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Are these subject fine for applying Oxford law?

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Guest Unchenti

Hi I am a student who is taking subjects :

History HL

Economics HL


German A HL

English B HL

Math SL

Biology SL

Are there any subjects that Oxford law doesn't prefer in my schedule?

Is it important to take Math HL to go there?

And if you had prepared for Oxford law, could you guys tell me what did you read or done ...etc?

All ways thank you for helping me.

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Your subjects are very much fine, you by no means need Maths HL. It won't help you in any way, just make your life more difficult. You also do not need 4 HLs, it's a waste of time. If you want to ask me any specific questions about my application or studying here, feel free to. Just PM me or quote me when you ask here so I know you asked. :)

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Guest Unchenti

Your subjects are very much fine, you by no means need Maths HL. It won't help you in any way, just make your life more difficult. You also do not need 4 HLs, it's a waste of time. If you want to ask me any specific questions about my application or studying here, feel free to. Just PM me or quote me when you ask here so I know you asked. :)

Thanks for your kind reply.

I hope you are having a nice time.

But for me, I don't really know what to do to go Oxford, really. Especially, preparing interviews or tests for it.

Could you tell me about your application?

It would be grateful to hear information or story about your life in secondary school and Oxford.

Thank you

Edited by JESUS

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I didn't really prepare for the interviews, or the LNAT. And none of the people in my college really did any preparations for the LNAT.

I was quite active in secondary school, because I knew I had to have something to write about in my personal statement later on. However, it ended up being that I had more stuff to write about that I had space for, so I guess I took the right approach. I was an elected member of the Youth City Council in my city, in which I represented my school alongside people from other schools in my city. I was also, and still am, an active member of the European Youth Parliament, with a title of international delegate, which allows me to represent Poland at international sessions. You can usually get involved in EYP through your school or the national committee in your country. EYP was probably the single most important EC for me, not only for my application, but generally for my skills of working in a group, sometimes an international one, voicing my opinions etc. I also took part in MUN session, which can also usually be found through school or individually. There are hundreds, if not thousands, of those events organised worldwide each year. I took part in an American moot court competition in my city and won the title of the best attorney in the competition. This most definitely was a valuable experience, but I'm not sure how easy or difficult it may be to find those in your are. You could organise a moot at school, though, it should also count as CAS. I went to court a few times to observe proceedings and shadowed a lawyer for a few days, observing the way they worked. I did some volunteering - I mentored a 4th grader, but I didn't mention that in my application. Also, I was a finalist (one of 56) in the English language Olympiad in Poland, which is considered to be one of the most difficult English competitions in Europe.

When applying to law, I believe that it is crucial that you engage in ECs that are somewhat related to what and how you're going to study. Things like debating, moot courts or any forms of simulations of proceedings of law-making institutions are valuable. Some work experience would always be welcome but I'm aware of how difficult it is to arrange those. You should also go to your local court and watch lawyers work, maybe ask some questions if they seem friendly enough. I also read the Law section of the Guardian occasionally and read a few cases that seemed interesting, but I didn't go crazy with it (you can find cases on BALII), you can also take a look at the acts of the parliament, they're available on the website.

I hope that helped, if you have any more questions, feel free to ask. :)

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Guest Unchenti

I didn't really prepare for the interviews, or the LNAT. And none of the people in my college really did any preparations for the LNAT.

I was quite active in secondary school, because I knew I had to have something to write about in my personal statement later on. However, it ended up being that I had more stuff to write about that I had space for, so I guess I took the right approach. I was an elected member of the Youth City Council in my city, in which I represented my school alongside people from other schools in my city. I was also, and still am, an active member of the European Youth Parliament, with a title of international delegate, which allows me to represent Poland at international sessions. You can usually get involved in EYP through your school or the national committee in your country. EYP was probably the single most important EC for me, not only for my application, but generally for my skills of working in a group, sometimes an international one, voicing my opinions etc. I also took part in MUN session, which can also usually be found through school or individually. There are hundreds, if not thousands, of those events organised worldwide each year. I took part in an American moot court competition in my city and won the title of the best attorney in the competition. This most definitely was a valuable experience, but I'm not sure how easy or difficult it may be to find those in your are. You could organise a moot at school, though, it should also count as CAS. I went to court a few times to observe proceedings and shadowed a lawyer for a few days, observing the way they worked. I did some volunteering - I mentored a 4th grader, but I didn't mention that in my application. Also, I was a finalist (one of 56) in the English language Olympiad in Poland, which is considered to be one of the most difficult English competitions in Europe.

When applying to law, I believe that it is crucial that you engage in ECs that are somewhat related to what and how you're going to study. Things like debating, moot courts or any forms of simulations of proceedings of law-making institutions are valuable. Some work experience would always be welcome but I'm aware of how difficult it is to arrange those. You should also go to your local court and watch lawyers work, maybe ask some questions if they seem friendly enough. I also read the Law section of the Guardian occasionally and read a few cases that seemed interesting, but I didn't go crazy with it (you can find cases on BALII), you can also take a look at the acts of the parliament, they're available on the website.

I hope that helped, if you have any more questions, feel free to ask. :)

Thank you very much for your kind reply ,

I didn't know EC was an important thing for applying Oxford.

I thought the most important thing to go there was to get a high grade in IB scores..

Well... unfortunately, I don't have an outstanding ability like you to participate in debates or things that you did :(

But anyway, I will try my best to participate on those things

oh, and did you do all of that in grade11 and 12?

Thanks!

Edited by JESUS

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I didn't really prepare for the interviews, or the LNAT. And none of the people in my college really did any preparations for the LNAT.

I was quite active in secondary school, because I knew I had to have something to write about in my personal statement later on. However, it ended up being that I had more stuff to write about that I had space for, so I guess I took the right approach. I was an elected member of the Youth City Council in my city, in which I represented my school alongside people from other schools in my city. I was also, and still am, an active member of the European Youth Parliament, with a title of international delegate, which allows me to represent Poland at international sessions. You can usually get involved in EYP through your school or the national committee in your country. EYP was probably the single most important EC for me, not only for my application, but generally for my skills of working in a group, sometimes an international one, voicing my opinions etc. I also took part in MUN session, which can also usually be found through school or individually. There are hundreds, if not thousands, of those events organised worldwide each year. I took part in an American moot court competition in my city and won the title of the best attorney in the competition. This most definitely was a valuable experience, but I'm not sure how easy or difficult it may be to find those in your are. You could organise a moot at school, though, it should also count as CAS. I went to court a few times to observe proceedings and shadowed a lawyer for a few days, observing the way they worked. I did some volunteering - I mentored a 4th grader, but I didn't mention that in my application. Also, I was a finalist (one of 56) in the English language Olympiad in Poland, which is considered to be one of the most difficult English competitions in Europe.

When applying to law, I believe that it is crucial that you engage in ECs that are somewhat related to what and how you're going to study. Things like debating, moot courts or any forms of simulations of proceedings of law-making institutions are valuable. Some work experience would always be welcome but I'm aware of how difficult it is to arrange those. You should also go to your local court and watch lawyers work, maybe ask some questions if they seem friendly enough. I also read the Law section of the Guardian occasionally and read a few cases that seemed interesting, but I didn't go crazy with it (you can find cases on BALII), you can also take a look at the acts of the parliament, they're available on the website.

I hope that helped, if you have any more questions, feel free to ask. :)

Thank you very much for your kind reply ,

I didn't know EC was an important thing for applying Oxford.

I thought the most important thing to go there was to get a high grade in IB scores..

Well... unfortunately, I don't have an outstanding ability like you to participate in debates or things that you did :(

But anyway, I will try my best to participate on those things

oh, and did you do all of that in grade11 and 12?

Thanks!

I did all this in the two years of the IB.

ECs per se are not important, but you need to show your interest in the subject. How else were you planning to do it? And when applying to Oxford, everyone has top grades, yet they don't let everyone in.

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Guest Unchenti

I didn't really prepare for the interviews, or the LNAT. And none of the people in my college really did any preparations for the LNAT.

I was quite active in secondary school, because I knew I had to have something to write about in my personal statement later on. However, it ended up being that I had more stuff to write about that I had space for, so I guess I took the right approach. I was an elected member of the Youth City Council in my city, in which I represented my school alongside people from other schools in my city. I was also, and still am, an active member of the European Youth Parliament, with a title of international delegate, which allows me to represent Poland at international sessions. You can usually get involved in EYP through your school or the national committee in your country. EYP was probably the single most important EC for me, not only for my application, but generally for my skills of working in a group, sometimes an international one, voicing my opinions etc. I also took part in MUN session, which can also usually be found through school or individually. There are hundreds, if not thousands, of those events organised worldwide each year. I took part in an American moot court competition in my city and won the title of the best attorney in the competition. This most definitely was a valuable experience, but I'm not sure how easy or difficult it may be to find those in your are. You could organise a moot at school, though, it should also count as CAS. I went to court a few times to observe proceedings and shadowed a lawyer for a few days, observing the way they worked. I did some volunteering - I mentored a 4th grader, but I didn't mention that in my application. Also, I was a finalist (one of 56) in the English language Olympiad in Poland, which is considered to be one of the most difficult English competitions in Europe.

When applying to law, I believe that it is crucial that you engage in ECs that are somewhat related to what and how you're going to study. Things like debating, moot courts or any forms of simulations of proceedings of law-making institutions are valuable. Some work experience would always be welcome but I'm aware of how difficult it is to arrange those. You should also go to your local court and watch lawyers work, maybe ask some questions if they seem friendly enough. I also read the Law section of the Guardian occasionally and read a few cases that seemed interesting, but I didn't go crazy with it (you can find cases on BALII), you can also take a look at the acts of the parliament, they're available on the website.

I hope that helped, if you have any more questions, feel free to ask. :)

Thank you very much for your kind reply ,

I didn't know EC was an important thing for applying Oxford.

I thought the most important thing to go there was to get a high grade in IB scores..

Well... unfortunately, I don't have an outstanding ability like you to participate in debates or things that you did :(

But anyway, I will try my best to participate on those things

oh, and did you do all of that in grade11 and 12?

Thanks!

I did all this in the two years of the IB.

ECs per se are not important, but you need to show your interest in the subject. How else were you planning to do it? And when applying to Oxford, everyone has top grades, yet they don't let everyone in.

Hi long time no see.

Well, as you recommended, I am going to participate in some debates and going to have an internship in the court in my country since my uncle is a Judge.

Are there something more to recommend me to do?

oh, and I was wondering if the school report or progress report(?) are also important for applying for Oxford law. Because I was

absent about 3 weeks in first part of the semester, my grade was not so good, even though I did my best.

Are there any other tips for IB?

Thank you

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I didn't really prepare for the interviews, or the LNAT. And none of the people in my college really did any preparations for the LNAT.

I was quite active in secondary school, because I knew I had to have something to write about in my personal statement later on. However, it ended up being that I had more stuff to write about that I had space for, so I guess I took the right approach. I was an elected member of the Youth City Council in my city, in which I represented my school alongside people from other schools in my city. I was also, and still am, an active member of the European Youth Parliament, with a title of international delegate, which allows me to represent Poland at international sessions. You can usually get involved in EYP through your school or the national committee in your country. EYP was probably the single most important EC for me, not only for my application, but generally for my skills of working in a group, sometimes an international one, voicing my opinions etc. I also took part in MUN session, which can also usually be found through school or individually. There are hundreds, if not thousands, of those events organised worldwide each year. I took part in an American moot court competition in my city and won the title of the best attorney in the competition. This most definitely was a valuable experience, but I'm not sure how easy or difficult it may be to find those in your are. You could organise a moot at school, though, it should also count as CAS. I went to court a few times to observe proceedings and shadowed a lawyer for a few days, observing the way they worked. I did some volunteering - I mentored a 4th grader, but I didn't mention that in my application. Also, I was a finalist (one of 56) in the English language Olympiad in Poland, which is considered to be one of the most difficult English competitions in Europe.

When applying to law, I believe that it is crucial that you engage in ECs that are somewhat related to what and how you're going to study. Things like debating, moot courts or any forms of simulations of proceedings of law-making institutions are valuable. Some work experience would always be welcome but I'm aware of how difficult it is to arrange those. You should also go to your local court and watch lawyers work, maybe ask some questions if they seem friendly enough. I also read the Law section of the Guardian occasionally and read a few cases that seemed interesting, but I didn't go crazy with it (you can find cases on BALII), you can also take a look at the acts of the parliament, they're available on the website.

I hope that helped, if you have any more questions, feel free to ask. :)

Thank you very much for your kind reply ,

I didn't know EC was an important thing for applying Oxford.

I thought the most important thing to go there was to get a high grade in IB scores..

Well... unfortunately, I don't have an outstanding ability like you to participate in debates or things that you did :(

But anyway, I will try my best to participate on those things

oh, and did you do all of that in grade11 and 12?

Thanks!

I did all this in the two years of the IB.

ECs per se are not important, but you need to show your interest in the subject. How else were you planning to do it? And when applying to Oxford, everyone has top grades, yet they don't let everyone in.

Hi long time no see.

Well, as you recommended, I am going to participate in some debates and going to have an internship in the court in my country since my uncle is a Judge.

Are there something more to recommend me to do?

oh, and I was wondering if the school report or progress report(?) are also important for applying for Oxford law. Because I was

absent about 3 weeks in first part of the semester, my grade was not so good, even though I did my best.

Are there any other tips for IB?

Thank you

Oxford doesn't get to see any reports. You apply with your predicted grades. Unless your teacher mentions something about it in your reference (which is highly unlikely as they will have forgotten about it by then), you're just fine.

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