how to start!!

!

To add to the already excellent answers...

Question #2: The choice of approach is yours. How you go about it depends on how adept you are at writing and structuring a comparative research essay. Some take each poem separately and analyze it thoroughly before combining the separate works into a whole at the end. Avoid this approach, unless you are very good at maintaining focus and supremely confident in being able combine the separate pieces into a whole, at the very end. The safest course is to have a running commentary (a thread), that allows you to keep sight of your RQ as you make your points, with each poem providing evidence for the point you are making. You will have several points to make which help answer your RQ. Your argument, then, (and not the individual works), becomes your thread -- your points attaching themselves to it, much like carriages to a train. Your argument is the engine and tracks.

Make sure that your points clearly contribute to answering the RQ. :)

Presumably, you will have already identified a governing idea for all the works (implied by your RQ) and decided how each poem exemplifies or reinforces, in its various ways, this main idea? The detailed analysis of each poem is quite simply a way to discuss in detail how the poet's choice of words and structure convey certain meanings.

Q.#3 - The role of outside sources is to help you discover points of interest and similarities between works. They are not meant to replace your own thoughts, but can help sharpen your appreciation for what the poet has achieved.

Edited by Blackcurrant
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