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Guest Vien Ton

Realistically im going to get around 35-38 in the I.B.

I study the I.B. in Greece, i'm in year 13 gonna finish my exams in May.

My HLs are Business, Biology, & Psychology

SLs are Math, English AB, Spanish AB initio.

& i have an Australian citizenship.

I want to apply for the Bachelor of Commerce course. Or something related to biology like bioengineering.

I was wondering, based on the competition involved and my target I.B. score, how hard is it get an almost guaranteed entry or just get accepted in?

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Realistically im going to get around 35-38 in the I.B.

I study the I.B. in Greece, i'm in year 13 gonna finish my exams in May.

My HLs are Business, Biology, & Psychology

SLs are Math, English AB, Spanish AB initio.

& i have an Australian citizenship.

I want to apply for the Bachelor of Commerce course. Or something related to biology like bioengineering.

I was wondering, based on the competition involved and my target I.B. score, how hard is it get an almost guaranteed entry or just get accepted in?

Bioengineering you said. Don't you need chem for that?

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In Australia your IB score gets converted to an ATAR (at least for domestic students), then you use the equivalent to get accepted to different courses. A score of 35, gets converted to around 93, and a 38 will give yiou around a 96. Both of which are high. However, at UNSW, you need 96.3 to get into commerce, which is exactly the same a score of 28, so with yearly variation, you might miss out. it is slightly lower at Usyd (95 or 37), and most other NSW unis you should get in with an ATAR of 90, or less.

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Just to clarify from theboro76, an ATAR is basically a score that universities use to compare you to other students. If you want to see how your IB will be converted into an Australian ATAR, here is a link to the conversion table from the official VTAC website (VTAC is the organisation that manages university admissions for Victoria, and they look after the ATAR) :

http://www.vtac.edu.au/pdf/ib_notional_atar.pdf

At Melbourne Uni, you need to get the following IB score to get into:

Commerce: at least a 35

Science: a 35 should get you in

Biomedicine: ATAR/IB score is much higher- you need at least a 38

http://futurestudents.unimelb.edu.au/admissions/entry-requirements/undergraduate-domestic

These scores are for domestic (Australian) students, but I'm guessing they'll be pretty similar for international students too given that the IB score is universal across the world :)

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From the ATAR conversion it says that at 93.00 ATAR (35 IB) you will be considered, and at 95.00 ATAR (37 IB) you will be guaranteed a commonwealth supported place. I'm not sure how to go about this. That's all I know. I'll probably go to Monash or RMIT if I don't get the required UofM score.

When I select IB in the drop down menu it says that 93.00 ATAR is the notional ATAR.

Edited by Alwaysanexttime

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That's if you are doing the local program, the entry scores are different for IB. It might be more like a 32-31. If you go onto the university of Melbourne website and go to the degree you want, you can select from a drop down box that you do IB and it will tell you the IB equivalent you need.

I don't really know why it's different, but it works in our favour so I'm not complaining

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